Skip to main content

Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

See other formats



«SSB 

^'3 « 





■■■■■■.. 











\',^'aI 




|£*AV 



ii 



1 ! 





ss 



Hi 

mm 



UmWM 



«P 



■ 



IIH 



■■■■ 

■ 

(■ , .(iiV. , Jv'r!:' , KT" 

■ 

111 

1111 

HO II 

■ 

Hi 



I 

Ira 

lilt 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
AND THE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 17, 1966, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : President Lederle, Committee 
Chairmen Haigis and Troy; 
Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds : Trustees Brown, 
Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis, 
Thompson; Committee on Faculty 
and Educational Policy : Trustees 
Haigis, Lyons, Plimpton, Rowland, 
Solomon; Trustees Croce, McNamara, 
Frechette; Provost Tippo, 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Messrs. Galehouse and Otis of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates. 



Trustee Haigis was designated to act as Chairman of the 
joint committee meeting. He made brief reference to "Progress Re- 
port #2 — Evaluation of the Highland Park Area for the University 
of Massachusetts/Boston", (Document 66-078) herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson in- 
troduced Mr. Richard F. Galehouse of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates to present a slide show of the Highland Park area, these 
slides having previously been shown to the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds. 

The slides displayed many views of the Highland Park area 
illustrating the existing condition of properties, elevations and 
historical sites. Mr. Galehouse noted that the area is mainly com- 
posed of rock and is very "buildable". Additional slides 
illustrated the mixed residential and business development, site 
density and row houses. 

Mr. Galehouse said that he was satisfied that this area 
of approximately 165 acres could accommodate the proposed building 
models for UM/Boston, recommended at 14 to 17-stories high. 
Residence halls were excluded. 

He reported on a meeting on May 12 in the office of BRA 
Director Logue's office, where the same slide presentation had 
been made. Forty percent of the area within the City of Boston is 
not taxed at present. The City desires to have an annual payment 
in lieu of taxes. The City's requirements are detailed in Section 
II of Document 66-078. 



2721 



Progress 
Report: 
UM/Boston 
Site Survey 






COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson quoted Mr. Logue as saying that it was 
desirable to double the tax revenue from each area redeveloped 
within the City. On the other hand, he was "not firm on this". 
It was agreed that some figure would have to be firmed up before 
plans could move forward. 

Mr. Galehouse reported that existing utilities in the 
area probably would not support high rise redevelopment on the site, 
with the possible exception of sewer lines. The University would 
have to construct and install its own utilities. It was noted also 
that excavation could prove to be more costly in Highland Park. 
Estimated land costs (cleared) would be $10,000 per acre to the 
University. Intown acreage., cannot normally be obtained at so low a 
figure . 

Approximately one year would be required for the planning 
of the site; an additional 1.5 years for going through BRA. (site 
clearing, etc.) and 6 months for review and approval by the City of 
Boston. Mr. Logue had indicated in his conference that families 
can be relocated at a rate of approximately 20 per month without 
excessive difficulty. 

In summary: 

a. The Highland Park area site will meet 
the requirements of the University. 

b. It will be possible to work through 
the urban renewal process. 

c. The City of Boston has the best pro- 
gram in urban renewal in the United 
States at the present time. 

A question was raised concerning what review process by 
the City would be implemented in 6 to 10 years from this date. 
Mr. Galehouse responded that all revisions in plans must be re- 
viewed, particularly with respect to architectural changes. He 
added that Mr. Logue had talked about starting the UM/Boston campus 
program with a token ten acres under Federal Funds presently avail- 
able. 

President Lederle queried Mr. Galehouse concerning the 
number of existing buildings on the site which might be preserved. 
Mr. Logue, he stated, felt that very few were worth preserving. 
Mr. Galehouse responded that there were pockets worth preserving 
here and there. He stated that Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
have a prejudice against the "bulldoze approach" stemming from 
difficulties which have occurred with renewal projects along 'these 
lines in the past. 

Chairman Haigis noted that Mr. Logue was very clear on 
leaving only two buildings. He indicated that there were approxi- 
mately H00 structures in the area; 1100 families; 7,000 persons 
(now down to about 5,000 as migration occurs regularly). 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was noted that Federal Funds are available to move 
certain dwellings to make a pocket around the church site. This 
might involve certain specific homes of design characteristics 
that may never appear again such as Victorian, colonnaded colonial, 
etc . 

The President pointed out that buildings simply cannot 
be left around at random as they get in the way of planned con- 
struction;- so do certain street patterns. 

Chancellor Ryan stated that Director Logue and Mayor 
Collins now favor the University coming into the Highland Park 
area providing that the City's interest is protected. He stated 
that the following steps should be taken in order: 

a. The Trustees should decide whether or 
not they feel that this is the first 
priority site and, if so, give a green 
light to further progress. 

b. The City Redevelopment Authority must 
be given authority to change their 
present classification of the Highland 
Park area to a clearance policy. 

c . Agreement should be worked out with the 
Mayor and assurances given concerning 

a lieu of taxes payment. 

d. Communications should be established 
with the Legislative and Executive 
branches of the Commonwealth, with the 
Boston School Committee and with 
neighborhood groups . 

It was pointed out that it may be 10 or 15 years before 
the University will require all of the proposed site. Chancellor 
Ryan indicated that he would like to work with neighborhood groups 
between now and mid-June to determine what their problems are. He 
also pointed out that the University's position would be improved 
if we had title to the entire Highland Park site. 

Treasurer Jobnson recapitulated Mr. Logue 's proposed 
schedule as follows: 

a. Explore leadership at the State House 
concerning acceptability of the plan. 

b. Establish and implement a community 
PR program. 

c . Obtain a memorandum of agreement be- 
tween the Commonwealth and the Uni- 
versity. 



2723 



2724 



COMMITTEE 



Application 
for TV 
License 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



If steps (a) through (c) have been completed, Mr. Logue 
would go before the City Council on the basis of the following: 

a. Requesting a step approach which would 
take over the worst property immediately. 

b. Arrange to pick up properties that come 
on the market over the months ahead. 

c. Encourage the University to develop a 
total site development plan while (a) 
and (b) above are in process. When 
the plan is finally developed , the 
entire site would be allocated to the 
University. 

After further discussion, it was agreed that an ad hoc 
committee consisting of the Chairmen of the Executive Committee, 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds and the Committee on 
Faculty and Education Policy together with administrators 
designated by President Lederle comprise a group to confer in- 
formally with the Governor, the Speaker of the House, the President 
of the Senate, the Majority Leader of the House, the Majority 
Leader of the Senate, and the Chairmen of the Ways and Means 
Committees of the Senate and House concerning proposed plans for 
UM/Boston. 

An informal show of hands by the Trustees present indi- 
cated that they approved the plan to consider the Highland Park 
area for a permanent UM/Boston site. The informal meeting with the 
Executive and Legislative leadership is to be held prior to the 
June meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the President, the Treasurer and the 
Secretary of the University be, and each 
acting a] one hereby is, authorized in the 
name and on behalf of the University to 
apply to the Federal Communications 
Commission for a construction -permit, 
license and any and all other necessary or 
desirable authorization to enable the Uni- 
versity to construct, maintain and operate 
an educational television station; that all 
action heretofore taken on behalf of the 
University with respect to application to 
the Federal Communications Commission for 
the issuance or transfer, or both, of a 
license to maintain and operate FM radio 



I 



iOMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



station WFCR-FM be and the same hereby is 
adopted and ratified as the action of the 
University; and that said officers be, and 
each acting alone hereby is, authorized in 
the name and behalf of the University to 
execute, deliver, accept, file and prose- 
cute such agreements, applications, amend- 
ments, contracts and other instruments and 
papers and to do such other things as the 
officer so acting shall, as conclusively 
evidenced by his taking the action hereby 
authorized, deem necessary or desirable in 
connection with the filing of applications 
for, and the prosecution thereof to issuance 
of, the licenses, permits and authorizations 
aforesaid. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the President and Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity be, and each acting alone hereby is, 
authorized in the name and behalf of the 
University to sign, file and prosecute such 
application or applications with the De- 
partment of Health, Education and Welfare 
and with any other Department of the Federal 
Government, including any agency authorized 
by any such Department to administer grant 
programs at the state level, for a grant or 
grants under any applicable law for the pur- 
pose of meeting all or any part of the cost 
of acquiring, constructing, equipping and 
furnishing facilities for the production and 
transmission, one or both, of educational 
television programs by the University, each 
such application to be in such form and to 
be accompanied by such exhibits and additional 
information as may be required by the govern- 
mental agency concerned; and that the execu- 
tion and delivery by such officer of any such 
application shall be conclusive evidence that 
the same was authorized by this vote. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that bids had been received a 
few days ago on a road construction contract for a thoroughfare be- 
tween Amity Street and Rocky Hill Road at the south, joining 
Fearing Street at the northeast. 



27 



OK 



Award of 
Road Con- 
uction 
Contract 



2726 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the contract for the construction of On 
Campus Boulevards, Phase I, University of 
Massachusetts - Project Number 64- 1, Con- 
tract No. 3, Account Numbers 8065-28-00 and 
8066-70-00, roads and sidewalks, be awarded 
to the lowest eligible and responsible 
bidder, Daniel 0'Connell's Sons, Inc., of 
Holyoke, Massachusetts, in amount of the 
total bid of $857,989.00 and to authorize 
the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, to 
execute said construction contract in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees and 
to take any and all other actions necessary 
to complete the work in accordance with 
the plans and specifications. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 




ft LaAWdti 



Roty 
Secrete 



t J. McCartney 
Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 24, 1966, 11 :00 a.m., President's Office, U of M 

PRESENT : Chairman Troyj President Lederle; Trustees 
Haigis, Plimpton, Rowland; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson; Secretary's Staff 
Assistant Miller. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Deans Bischoff, Hunsberger, McGuirk, 
Moore, Pippert, Wagner; Professors 
Havard, Me lien, Zube; Assistant to 
the Provost Venman. 

Chairman Troy called the meeting to order. 

The effect of a recent budget cut was discussed at length. 
President Lederle said he believed a supplemental budget would be 
available which would cover faculty costs. UMass/Boston enrollment 
and the side effects of budget cutbacks were discussed. Provost 
Tippo said that the faculty has largely been appointed, and the 
budget will have to be increased to carry out programs of study. 

Provost Tippo explained the internal curriculum review 
procedure, referring to the introductory paragraph in Document 
66-074-. He suggested the committee focus attention on new programs 
of study and stated that the new courses reflect the University's 
expansion. 



^72~ 



~7 



Budget 
Cutback 



Dean Moore summarized the School of Education proposal for 
a new program to develop specialists in Curriculum and Instruction 
mder the existing Ed.D. degree, stressing that the program is 
offered jointly with the appropriate department in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Dean Pippert supported the proposal and pointed 
out that curriculum coordination and development is a growing area 
with movement toward specialization in this field. 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposal for a new program 
to develop specialists in Curriculum and In- 
struction under the existing Ed.D. degree as 
outlined in Document 66-082, which document 
is attached and made a part of these minutes. 



Professor Zube, Head of the Department of Landscape 
Architecture, was introduced. Discussion centered on the proposed 
modifications in the Landscape Architecture graduate curriculum. 
The fifth-year program currently in effect, which leads to a 
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, would be discontinued. The new 



Ed.D. in 

Curriculum 

and Instruction 



M.L.A. 
Modifications 



COMMITTEE 



Physical 
Education 
Equipment 
Fee 



Cartter 
Study 



Law School 
Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proposal would strengthen the Master or Landscape Architecture 
program and bring the curriculum up to date. It was determined 
that no additional staff would be required, and the present staff 
would he utilized more effectively. 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposed modifications in 
the Landscape Architecture- Graduate Curriculum 
as outlined in Document 66-083, which document 
is attached and made a part of these minutes. 

Dean McGuirk presented a recommendation for assessing a 
$10.00 Pnysical Education Equipment Fee for sophomore men and 
women. The University has a two-year required physical education 
program. By establishing such a fee, Dean McGuirk explained, a 
stock of necessary uniforms, bathing suits, equipment and other 
athletic items could be developed. It would also enable the de- 
partment to build up a clothing inventory for laundry exchange. 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Boarct of Trustees that 

they approve the proposed Physical Education 
Equipment Fee for male and femai sophomore 
students as outlined in Document 66-084, 
which document is attacnect and maae a part 
of tnese minutes. 

Dean Moore discussed the Cartter Study entitled, "An 
Assessment of Quality in Graduate Hiducation", a comparative study 
of graduate departments in 29 academic disciplines. Because tne 
aata xor -one study were gathered in 1964, it was emphasized that 
this type of rating system does not give tne necessary comparative 
data to provide a true picture of a rapidly growing university. 
Provost Tippo said tnat tne uartter study does show that the uni- 
versity still has far to go in acnieving its goals in graduate 
study . 

The committee next adjourned for luncheon in the Dukes 
Room wnere it was joined by Professor Havard who presented a 
summary of the report of the Ad Hoc Law Scnool committee. Professor 
Havard reported that in order for a state university to become a 
complete university, tne establishment of a law school was a 
necessary prerequisite. Among otner conclusions reached by the ad 
hoc committee was that the law scnool should be established in 
Amherst with an optimum enrollment of 500; the normal student- 
teacner ratio is large; and that self-contained premises are 
necessary for accreditation, but existing academic space could be 
used until a separate law scnool building could be acquired. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Havard suggested early contact witn tne American Bar 
Association and the Association of American Law Scnools once a 
decision to proceed with a law school had been reacned. 

President Lederle said the ad hoc committee's pro- 
jected costs appeared nign, ana the cost estimates should be kept 
modest at this time. He recommended xnat inasmucn as the law 
school proposal represents a major program, it should nave the 
support of the Board of Higher Education. 

Following rurtuer discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the Law School Ad Hoc Committee 
report, "Feasibility Study: The Need for a 
University of Massachusetts Law School", 
Document 66-081, as attached to and made 
a part of these minutes, and forward copies 
to the Board of Trustees for study. 

Dean Hunsberger and Associate Dean Wagner of the College 
of Arts and Sciences presented new and revised courses of study as 
outlined in Document 66-074. Following lengthy discussion of 
several new courses, it was suggested by President Lederle that the 
full Board of Trustees not be burdened with the task of perusing 
the volumes of material on new courses each time they are proposed. 
It was pointed out that a tnorough study of the courses was made by 
an internal curriculum review procedure before they are presented 
for consideration by the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Education- 
al Policy. 

Dean Hunsberger announced the appointment of a Curriculum 
Study Committee within the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Following further discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of new courses as outlined in 
Document 66-07-4, which document is attached 
to and made a part of these minutes. 

New course proposals of the School of Physical Education 
were presented by Associate Dean Bischoff , as outlined in Document 
66-074. Dr. Campney was invited to explain the new course proposal, 
7^0, Advanced Physiology of Exercises. Dean Bischoff presented the 
revision of the Recreation Major Curriculum which was a result of 
tne reconsideration requested by the Trustee Committee on Faculty 
and Educational Policy. 

Following further discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 



2729 



Arts & 

Sciences 

Courses 



Recreation 
Revision 



2730 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of new course proposals as 
outlined in Document 66-07-4 and to 
recommend approval of the Revision of 
the Recreation Major as outlined in 
Document 66-085, whicn documents are 
attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

Following brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of new course proposals of the 
School of Business Administration as out- 
lined in Document 66-0^4, wnich document 
is attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

Dr. Venman said that six program proposals will he sub- 
mitted to the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
at its next meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:06 p.m. 




Alan R. Mille 
Secretary pro tem 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

June 21, 1966, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; Trustees 
Brown, Emerson and Maginnis; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Chancellor Ryan 



Chairman Haigis called upon Treasurer Johnson who stated 
that certain punch- list items in the Food Science and Technology 
Addition had not yet been corrected including difficulties with the 
environmental chambers, stuck windows, faulty dampers on the 
exhaust fans, etc. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept the Food Science and Technology 
Addition subject to corrections as detailed 
In a list in the possession of Treasurer 
Johnson. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that three appraisal reports 
have been received on land owned by the Syrian Church at the site 
of the Medical School in Worcester. This site includes approxi- 
mately six acres of land at the corner of Belmont Street and 
Plantation Street. 

The Treasurer noted that the City of Worcester had 
assessed this property for the years 1964 and 1965 at $49,000. 
After brief discussion, it was the sense of the committee that pre- 
liminary negotiations on this property should proceed with the 
representatives of the Syrian Church, and that the Trustees should 
be represented by legal counsel in the negotiations with respect 
to this property. 

H. E. Shaw Building . The committee discussed at some 
length the question of the H. E. Shaw Building which 
is located adjacent to the corner of Belmont Avenue at 
the site of the Medical School in Worcester. However, 
in view of negotiations which must proceed at this 
time with the Syrian Church, it was agreed that the 
committee would move on only one piece of property at 
a time, and further consideration of the H. E. Shaw 
Building was postponed for the time being. 

Dziuba Property. Amherst . This property is located on 
Amity Street at a point where our new road will come 
into this thoroughfare. On motion made and seconded, 
it was 



2731 



Acceptance of 
Food Science 
& Technology 
Addition 



Land 
Acquisition 



Syrian Church 
Property 



H. E. Shaw 
Building 



Dziuba 
Property 



& i o,^ 



COMMITTEE 



Kelley 
Land 



Home 
Property 

Woynar 
Property 

Naming of 
High-Rise 
Residence 
Halls 



Traffic Rules 
& Regulations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that in accordance with Chapter 648, 
Acts of 1963, Item 8064-30, authorizing 
the Trustees of the University to acquire 
certain lands with the buildings thereon, 
for the development of the University, by 
purchase or by eminent domain under 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws and the 
authority granted therein, independent 
appraisals of the value of the land and 
buildings having been made by qualified 
disinterested appraisers, and filed with 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, on motion 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 
To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

VOTED : That, the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, all the 
property of Edward Dziuba, et al, situate 
in Amherst on Amity Street, Hampshire County, 
Massachusetts, and that the purchase price 
for said property be Twenty One Thousand 
($21,000.00) dollars. 

Kelley Land . This property is located on the east side 
Route 116 near the town of Amherst sewer plant. It is 
now desirable for the University to obtain this property 
which consists of a parcel of land of approximately 
7.917 acres for development of the athletic fields. 
The Treasurer was authorized by the committee to proceed 
to obtain appraisals. 

By way of information, Treasurer Johnson advised the 
committee that the courts had settled our taking of 
the Havre property of approximately 85 acres at 
$55,000 and the Woynar property at $19,100 near the 
southwest dining commons plus accrued interest. 

President Lederle introduced a memorandum from Dean of 
Students William F. Field which proposed a system of naming the 
five high-rise residence halls. This would consist of calling the 
first the Presidential Tower; the second, the Pioneer Tower; the 
third, the Patriot Tower; the fourth, the Embassy Tower; and the 
fifth, the Artists Tower. 

The committee took this matter under consideration and 
agreed to defer any action for further study and review. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of changes in the Motor Vehicle 
Regulations of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Amherst as detailed in Document 
66-088, which document is herewith attached 
to and made a part of these minutes. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Trustees next adjourned to attend the dedication 
luncheon for Chenoweth Laboratory, which event was held in the 
North Dining Commons. The meeting was reconvened by the Chairman 
at 2:00 p.m. 

In deference to Chancellor Ryan's schedule and the late- 
ness of the hour, item 7 was moved up on the agenda for considera- 
tion at this point. 

Chancellor Ryan stated that since we are behind schedule 
on a plan for a permanent campus, more temporary rental space will 
be required next year than had already been projected. There is 
actual need for this space right now. 

The Chancellor suggested using the present building as 
a basic unit for instruction and educational purposes, and putting 
ancillary services and functions into temporary rental space on the 
outside. This would have the effect of preserving present renova- 
tions in the main structure over reasonable time without "re- 
renovating . " 

Treasurer Johnson observed that we must give the faculty 
adequate office space. Chancellor Ryan noted also that the present 
fourth-floor library capacity is about 35,000 volumes, and we 
already have 32,000 volumes on hand or on order. The present UM/ 
Boston building simply does not have sufficient office space to 
provide for the 135 faculty members who will be there within 
months; additionally, 85 office spaces will be lost when phase II, 
Renovations , commences . 

Treasurer Johnson stated that the rental possibilities 
now being offered include (a) the Armory, (b) the American Mutual 
Insurance Building. 

After further discussion, it was agreed without vote to 
moved ahead and explore specific and comparative rental possibili- 
ties in both properties described above on the basis that the 
renters would renovate and provide utilities services. It was also 
decided to involve architects as consultants in determining the 
feasibility of both properties for use by the University. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that, in the latest view of 
I. M. Pei, architect for the University College project, September, 
1970, now appears to be a more feasible target date for opening the 
college. There remains the problem of financing classroom space, 
and construction costs are rising rapidly. The Treasurer noted 
that student room rates may have to increase in the future to 
accommodate these increased costs. 

The Treasurer stated that the "Campus Center Project" was 
the new name for what had been termed the "Continuing Education 
Center" . He stated that his office, in cooperation with the Uni- 
versity Building Authority, is studying the feasibility of 



27?° 



oo 



Additional 
Rental Space 
Re qui rement s , 
UM/Boston 



Progress 
Report - 
University 
College 



Campus Center 
Project 



2734 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



amortizing this project at approximately 11 million dollars. This 
appears possible. The Treasurer reported that architect Marcel 
Breuer states that he is now able to speed up the timetable, with 
possible completion by 1968. 



The meeting was adjourned at 




Robert/ J/. McCartney 
Secretary, BpgLrd of Trustees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

June 22, 1966, 12 noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, U of M 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy; President Lederle; Trustees 
Haigis, Lambson, Lyons; Provost Tippo; 
Secretary's Staff Assistant Miller. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Deans Kirshen, Moore, Spielinan; Professors 
Gluckstern, Mellen, Reber, Rhodes, Shapiro, 
Trueswell; Assistant to Provost Venman. 

Following an executive session of the committee, the 
meeting was called to order by Chairman Troy at 1:45 p.m. 

Revised and new course and program proposals were pre- 
sented. Following discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the new and revised courses 
as outlined in Document 66-087 which docu- 
ment is attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

Dr. Gluckstern, head of the Physics Department, presented 
a recommendation that the University petition to join Universities 
Research Association, Inc. (URA), which is considering increasing 
its membership from the present total of 34 member universities. 
URA has been formed to insure that a proposed 200 Bev high energy 
accelerator be truly a "national accelerator", and URA has offered 
its services to the Atomic Energy Commission as a managerial organL 
zation after a site for the 200 Bev accelerator has been selected. 
Among the criteria for membership is a willingness of each member 
to be assessed an amount not to exceed $100,000. He said at pre- 
sent each member has contributed only $5,000, and it is unlikely 
the full amount will ever be assessed. 

Primary advantage to the University joining URA lies in 
the association with prestigious universities in a scientific 
undertaking of major proportions. It would also afford the Uni- 
versity a voice in management of the new laboratory and strong 
support for the University in its scientific programs of high 
energy physics, nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, radiation 
biology, radiation medicine, applied mathemtics, computer science 
and other related areas. 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 



273: 



D 



Petition to 
Join UFA 



2730 



COMMITTEE 



Botany 

Department 

Candidate 



Ph.D. in 
Business Ad- 
ministration 



Ph.D. in 

Industrial 

Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposal that the Uni- 
versity petition to join the Universities 
Research Association, Inc. (URA). 

Professor Shapiro, head of the Botany Department, pre- 
sented the name of a prospective candidate who is prominent in the 
field of the physiology of plant tumor growth, a member of the 
National Academy of Sciences and an outstanding scientist. 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That ■> the recruitment of the distinguished 
scientist be continued in an affirmative 
manner by Professor Shapiro. 

Dean Kirshen of the School of Business Administration was 
introduced. Dean Kirshen presented background on the proposal to 
introduce a graduate program leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in Business Administration. It was emphasized that the 
faculty in Business Administration has been brought to the point 
where it is strong enough to enter the Ph.D. program, the program is 
not departmental but will be school-wide and interdisciplinary in 
nature. Harvard and M.I.T. have encouraged the University's School 
of Business Administration to embark on the Ph.D. program, which 
would start in September, 1967, with a minimum of 12 and a maximum 
of 15 students . 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposal to establish a 
Ph.D. in Business Administration as out- 
lined in Document 66-037 which document is 
attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

Professor Trueswell, chairman of the Industrial Engineering 
Department, presented the proposal for a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineer 
ing which, he said, would not be in full operation until September, 
1967. Much of the support for the program would come from the 
National Science Foundation through research grants and traineeships , 
with other supporting agencies lending support once the Ph.D. pro- 
gram is established. It was estimated that there would be 30 to 50 
graduate students in Industrial Engineering within a five-year pro- 
jection, with the majority pursuing the Ph.D. Without a Ph.D. pro- 
gram, it was pointed out, there is difficulty in recruiting faculty. 

Action on the proposal to establish a Ph.D. in Industrial 
Engineering was deferred until the next meeting of the Trustee Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



273? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The proposal to establish a Ph.D. in Polymer Science and 
Engineering was discussed. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposal to establish a 
Ph.D. in Polymer Science and Engineering 
as outlined in Document 66-087 which docu- 
ment is attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

Professor Reber, professor of food and nutrition in the 
School of Home Economics, gave background information on the pro- 
posal to establish an M.S. and a Ph.D. in Nutrition and Foods. 

Following further discussion, it was recommended that 
further action on the proposal to establish an M.S. and Ph.D. in 
Nutrition and Foods be deferred until the next meeting of the 
Trustee Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Dean Spielman of the College of Agriculture was introduced. 
He explained the need for a Ph.D. program in Forestry and Wildlife, 
stating that the Maclntyre-Stennis Bill strongly supports research 
and graduate vrork in forestry and wildlife, and that there is an 
urgent need for additional manpower and graduate personnel. 

Professor Rhodes, head of the Department of Forestry and 
Wildlife, stated that the department has grown slowly and steadily 
building up to a staff readiness for the Ph.D. program. The market 
for Ph.D.s in Forestry and Wildlife is increasing through demand of 
universities, agricultural experiment stations, federal agencies 
and the administrative staffing of federal agencies. 

Dean Spielman stated that professional schools provide the 
student with professional orientation, but more and more course 
work is taken in the basic sciences. 

Professor Rhodes said that initially there would be two or 
three Ph.D.s offered with additional growth anticipated in ensuing 
years. He explained that eight of the department's Master's degree 
candidates are going on to other schools to earn their Ph.D.s, and 
that potential prospects for advanced degrees have been lost because 
there is no Ph.D. now available in Forestry and Wildlife at the Uni- 
versity. 

The department has two cooperative, government-supported 
units in wildlife and fisheries which participate in the graduate 
program and make up five-eighths of the wildlife and fisheries 
faculty. A budget of about $130,000, supported wholly by the 
federal and state governments, make the wildlife and fisheries pro- 
gram possible to the University at a little cost. 



Ph.D. in 
Polymer Science 
& Engineering 



M.S. and Ph.D. 
in Nutrition 
and Foods 



2738 



COMMITTEE 



Ph.D. in 
Forestry and 
Wildlife 



Master's in 
Nursing Ad- 
ministration 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Other points made by Professor Rhodes were: The excellent 
physical plant, competency of the staff and $90,000 in assistant- 
ships of which eight per cent is underwritten by the University, and 
that there is no immediate need for additional funds to implement 
the Ph.D. program. He remarked that implementation of the Ph.D. 
program would tend to encourage the staff and make more and better 
use of the staff and facilities. 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimous ly 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposal to establish a 
Ph.D. in Forestry and Wildlife as outlined 
in Document 66-087 which document is 
attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

The proposal to establish a Master's Degree program in 
Nursing Administration was discussed. Upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposal to establish a 
Master's Degree program in Nursing Adminis- 
tration as outlined in Document 66-087 which 
document is attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

Action on the proposal to establish a M.S. ii Veterinary 
Hygiene was deferred until the next meeting of the Trustee Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 





.' M^ll eiC^S-^ 



Alan R. 
Secretary, pro tem 



COMMITTEE 



2739 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
June 29, 1966, 2:00 p.m., Room 442, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce and Maginnis; 
Provost Tippo, Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Dr. Mark Noff singer, Coordinator 
of Student Activities; Miss Helen 
Curtis, Dean of Women; William 
Barnard, Office of Dean of Students; 
Messrs. John Greenquist, Kenneth 
Hardy and Robert Labell; Carol 
Woodcock, Bette Butler and Susan 
Donnelley, student representatives. 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Lyons at 
2:00 p.m. He indicated that the purpose was to discuss proposed 
changes in certain student life arrangements on the campus, with 
particular reference to curfews and other matters outlined in a 
memorandum from the Administrative Committee on Student Life, 
1966, dated April 29, 1966. 

Mainly, these proposals called for making curfews 
optional in residence halls, for eliminating room inspections 
(except for special cause and under special circumstances); also, 
denying a student request for the establishment of parietals 
(periods when mixed sexes might visit each other in residence hall 
.rooms under prescribed circumstances), but recommending that 
calling hours for the opposite sex in designated public areas of 
each residence be determined by a majority vote of its residents; 
also that each house government establish its own quiet hours, 
typing and music hours, etc . , and that the roles of Head of Resi- 
dence and student counselors in respect to house government be 
advisory. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dr. Noff singer was 
invited to comment. He noted that parietals were not recommended 
by the committee; also that rules and regulations affecting stu- 
dent residence halls are not made by the students, or by a handful 
of administrators, but by the administration and by students to- 
gether, after proposals have been forwarded through proper 
channels, and after due consideration by appropriate committees. 

Dr. Noff singer pointed out that the Administrative 
Committee on Student Life, in recommending that curfews become 
optional in residence halls, had also called for each residence 
hall to be closed at certain specified hours each day: 12 mid- 
night on week days and 1:00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. The 
house would then not be re-opened until an agreed upon hour next 



Discussion of 
Proposed 
Regulations 
Changes in 
Student 
Residence Halls 



2740 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

morning. It was intended that these rules should involve fraterni- 
ties and sororities as well as the residence halls. By special 
arrangement on one or two major social weekends of the year, the 
house closing might be arranged at a later hour. He felt strongly 
that someone should be on duty and awake in each residence hall 
during the night, while the building is locked. Under present 
practice, no one is "on duty officially." 

Dean Curtis noted that men's residence halls are now open 
all night, but women's residence halls close at 11:00 p.m. and 
12:00 p.m. (12:00 p.m. for seniors), Monday through Thursday. The 
closing hours on Friday and Saturday are 1:00 a.m. 

Dr. Noffsinger stated that the proposed plan would add to 
control of the residence halls by placing on duty a so-called night 
"watchdog." This individual would not act as a disciplinarian, but 
rather as a night watchman. Upon inquiry it was disclosed that 41 
individuals would be required to cover all university residence 
halls on a 7-day basis. 

Chairman Lyons noted that this would be a substantial 
budget item, to be taken up with the administration. 

Discussion turned to practices at other universities. 
Dr. Noffsinger stated that night-time attendants at the University 
of Michigan were generally wives of faculty members and of graduate 
students. "We are aware that the curfew has ended up being the 
principal issue in this report," he said. "I believe that the best 
order imposed is that which is self-imposed." Dr. Noffsinger indi- 
cated that he has tried to share the decision-making process with 
the students. 

Chairman Lyons queried whether any exceptions were con- 
templated to the proposed rules, particularly with respect to fresh- 
man students. 

Dr. Noffsinger said he believed that freshman women should 
also be exempt from the house residence curfew, conceding that the 
concern of parents about this matter is justified and understandable 
"Some freshmen are mature," he said. "In other cases, senior 
students are not mature." 

Chairman Lyons invited Dean Curtis to comment. She stated 
that she has personally felt that curfews and some restrictions are 
desirable, and "is aghast" at the insistence of college students for 
change. Referring to the "new activism" among students, as it is 
called at national meetings of Deans of Students, she added that 
students today apparently wish to be treated as responsible young 
adults. Her own change of attitude came gradually, she said, and 
it developed in the light of this ground swell of "activism." 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"Given this new unrest, and faculty support for it, we 
have a different situation," Dean Curtis concluded. On this basis, 
she had given her approval to the recommendations contained in the 
committee report. She added that she was skeptical about the value 
of placing restrictions on freshmen, as this might give parents a 
"false sense of security." 

Chairman Lyons next invited comment from the women stu- 
dent representatives present. 

Miss Donnelley stated that, in her opinion, freshman 
women should have curfews imposed. "This helps to get the freshman 
woman oriented socially and academically," she said. She felt that 
this restriction should be imposed for the entire freshman year. 
"After one year, a person knows how much time it takes to study, 
how to regulate one's schedule, etc., and you've made a better 
adjustment to college life." 

Trustee Maginnis queried whether any relationship had 
been developed statistically between the removal of curfews at 
various institutions and added attrition rates among students. 
Dr. Noffsinger responded that he has not been able to find such a 
study, probably due to the fact that no control group is available 
against which to make a survey. 

Miss Butler observed that her viewpoint was identical to 
that expressed by Miss Donnelley. 

Miss Woodcock added that her opinion also agrees with 
that expressed by the previous two women students. She noted that 
women students in general do not experience attrition at the same 
rate as men students. As an indication of lack of maturity among 
freshmen, Miss Woodcock noted that 23.6% (the official, corrected 
figure is 23.2%) of the class of 1969 special summer freshman, group 
experienced attrition at the end of the second semester, rhey 
were also involved in "serious judicial problems while they were 
at Orchard Hill last summer," Miss Woodcock added. In her opinion, 
the curfew should be extended into the sophomore year. 

Provost Tippo observed that the summer freshman group 
tended to be a bit more marginal than those students admitted to 
the full-year academic program each fall. 

Assistant Dean Barnard commented that he feels com- 
pletely in line with the report of the Administrative Committee on 
Student Life, as presented. 

Mr. Greenquist cited meetings by the University Reform 
Committee as the originating source of the "no-curfew" idea. He 
cited also a report of the Women's Affairs Committee of the Student 
Senate, calling for the establishment of parietals. He stated 
that the student committee had operated on the basis of "get a 
piece at a time psychology", adding that he could not personally 



2741 



Comments by 
Women Student 
Representatives 



Comments by 
Male Student 
Representatives 



2742 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

see airy "adjustment differential" between men and women freshmen, 
any more than he could see justification for curfews on women when 
they are not in effect for men students. He concluded that 70% of 
the women students polled had registered anti-curfew feeling, and 
that the "no curfew" proposal had received faculty support. 

Provost Tippo stated, however, that no official action 
had been taken on this matter by the faculty; also that the regis- 
tration of some faculty approval certainly did not constitute a 
majority opinion. 

Mr. Greenquist observed that most students were in favor 
of parietals. The Student Life Committee had recommended their 
establishment to the administration. The proposed times would be 
1:00 - 7:00 p.m. on Sunday; Saturday hours would be set by the house 
residences. 

Dr. Noffsinger expressed the view that the establishment 
of parietals between 1:00 and 7:00 p.m. on Sunday constituted "an 
invasion on privacy. " 

Mr. Hardy said the fact that house residences will be 
locked at twelve or one o'clock practically constitutes a curfew. 
He expressed concern about the cost of implementing the house 
monitoring program, which he understood ranged somewhere between 
sixty and seventy thousand dollars. 

President Lederle questioned whether the allocation of 
approximately $76,000 (a more nearly accurate cost of implementing 
the no-curfew program) to satisfy a few individuals who wished to 
stay out late was a proper use of funds. The money could better be 
spent, he said, on house residence enrichment programs which would 
involve all students. 

Mr. Labell noted that students had become "activist" on 
the question of curfews on the basis that this increased their 
"responsibility." He felt that the investment of university funds 
to implement this responsibility would be entirely worth while. 

The Provost queried whether the students would be willing 
to finance the program. Mr. Labell responded that one recommenda- 
tion of the Women's Affairs Committee was that they would be will- 
ing to pay for the services of a "roving watchman", who, presumably, 
would cover several buildings. It was not indicated, how many 
roving watchmen would be required to service the entire house 
residence complex of the campus. Mr. Greenquist added, however, 
that he was not at all certain that 4-1 persons would be required. 

Dr. Noffsinger stressed that, when the Administrative 
Committee presented its proposal to Dean Field, it had offered an 
honest and above-board, clear-cut package which did not recommend 
roving watchmen. Instead, the report called for full-time people 
on duty. 



COMMITTEE 



2743 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Greenquist stated that the sum of $76,000 would 
guarantee more than simply curfew service; it would also guarantee 
safety and theft protection for the residence halls. 

President Lederle observed that it is possible to 
guarantee house protection by means of roving watchmen. In terms 
of access to houses after closing hours, it might be possible to 
have a car or bus go from the Student Union every hour or so, de- 
livering students to the residence halls. He repeated that there 
were many demands on university dollars, and that it appeared to 
him that $76,000 would be far better invested in enrichment of 
the university residence hall program. He noted that it was diffi- 
cult to obtain policemen and other security personnel at the 
present time; the Legislature provides dollars for faculty, rather 
than for police protection. In his view, the problem needed to be 
solved at far less cost than the projected $76,000 figure. 

Trustee Maginnis noted that the problem has two 
different aspects: curfew service and house protection. In the 
event of fire or other calamity, the public would demand to know, 
"what have you been doing about it." (House protection). 

It was noted by Messrs. Hardy and Greenquist that, if 
the abolition of curfews is accepted by the University, then some 
system will have to be worked out to guarantee its successful 
operation. 

Miss Butler stated that she does not have much faith in 
a faculty wife or graduate student wife exerting effective control, 
in the event that a band of rowdies were bent on entering the 
house or the residence hall and inflicting damage. The real 
question here is, she said, "how do you get people in?" 

President Lederle responded that we are understaffed for 
protection in all buildings at the present time. He cited damage 
to vending machines and other residence hall property as an 
example. At the same time, the President said, we have a practical 
problem of finding $76,000 to implement the program, and we simply 
do not have it. Dr. Noff singer commented that this is one of the 
realities we have to face. 

Trustee Maginnis observed that he was impressed by the 
30% of women students who do not wish to have curfews removed, 
rather than by the 70% who do. 



Dean Curtis said that the Committee was aware of the ex- 
pense involved when the report was presented to the administration. 
She feels that student morale is very important, particularly this 
year. President Lederle observed that the report as presented to 
him had been approved by the administration only "in principle." 
No facts and figures with respect to costs had been presented along 
with the recommendations, "and we now face the real difficulty of 
finding the money." 



2744 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Labell called attention to the fact that in items 3 
and 4 of the committee report (on parietal hours and calling hours 
for the opposite sex in designated public areas), reference is made 
to "a majority vote of the women's residence halls," with respect 
to activation. He recommended that activation be left in the hands 
of the "democratically elected house government" called for in 
section 8 of the report. 

Dr. Noffsinger observed that students will have to live 
with and accept the realities of the situation with respect to any 
article in the report. "We have already told the students," he said 
"that we could not implement these recommendations by summer school, 
1966, as the students originally proposed; also, that it might take 
a year or two . " 

Trustee Croce offered the alternative suggestion that the 
expense might be reduced through designating only two or three 
nights a week as "curfew free" occasions, and that these then might 
be extended to include the full week later on. Miss Woodcock added 
that this had been considered earlier in the year in the form, for 
example, of establishing a senior dormitory without curfews. 
Dr. Noffsinger responded, however, that this did not seem practical 
as it would lead to "draining" seniors and juniors from the house 
residence hall mix with resultant privation upon sophomores and f re st 
men jvho would be isolated from the good example which seniors 
and juniors currently set in the residence halls. 

It was noted, if the program should be approved on the 
basis of applying curfews to freshmen only, that this could be con- 
trolled in mixed residence halls by the creation of a sign-out 
system which Dr. Noffsinger said would be implemented. 



point. 



All persons present by invitation left the meeting at this 



There followed discussion between the Trustees and members 
of the administration with respect to future direction of the Uni- 
versity on the items proposed in the committee report. 

The substance of this discussion was that "national 
pressures" seem to dictate that we should move in the direction of 
liberalizing house residence rules; also, that applying such rules 
to both men and women students should at least be considered; also 
that a consensus favored retaining curfews on freshman women. It 
was restated that male students have not had house restrictions for 
the past several decades, and that any imposition of such regula- 
tions would undoubtedly lead to protest. 

It was observed that too much emphasis should not be 
placed on the results of student petitions which are signed usually 
under a particular form of social pressure. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President re-emphasized that he had approved of the 
recommendations in the committee report only in principle, and that 
support papers were promised which would cost out the program and 
add other details necessary for implementation. To date these 
addenda have not been forwarded to the administration. 

It was agreed that the subject of the committee's de- 
liberation was basically an administrative matter, and should not 
be put to a vote of the full Board of Trustees. 

The meeting concluded with a brief report by President 
Lederle and Provost Tippo on progress of the Commission on Student 
Publications, consisting of six members of the faculty together 
with six members designated by the Student Senate. The President 
indicated that he was most hopeful that a board of student publica- 
tions will be recommended by the Commission. 

Provost Tippo assured the Committee that when the 
Commission on Student Publications has completed its studies and 
review, it will report its conclusions as developed to the Committed 
on Student Activities of the Board of Trustees. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:05 p.m. 




2745 



Robert ft] McCartney" 
Secretary, (Board of Trustees 



2746 



COMMITTEE 



Report of 
Investment 
Counsel as 
of April 1, 
1966 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

June 29, 1966, 4:00 p.m., Chancellor's Conference 
Room, UMass/Boston 



PRESENT: Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustee Healey, Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Messrs. Wood and Ladd of Standish, 
Aye'r & Wood, Inc., Investment 
Counselors . 



The meeting was called to order at 4:00 p.m. by Chairman 
Pumphret. Messrs. Wood and Ladd of the firm of Standish, Ayer & 
Wood, Inc. were invited to report on the Endowment Fund and the 
Operating Fund of the University. As noted in their "Report on 
Endowment Fund and Operating Fund of the University of Massachusetts 
as of April 1, 1966," Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. comment that the 
economy continues to move ahead, stimulated by strong consumer 
spending, a high rate of capital expenditures, and heavy federal 
welfare and defense outlays. The principal difficulty at this 
juncture is the danger of "overheating." The economy is, however, 
developing many of the imbalances which have typically preceded 
previous business adjustments. 

The report continued that there have been relatively few 
changes in the composition of the Endowment Fund in the past six 
months. While income has increased, the market value of the port- 
folio has declined, largely as a reflection of the weakness in 
utility stocks and other high-grade defensive issues. In the 
opinion of counsel, however, this phenomenon does not indicate any 
change in the favorable prospects of the University's holdings. To 
the contrary, the performance of our commitments reflect the 
market's attention to the more speculative stocks which they con- 
sider inappropriate for a fund of this nature. Investment 
counselors see no important problems developing at this time. 

Status of the Endowment Fund as of April 1, 1966, as well 
as portfolio distribution in bonds and common stocks, are contained 
in the "Report on Endowment Fund and Operating Fund of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts as of April 1, 1966, " on file in the 
Treasurer's Office. 

There followed a discussion on the proposal of investment 
counsel and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the changes in 
orders in the University's investment portfolio 
as recommended by Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. 



274 



ry 



cd 

CO 

o 

8* 

u 
P-. 

■a 

o 

CQ 
°3 

CO 

o 
o 
-p 
CO 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CO 

o P 



cd cd 

cd cd cd cd 

<ij <j <j <t; <t; 



cd cd 
cd cd cd 





Pi 
















HVt 


■65. 


^5. 


■fe?. 


CQ 
<S) 
•H 
■P 


CO 












O 


-P 


O O O «A o o 


O 


[> o c^ic 


•H 


CD 












■P 


•H 


O D- rH CM ifA O 


to 


CM C^vO 


Nt 


rH 


> 














rH 


• ■ • • • m 


• 


• • • 


• 


•H 


B 












• 


9 


«A Nj- «A UA «A -stj -vi" 


UA UA UA| ITA 


-P 


M 












H 

rX 


■P 










P3 














3 










-P 
CQ 

cd 

cu 














Pi 


0) 


O O CM vD ifA O 


CA 


O O O 


o 


O 


to £> 


in 


CM PA CM 


ES 




o 


B 


ICA \D \0 Nf C'AO 


UA 


ir\ i> ir\ 


t> 


^ 


CD 


sQ 


to CM 


O 


PA PAvO 


CM 




p^ 


o 


I> O ^J-rH rH rH 


vO 


O O rH 


CM 


-p 


e 


PA 


CM to 


NT 


rH -vJ-CS 


o 




n 


o 


•* 


•^ 


•v *s • 


•s 


^ 


o 






•\ 








c 


Pi 


H 


CM 


r-i r-i i-i 


Cr\ 


o 


c 






rH 








o 


rH 


Cft- 


€f> 


69- 


69- 


s 


69- 




69- 


m- 


69- 














o 


H 






















CQ 


cd 
















O «A O O O O 


UA 


fAO O 


ifA 


CU 


CO 
















P 


O t> O "A vD O 


to 


CM UA «A 


3 


in 



















CD 


itA CN C^ t)0 t> «A 


CM 


OHO 


cd 


p 


CU 












rH 




M 


•V ^ »\ *\ •% • 


•\ 


•V *\ • 


•t 


,a 


o 


pi 












cd 




U 


O C^ O CM CM CM 


O 


OO o 


O 


CO 


f-l 


rH 


OO Cvl 


CM 


o o o 


O 


CO 




cc> 


rH CM 


vO 


r-H CM CM 


\D 




Ph 


a 


O \0 t> 


PA 


ua o o 


ITA 


o 




^ 


e& 


eg- 


&9- 


&9- 


CM 




> 


CM 


PA O 


\D 


vo c m 


H 


p 












q 


A 




•ti 


»\ • 


•S 


•\ •* • 


•A 


s 












H 


o 


• 


f- t)C 


rH 


O^IA 


H 












rH 


o 


P 




H rH 


■st 


rH H rH 


-vt 


a. 








ai^i- Nf 






-p 


'<, 


£9- 




69- 


69- 


69- 














fH 


CO 


§ 












-a 




CD 






UA Cn rH 




O 














a 




O 


h](Mt-i|(M 








<H 


Pi 












o 




•<->. 


t> C^v C»A tfA <M O 




a^o o 






o 












CQ 




a. 


O O O O O O 




oo o 

rH rH 




• 

O 


o 
























O 


o 


CU 
























P 


o 


MD 


rH Os 




m O CM 


















^ 


•H 


PA 


UA -sf 




UA \£) \0 










to (^ 




to 




M 


u 








PA 












vD 




•H 


Ph 


















\ \to 




\ 




r-H 


















iTvCMHN, 
H 0\rH!> 




Cr\ 

rH CM 




o 


















CO UA rH C>\ 




!> rH\ 




•H 




















1 C- \D 




U 




*-^ 
















vO 1 




P 






O 














\t0 tO\"feS. 




O rH 




o 






to 














-J" tO \\C\ Nf 




>^ 




^ 




*~^ 


• 














\ «A £> 






rH 




O 


O'-- 














C^A <§) 




\K\C\ 




w 




to 


wCM 














■n|<r NT -<r^|c\J 




■>? H 








« 


ir\ 














C^\ Ni" -<t m 




\UA 




T3 




rH 


cd • 














. . o .cj o "c 




sir 




in 




**_x 


O CM 
















H-* • 




O 


1 




•H **-"• 




ua 










co co co O -H cd 




-it -P 




iH 


> 


c 


?H 




■^-tf 










cd cd -H S <H cq 




UA U 




-P 


•H 


o 


CU • 




pa . 










CD a> T3 -H 
Sh U h cd o co 




Pi Cr\ CD 




rH 


T3 


CQ 


(3 H 




!> rH 












o • o 




cd 


N^ 


•H 


<q 














Eh Eh ?h cd M 
• cd Cm B 




co m 




W 




10 


En 




H W 













•H 






92 


H 


=h 




S_^^— s. 








3 


• • co ba -H 
co co c cd • >• 




-dHf 




CO 


3 




o • 




^— "S • 








to 




W -H U 




CD 


CO 


■a 


W 




O >> CO 








re 


• • O -H o cd 




O cd 




rH 


CO 


CU 


• • 




Nf CD cd 








M 


DDOZIMW 




Ph 




cd 


H 


p 


& S 




* 5 ^ 












g "^ 




X! 




cd 




Nf S o 












H rH <i2 




CQ 




T3 


8g 




— <■ CD ^- ' 












o dl 








•H 




a, 








o o o o o o 




O O S 




O 




rH 


<y 




«• ^ 








o o o o o o 




C^ 




to 




O 


o & 




S • <D 








H 


O O O O O «A 








CA 




CO 


•H P 




•ON 








H 


•\ *v *^ »\ «s •> 




O O o 








a 


T3 p! 




CQ -H 








a) 


O «A O C"\ C^A CM 




o o o 




CD 




o 
o 


cd O 
w co 




• • <H 
M l-D P-i 








CO 


CM CM rH 




o o o 




| 




















p>1o o o 




cd 




















cq|CM CM CM 




rS 
















O O O O O CM 








o 
















o o o o o C^ 








M 


H 
















id 


O O O O O O 




TJI 




CD 


H 


o 


o to 


1 


HO O O 






£ 


rH 


•\ »s •* *s •* •- 




& H 






CU 


O vD CM 




:flr«A ua ua 






o 


a 


iAOO c*a cr\ ir\ 




O O 1 1 1 




O 




CO 


CM 


PA PA 


(5 


h| CM CM 






B 


X 


SflfMH 




S3 ffi 




Eh 



2748 



COMMITTEE 



New Endowment 
Fund - E. W. 
Eldridge, Jr. 
Memorial Fund 



Unrestricted 
Endowment 
Fund Income 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That , the re be and hereby is delegated to the 
Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, for the time being in 
office the power and authority, to be exercised 
only with the concurrence of the Finance 
Committee of the Trustees, such concurrence to 
be expressed by a writing signed by the members 
of the Finance Committee at the time being in 
office or by a vote passed at a regularly called 
and held meeting of the Finance Committee, to 
invest and reinvest the endowment funds and 
trust funds of the University of Massachusetts 
and, in that connection, to purchase, sell and 
otherwise deal in and with securities of all 
kinds and to make deposits in and withdrawals 
from accounts in the name of the University or 
of any special endowment or trust fund or funds 
and that it be and hereby is declared to be the 
judgment of the Trustees that the delegation of 
authority hereby made is necessary or desirable. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson re- 
ported on the establishment on May 5, 1966, of the E. W. Eldridge, 
Jr. Memorial Fund as a temporary trust fund, functioning as endow- 
ment to record the receipts of gifts and donations from members of 
the General Electric Company in memory of Everett W. Eldridge, Jr. 
of Bridgeport, Connecticut, a member of the Class of 1939. Condi- 
tions of the gift were described in detail. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the E. W. Eldridge, Jr. Memorial Fund be 
established as an Endowment Fund for the 
purpose of awarding annually one or more 
scholarships out of the income to students 
enrolled in a course of study in Economics, 
or an equivalent course of study; awards 
shall be made by the upperclass sub-committee 
of the University Committee on Financial Aid 
and Scholarships, upon the basis of scholastic 
achievement and financial need. Any excess 
income shall be added to the principal. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded members of the Committee that 
authorization in past years had been given to appropriate a certain 
amount from the income in the following unrestricted endowment 
funds: Burnham, Sessions, Wheeler and Frederick H. Reed for the use 
of the President at his discretion during the fiscal year. A 
summary of the income is as follows: 



$ 


9-41.88 




290 


.92 


1 


,227 


44 




584 


.?2 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Fund Balance 

Burnham Emergency Fund 
Frederick H. Reed Fund 
William Wheeler Fund 
William R. Sessions Fund 

Total $3,044.76 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
there be appropriated from the income from 
the Burnham, Wheeler, Sessions and Frederick 
H. Reed funds a sum not to exceed $3,000 to 
be available for the use of the President 
at his discretion during the period July 1, 
1966 to June 30, 1967, and for such purposes 
as he may deem to be in the interest of the 
University. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, the Trust Fund 
Operating Budget was presented to the Committee by Treasurer 
Johnson. The Treasurer stated that, except for minor variations, 
the Trust Fund Operating Budgets were approximately as they were 
for the past fiscal year. He called attention to the Trust Fund 
Interest Budget, noting that $175,000 would be available in the 
various accounts between July 1, 1966 and June 30, 1967. 

Mr. Johnson also focused on the Research Trust Fund, 
noting that the University Press item had been cut by $25,000 this 
year, in view of their access to additional funds through sales; 
also that the Research Computer Center had been advanced from 
$75,000 to $125,000. In total, the sum of $400,000 is available 
in this budget for the period July 1, 1966 to June 30, 1967. 

With respect to the rest of the report, the Treasurer 
noted that the Boarding Hall budget shows a $150,000 deficit to 
come out of the reserve. The planned deficit results from the 
usual "shakedown" in opening a new facility. This is a normal 
situation, and recovery can be expected. 

At this point, the members of the Committee reviewed the 
highlights of the report budget by budget. Treasurer Johnson ex- 
plained how each budget had been put together and responded to 
questions by members of the Committee. The Chairman indicated 
that it would be desirable to have the full Board of Trustees given 
a summary of background on how the budget is assembled. It was 
agreed without vote to recommend the report on Trust Fund Operating 
Budgets to the Board of Trustees at its meeting on June 30, 1966. 

Chairman Pumphret observed that it would be a good idea 
in the weeks ahead to have the Trustees consider where the overall 
program of the University is going in the future. This would 



2749 



Trust Fund 

Operating 

Budgets 



2750 



COMMITTEE 



Master Plan 
for Univer- 
sity Growth 



University 
Fund Expendi- 
tures Report: 
June 1, 1965- 
June 30, 1966 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

include projections on enrollment, pro- 

grams of study, and all phases of development on the various 
campuses. 

Trustee Healey noted that he was about to recommend that 
the Board of Trustees ' Executive Committee become an ad hoc special 
committee to review all of the plans of the University for future 
growth. As the Board's delegate to the new Board of Higher Educa- 
tion, he is aware that they will take some time in getting 
organized and then must turn to the various educational units in 
the Commonwealth for guidance and direction. "We need to know what 
the University at Amherst, Boston and Worcester will be like in 
five years' time and beyond," he said. 

After brief discussion, it was agreed that the University 
administration would prepare details of a master plan covering 
enrollment, programs of study and cost figures related to both 
which would be taken up at a meeting of the Executive Committee in 
September. The details would be forwarded to the Board of Higher 
Education for their consideration in October. The Higher Education 
Board will report by mandate to the Governor in November, 1966. 

Copies of the University Fund expenditures for the period 
July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 having been provided to members of ths 
Committee on Finance for their information, no further review was 
considered necessary at this time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:10 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretin 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
June 30, 1966, 9:30 a.m., Chancellor's Conference Room, UM/Boston 



PRESENT : Vice-Chairman Healey, President 

Lederle, Trustees Emerson, Haigis, 
Iyons, Pumphret and Troy; Provost 
Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Secretary 
McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Dean Warren McGuirk, Associate 
Dean David Bischoff and Pro- 
fessor Matthew Zunic, all of 
the School of Physical Education. 

In the absence of the Chairman, the meeting was called 
to order by Vice-Chairman Healey at 9:30 a.m. 

Chancellor Ryan was invited to explain the purpose of a 
requested addition of $10.00 per semester at UM/Boston for a stu- 
dent health fee. The Chancellor stated that approximately one- 
third of the students seen by the part-time physician at UM/Boston 
have no personal family physician or they come from families and 
homes where there is no family physician. 

The Chancellor added that it was imperative to have a 
full-time physician at UM/Boston this coming year. He recommended 
also the appointment of a part-time psychiatrist along with a 
full-time and a half-time nurse in order to provide adequate 
emergency and basic health care for students enrolled on the 
campus. He indicated that the proposed fee would materialize 
approximately $35,000, and that the proposed budget for pro- 
fessional services should stay within that figure. 

It was agreed that the matter would be reported to the 
full Board of Trustees at its meeting this afternoon. 

A letter from Professor Matthew Zunic of the School of 
Physical Education having been forwarded to all members of the 
Board of Trustees referring to his dissatisfaction at not having 
received merit increases since 1963, also requesting an audience 
with the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees relative to 
this matter, Professor Zunic was invited by Trustee Healey to 
state his case informally. 

There followed an extensive development of Professor 
Zunic 's professional career at the University in which he indi- 
cated that he had been hired as a basketball coach, that he has his 
Bachelor's degree in Physical Education, and that he feels a 
pattern of "discrimination against me" dating from the time that 
he was removed as basketball coach for a number of causes, in- 
cluding the use of profane language. 



2751 



Student 
Health Fee - 
UM/Boston 



Petition of 
Professor 
Matthew Zunic 






2752 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Stating that he feels his professional reputation is at 
stake, and that he is "as ambitious as the next person," Professor 
Zunic made his appeal basically for equal consideration in the 
award of merit increases in the future. 

Professor Zunic was warned by the Committee that it would 
not be possible at this time to "re-try" the question of his re- 
moval as basketball coach, since this was the subject of a previous 
hearing before the Executive Committee several years ago. He was 
also cautioned to focus on the present subject of his dissatis- 
faction, rather than to recount at great length the details of his 
professional career, as the time of the Committee was limited. 

Professor Zunic stated that he is the lowest paid full 
professor on the campus. This comment was refuted by Provost Tippo 
quoting from personnel records of the University. It was also 
brought out that Professor Zunic has been afforded an opportunity 
to engage in summer school teaching so that his total annual income 
exceeds that which he earns on a ten-month basis as a full professor 

Professor Zunic also stated that he now intends to im- 
prove himself by working on a master's degree at Westfield State 
College. He expects award of the degree in the spring of 1967. 

After affording Professor Zunic an opportunity to express 
himself fully, the Committee received his thanks for their courtesy 
and attention. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:25 a.m. 





McCartney 
Board of Trustl 



es 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

July 28, 1966, 10:00 a.m., Main Conference Room, UM/Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, Provost Tippo; 

Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Solomon, 
Rowland, Croce; Chancellor Ryan, 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean Soutter of the Medical 
School and Dr. Venman, 
Provost's Office. 



At the invitation of Chairman Troy, Chancellor Ryan pre- 
sented documents in support of his request for approval of new 
courses in the areas of humanities, social science, mathematics 
and natural science at the University of Massachusetts/Boston. 

These courses are consistent with the following guide- 
lines under which the 1965-66 program of instruction was developed 
at the Boston campus: 

1. The freshman- sophomore academic program 
would be composed of a 4-course semester 
for the student, with four credits per 
course . 

2. The junior-senior program would be com- 
posed primarily of a 5-course semester 
for the student, with three credits per 
course. 

3. The curriculum would be developed to pro- 
vide for courses of study permitting 
majors in: 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Economics (also Business Administration) 

English 

History 

Languages - French, German, Italian, Russian, 

Spanish 
Mathematics 
Philosophy 
Physics 
Politics 
Social Relations 






Course 

Proposals 

UM/Boston 



2754 



COMMITTEE 



Graduate 
Proposals 



Ph.D. in 

Industrial 

Engineering 



M.S. in 

Veterinary 

Hygiene 



M.S. & Ph.D. 
Degrees in 
Nutrition 
and Foods 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chancellor indicated that the course proposals had 
been screened by division committees and then by division chairmen 
who sent the pruned -down version of the request to the Academic 
Affairs Committee. The courses were then approved by a general 
faculty meeting. In this manner, the original number requested was 
reduced to 104. 

It was noted that three new language studies will be introf 
duced: Italian, Russian and Greek. The Chancellor stated, however, 
that not all of the new courses will be offered this fall or even 
in the coming academic year. After brief further discussion and 
upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of courses of instruction at 
the University of Massachusetts/Boston 
as summarized in Document 67-003, which 
document will now be forwarded to the 
full Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Troy noted that certain proposals for additional 
degrees in the Graduate School had been postponed from the previous 
meeting. 

After brief discussion during which Provost Tippo indi- 
cated that Dean Picha of the School of Engineering favors adoption 
of the proposed Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering, and upon motion 
made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Ph.D. degree in Industrial 
Engineering be approved and established 
in the School of Engineering as detailed 
in Document 67-004, which document will 
now be forwarded to the full Board of 
Trustees. 

Discussion followed on a proposal to establish an M.S. 
degree in Veterinary Hygiene. Provost Tippo explained that nine or 
ten interested individuals are on hand who would participate in 
such a program at any given time. Trustee Solomon queried whether 
the program should not be given in biological sciences. 

After further questions were raised concerning the pro- 
gram, it was agreed to defer action on this proposal until the 
Veterinary Science personnel have an opportunity to explain in 
greater detail the necessity for this degree. 

Provost Tippo reminded the committee that details on pro- 
posed M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Nutrition and Foods had been pre- 
sented at the last meeting by Professor Reber of the School of Home 
Economics. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve and establish M.S. and Ph.D. 
degree programs in Nutrition and Foods, as 
detailed in Document 67-005, which document 
will now he forwarded to the full Board of 
Trustees. 

Provost Tippo next presented some background material on 
personnel matters which would come to the attention of the full 
Board of Trustees at their meeting of August 11, 1966. 

The Provost commented on the extensive search which had 
been conducted over some period of time to secure a department head 
in Agricultural and Food Economics. As the result of this exten- 
sive search, he proposed for this position Dr. Jean Wyckoff of the 
University of Nevada. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they confirm and approve the appointment of 
Dr. Jean Wyckoff as Head of the Department 
of Agricultural and Food Economics at a 
salary of $19, 500 per annum on a 12-month 
basis, with tenure as Professor of Agri- 
cultural Economics. 

Dean Soutter of the Medical School described for the 
committee the extensive search which had been made for a Director 
of the University Hospital. Finally, he is prepared to recommend 
for this post Mr. John Stockwell, a native of Boston, a graduate 
of Dartmouth and of the University of Minnesota School for Hospital 
Directors. 

Dean Soutter detailed some of Mr. Stockwell 's experience 
including his administrative residency at Rhode Island Hospital, 
his work at Childrens Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, where he 
re-established the business operation on a sound basis; also, his 
latest work in Minnesota where he has been cooperating in the con- 
struction of a hospital. 

After further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they confirm and approve the appointment of 
Mr. John Stockwell as Director of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Hospital; Associate 
Dean for Administrative Affairs and Associate 
Professor of Hospital Administration, Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts School of Medicine 
at a salary of $25,000, (contingent upon 
passage of the salary relief bill currently 
before the Legislature.) 






Department 
Head, Agri- 
cultural and 
Food Economics 



Director, 
University 
Hospital, 
Medical School 



2756 



Other 
Business 



COMMITTEE 



High-rise 

dormitories 

named 



Low-rise 

dormitories 

named 

Founding 

Convocation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo commented briefly on a memorandum dated 
June 20, 1966 from Dean of Students William Field proposing certain 
names for Southwest Complex high-rise and low-rise residence halls. 
He indicated that this was provided for information only, and that 
the matter would go to the full Board of Trustees in August after 
review by the Buildings and Grounds Committee. 

Essentially, as revised, the proposal would call for 
naming the five high-rise buildings after each President of the 
United States who went to office from Massachusetts (John Adams, 
John Quincy Adams, Calvin Coolidge, John F. Kennedy) and for George 
Washington who took command of the continental army in this state. 

Low-rise residence halls would be named for Professors 
Patterson, Mackimmie, Prince and Crampton. 

Chancellor Ryan noted that the University of Massachusetts! 
Boston founding convocation would be held on Saturday, October 1, 
1966. Additional details would be provided to the Board of Trustees 
as soon as speaking invitations have been accepted and confirmed and 
alternate sites for the event have been reviewed and decided upon. 

The Chancellor next provided the committee with an in- 
formal review of the admissions picture for UM/Boston for the coming 
year. He indicated that approximately 34-00 applications had been 
received this year; 2200 students were admitted, and approximately 
1100 have paid the first fee. Approximately 25% of the enrollment ih 
the past year came from Boston proper; 75% from the suburbs. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 





Robert J/./ McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trust 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

August 2, 1966, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, UM/Araherst 

PRESENT: Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Croce, Emerson, 
Maginnis and McMamara; Provost 
Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Dean of Students William Field; 
Messrs. Robert Gailey and Per 
Nylen, Fraternity Park Project. 



Chairman Lyons indicated that the agenda would consist of 
a discussion on the proposed privately sponsored Fraternity and 
Sorority Park; also proposed regulations with respect to student 
residence halls, including curfews. He invited the Dean of Stu- 
dents to comment on the fraternity-sorority proposal. 

Dean Field recounted the history of Board of Trustee 
action on establishing a formal residence area for fraternities and 
sororities dating from 1956. In that year, the Board voted to set 
aside a portion of the campus for this purpose. The plan did not 
work out. It was indicated in 1962, however, that the University, 
in cooperation with the Town of Amherst, would encourage develop- 
ment by private enterprise of an area for fraternity-sorority 
residences including appropriate fire, construction and housing 
standards. Due to the steady increase in land prices and revised 
zoning regulations, it was difficult for fraternities and sorori- 
ties to find locations to meet their needs. 

For some time, the Office of the Dean of Students has 
been putting pressure on fraternities and sororities to get out of 
old, undesirable houses and to build new, permanent facilities 
that incorporate acceptable standards. 

At this time, there is a proposal by a private corpora- 
tion of fraternities and sororities to establish a Fraternity Park 
across East Pleasant Street, with the individual capacities and 
house design subject to approval by the University; also with a 
definite prospect that six more fraternities and sororities may 
move there during the first year. A total of twelve may be located 
on the site by the second year. 

The University Greek system is divided into eight 
sororities and fifteen fraternities, and students may reside in the 
houses, once pledged, any time after the first semester. 

Discussion followed in which it was pointed out that many 
fraternities, in the past, have not been in the most acceptable 
financial condition; also, that complaints have been raised in the 



275? 



Proposed 
Fraternity 
& Sorority 
Park 



ry\-y 



> 7 > \"< 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

community concerning the condition and maintenance of structures de- 
voted to fraternity and sorority use on North Pleasant Street and 
Sunset Avenue. Over the past few years there has been a decline 
from 33% to 16-20% residency in Greek dwellings, compared with the 
total campus population. 

By action of the Board of Trustees in 1957, setting a I960 
deadline, discrimination clauses have been eliminated from all 
fraternities and sororities at the University of Massachusetts. 

With respect to scholarship, the sororities maintain a 
reasonably high level. Fraternities, however, have not met this 
standard and last year fell below the whole University average. In 
response to queries by the Chairman, it was brought out that the 
University does not guarantee any bank loan obtained by a fraternity 
or sorority; also, that the University holds two mortgages on 
fraternities as a heritance from the past, when this condition was 
more widespread. Current Trustee policy is that the University will 
not assume further financial obligations related to the fraternity 
system. 

At this point, Messrs. Robert Gailey, faculty adviser to 
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, and Mr. Per Nylen, prof essional land- 
scape architect, were invited into the meeting to present for review 
their plans for the proposed Fraternity Park. 

Mr. Gailey traced the history of the project, dating from 
October, 1965. Originally a site of 3S acres in the Town of Hadley 
was considered, but this proved unfeasible due to soil conditions 
and commercial zoning. 

At the present time, the plot under consideration is land 
held by Mr. Richard Nelson on East Pleasant Street. Fifty- three to 
fifty-five acres are involved. 

The Fraternity Park is being developed by a private 
corporation, with all fraternities and sororities at the University 
eligible for membership. Only fraternity and sorority funds are 
being employed, and the corporation functions essentially as a non- 
profit organization. Any fraternity or sorority may gain a seat on 
the board of directors by advancing the lot purchase price of $30,00(1) 
Three trustees elected by the Board of Directors function as a voting; 
trust. The trust will exercise the voting rights of the corporation 
It is expected that the sum of $4.00,000 will be required to purchase 
and develop the site. 

Treasurer Johnson stressed that the University is not in- 
volved in any way with this proposal, and that the corporation 
functions entirely as a private venture. 

Mr. Nylen was then invited to display sketches outlining 
the master plan. He indicated that the site was very choice; also, 
that lots would be restricted to approximately 1.2 acres apiece. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Recreation and parking space is provided for, and this will be 
maintained by the corporation. Recreation areas include two intra- 
mural football fields and three intramural softball fields, 
although one of the latter may be converted to a pond area. 

Greek houses will have first choice of lots in the order 
in which they make purchase. 

Trustee Croce pointed out, in the event of a fraternity 
or sorority defection, that the property might be secured if the 
corporation is able to control the utilities. The Trustees also 
suggested that an indiscriminate "sprinkling around" of fraterni- 
ties and sororities might be undesirable, and that a clustering of 
fraternities and sororities into separate areas might prove de- 
sirable . Further discussion ensued with respect to technical 
problems in handling utilities on the site, and it was reported 
that the matter would be taken up with the Town of Amherst planning 
committee on Wednesday, August 3, 1966. 

Chairman Lyons reported briefly on an earlier meeting in 
Boston, with students and representatives of the Office of the 
Dean of Students present, to discuss a series of proposed changes in 
residence hall policies for the coming academic year. 

Dean Field stated that he had completed a study and was 
prepared to present an operational proposal for the residence hall 
program. A draft form of this document was distributed to the 
committee . 

Dean Field reported that, during the past year, interest 
had increased enormously among students in changing certain 
residence hall regulations. During this period, signouts had de- 
clined, closing hours of residence halls were getting increasingly 
complex. Finally, a committee with large student representation, 
was appointed to study this matter and it came in with proposals 
late this spring. These were taken under advisement by the Office 
of the Dean of Students. Finally, a report was prepared and this 
had been accepted in principle by Dean Field and President Lederle. 
The last academic year, however, came to a close without any 
operational proposal being adopted. In subsequent discussions with 
the administration, it appeared that certain revisions were de- 
sirable. The present draft represents a new version. 

Dean Field noted that the latest revised proposal 
recommends the following: 

a. That curfews be continued for freshman women. 

b. That all residence halls be locked at the time 

of the curfew for freshman women (12 midnight 
on week days and 1:00 a.m. on Friday and 
Saturday nights). 



2759 



Student 
Residence 
Hall Policies 



2760 



COMMITTEE 



e. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

That sign in and sign out procedures be 
made voluntary; but the University will 
operate this system, and no student is to 
be penalized if she does not choose to 
sign out. If a woman student plans to 
return after closing hours, she will be 
required to sign out, indicating only her 
anticipated time of return. She may also 
satisfy this requirement by phoning in. 

There will be no "parietal" hours. Open 
houses, once a month or so, will be per- 
mitted with counsellors present, pro- 
viding this is approved by vote of the 
entire residence hall. 

Calling hours by members of the opposite 
sex may be authorized in public areas of 
the residence halls, but only by vote of 
the residents, and, in any case, not ex- 
tending beyond the prescribed closing 
hours for all residence halls. 

Operation of kitchenettes in the residence 
halls will henceforth conform entirely to 
the regulations of the University with 
respect to environmental health and safety. 

There shall be no inspection of rooms, ex- 
cept in case of special circumstances re- 
lated to health or safety. 



Each residence hall will have 
elected government. 



a democratically 



Dean Field stated that students responsible for late night 
desk duty will be employed on work-study funds and be responsible 
to the Division of Security. Students on duty during earlier hours 
will include some volunteers. 

The telephone problem was discussed, and it was agreed 
that it is extremely difficult under present circumstances for a 
parent or anyone outside the campus to reach a particular student 
at any time of the day. Dean Field pointed out that the new tele- 
phone system installed in individual rooms in the Southwest Complex 
will go a long way toward alleviating this problem. 

Discussion turned to the question of security for the 
residence halls. At the present time, this security system is in 
the hands of night watchmen who have considerable territory to 
cover. As a result, there is reduced effectiveness. The Dean of 
Students now proposes that residence halls be grouped into six areas 
each area to have a security person assigned to it to check on fire 
and general safety conditions, as well as the illicit entrance of 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

intruders. Orchard Hill, for example, houses 1288 students and 
each of the residence halls has lounging areas, laundry room, wash- 
ing and dry rooms, kitchenettes, etc. — all of which should be 
inspected nightly, and one man would be kept busy going through 
these facilities on safety and security patrol. 

Dean Field pointed out that, next fall, the University 
will have the highest residence hall population in proportion to 
total enrollment in the northeast. In fact, a few major universi- 
ties in the United States house as many students percentagewise to 
total enrollment as the University of Massachusetts. 

Trustee Croce raised certain points with respect to the 
proposed change in curfew policy. He suggested the possibility 
of creating "curfew residences" and "non-curfew residences," pro- 
viding students an option whether they wished to dwell in one or 
the other; also that students electing the "curfew residence" 
might be assessed a fee to defray the cost of operating the program 
He also raised the possibility of lifting curfews on a graduated 
basis, with certain nights only designated as curfew free during 
the first year or two. 

President Lederle pointed out that students in a curfew- 
free residence hall are under no obligation to exercise the curfew 
privilege. It is impossible for the University to be completely 
"in loco parentis," the President said. 

"We are trying to get the student to mature and decide 
himself when he comes in. We will maintain records on the where- 
abouts of students through the use of sign-in and sign-out sheets. 
If a parent wants his child to observe curfew, the University will 
keep the record, but the student and the parent must agree between 
themselves whether they wish to utilize this service. Any viola- 
tion of this agreement as to time of return is a family matter, 
the University merely keeping the record." 

Dean Field pointed out that his office wished to keep the 
residence hall program under control and not create circumstances 
which might lead to losing more mature upper level students to 
apartments and private dwellings around the town — a situation whit' 
has occurred at other universities. He also pointed out that the 
new policy of locking men's residence halls at a specific closing 
hour would have a helpful effect on getting male students in 
earlier so that they could pursue their studies. 

The Trustees agreed that the report by Dean Field was 
simply for briefing and information purposes, and that no 
committee action was required. It was also pointed out that the 
changes in residence hall policy were experimental, and that 
alterations and adjustments could be made later on if this proved 
desirable or necessary. 

The Secretary was instructed to send to the full Board 
of Trustees copies of the documents which had been briefed by Dean 
Field in his comments. 



2761 



2762 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The three documents related to proposed changes in 
residence hall policies (67-006 and 67-007) are, therefore, attached 
to these minutes in order to provide background information for all 
Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



jOA4Mh-\ 




McCartney- 
Board of Trustee/! 



V 



V 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
August 2, 1966, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, UM/Amherst 



PRESENT: Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Croee, Emerson, 
Maginnis and Thompson; Provost Tippo, 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Planning Officer Littlefield; 

Messrs. Alexander and Galehouse 

of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, 

Director of Physical Plant Hugill. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the committee of discussion 
at the last meeting on three appraisals received for the Syrian 
Church property at the site of the Medical School in Worcester. 
The appraisals were nearly identical, within $3,000. The Syrian 
Church group originally paid $7,300 for the property, obtained 
from the Commonwealth, back in 1957 or 1958. The land is now 
assessed at $4-9,000, due to re-evaluation and rezoning. The church 
deed restricts use of the land to church and church related 
activities. If used for any other purpose, it would revert back 
to the Commonwealth at no cost. 

The Treasurer reported on a meeting between Syrian Church 
officials, Attorney Austin Broadhurst of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and 
Proctor, Inc. and himself. This was a preliminary conference and 
no agreement was reached on a fair price for the property. It was 
indicated that a second meeting would be held on August 5. The 
Treasurer will report on the outcome at a later date. 

There was brief discussion on proposed names for high 
and low-rise buildings in the Southwest Complex. Upon motion made 



and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the five high-rise buildings in the 
Southwest Residence Hall Complex be 
called the Presidential Towers, and that 
the separate buildings be named for four 
Presidents who went to the White House 
from Massachusetts, as follows: John 
Adams, John Quincy Adams, Calvin Coolidge 
and John F. Kennedy; the fifth high-rise 
residence hall to be named for George 
Washington. 

It was also 



/ 



2763 



Land 

Acquisition, 

Worcester 



Naming of 
New Buildings 



i 



COMMITTEE 



Progress 
Report 
UM/Boston 
Site 



Presentation 
by Repre- 
sentatives of 
Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay 
Associates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the four low-rise residence halls 
in the Southwest Complex be named after 
deceased distinguished faculty members 
as follows: Guy Chester Crampton, 
Walter E. Prince, Charles H. Patterson 
and Alexander A. Mackimmie. 

Trustee Brown recommended that, at an appropriate time in 
the future, the name of William Daniel Hurd, co-founder of the 
nationwide system of extension services, should be affixed to a 
building in the College of Agriculture. General Maginnis suggested 
that at some future time a building should be named after Professor 
Alexander E. Cance. 

At this point, the meeting was recessed to the President's 
Office in South College. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Chancellor Ryan re- 
ported that he had talked with various persons at the State House 
yesterday on H-3477 (UM/Boston Building Purchase Bill) ) which had 
come up the previous Wednesday for enactment and had failed because 
a bond issue included in the bill requires a two- thirds vote. The 
main problem, he said, was section 4 of the legislation which called 
for "in lieu of taxes" payment to the City of Boston. The 
Chancellor stated that Representative Bartley had been extremely 
helpful; also, that Representative Quinn had won three battles to 
get section 4- into the bill and keep it there. 

Chancellor Ryan stated that Mr. Richard Galehouse of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates would present a report on alternate 
sites to the proposed Highland Park location for UM/Boston. 

The major criteria are as follows: 

a. accessibility 

b. size 

c. appropriateness to University purposes 

d . bui Idabi li ty 

Treasurer Johnson observed that it is necessary at this 
time to consider alternatives to Highland Park, unless we wish to 
become involved with indefinite delay. At the same time, the 
Treasurer urged the committee to note that the Highland Park site 
has not been removed from consideration by BRA. 

Chancellor Ryan stated that Mr. Stainton, an assistant to 
Mr. Logue, had flatly recommended that the University not be named 
the principal developer of the Highland Park area on the grounds 
that there would be later pressure to expand, and no room for ex- 
pansion exists. He added, however, that Mr. Logue had informed him 
that BRA had not changed its mind about Highland Park as a possible 
site for UM/Boston. 



f 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Messrs. Galehouse and Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates next reviewed alternate sites and presented a report. 
The alternates included (a) Wollaston Golf Course, (b) Columbia 
Point (c) an idealized site on Route 128. 

Mr. Galehouse noted that only Highland Park should be 
designated as a definitely urban location. Columbia Point and the 
Wollaston Golf Course are semi-urban; the "idealized" Route 128 
site is definitely suburban. He added that Wollaston and Columbia 
Point are not as favorably located with respect to public trans- 
portation . 



I 



of the sites 



The following salient points were made concerning each 
,es: 



Highland Park 



Wollaston 
Golf Course 



Columbia 
Point 



Due to a change in plans of the Boston 
School Committee for the so-called "campus 
high school" in the Madison Park area, the 
available space in Highland Park may already 
have diminished to 130 acres. It is possible 
that a campus of 25,000 students could be 
condensed to 100 acres. The conclusion was 
that Highland Park represents the best 
available acreage of any of the possible 
sites. Chancellor Ryan indicated his hope 
that the Trustees would designate this 
location as the preferred location. 

Mr. Alexander indicated that the main area 
was in Milton along Granite Avenue. There 
are some semi-industrial surroundings. 
Reasonably good interchange access exists. 
The golf course has 90 acres and 10 addi- 
tional acres are available in other property. 
Soil conditions are excellent in the hill 
area, but some parts of the plot are low 
lying and marshy and actually worse than 
conditions at Columbia Point. Public trans- 
portation is poor. Estimated probable cost 
for acquiring the acreage at Wollaston 
(56 acres in Milton; 35 in Quincy) was 2 
or 2.5 million dollars. It was pointed out 
that no discussions have been held on this 
matter with land holders. 

Mr. Alexander stated that hydraulic fill 
would be required to provide sufficient 
land to erect a campus at Columbia Point. 
There is poor interchange access and a new 
entrance road would be required. All build- 
ings would need pilings; anything above four 
stories in height would have to be grounded 
on bed rock. The possibility was raised 
that the BRA. might pick up some of the cost 



2765 



Sasaki Slide 
Presentation 
and Report 



2766 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



on providing utilities. Chancellor Ryan 
noted that apparently the City of Boston 
has plans for installing a shopping center 
and amusement park directly across from 
the area under consideration for UM/Boston. 



i 



"Idealized" Messrs. Alexander and Galehouse showed 
Route 128 Site slides of a transposed campus layout on 
an "idealized" Route 128 site (which, 
actually, could be located in any one of 
several areas adjacent to the highway. 
The conclusion was that a location might 
be found near or adjacent to both the 
expressway and proposed future rapid 
transit lines. 

Chancellor Ryan stated that dialogue continues between 
Treasurer Johnson and himself and representatives of the BRA. 



After further brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Columbia Point area as a possible site for 
the UM/Boston campus be dropped from further 
consideration. 

Chancellor Ryan mentioned briefly the so-called "Governor 
Shirley Proposal" made by a group of individuals in Roxbury who 
have suggested approximately 100 acres for the UM/Boston campus. 
This area is not adjacent to Highland Park. 



i 



Right- of -Way 
Request 



Treasurer Johnson presented for the Committee's con- 
sideration a request by Attorney Sanford Keedy on behalf of a 
client for a right-of-way over University property to gain access 
to a parcel of land near the rifle range, said parcel having been 
sold to the client by Mr. Wysocki. 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they decline the request of Attorney 
Keedy on behalf of his client, to provide 
access over University property to a 
leased plot of land adjacent to the Wysocki 
farm on North East Street. 



Architects 
for New 
Projects 



Treasurer Johnson reported that there are two buildings 
on hand for which architects have not yet been selected: 

a. Addition to the Infirmary 

b. Life Sciences Building 



t 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer raised, the question of procedure in view 
of all the discussion with respect to appointment of architects. 
The President suggested that it would be wise to have additional 
interviews with Massachusetts architects at an early date,, and 
that Dean Belluschi might be requested to provide additional names 
for consideration. 

The Treasurer requested Director of Physical Plant 
Hugill to analyze the bids on the Central Storage Building. 

Mr. Hugill reported that the bids were good, but in- 
sufficient funds are on hand to proceed with construction; also, 
the Bureau of Building Construction wishes to have the University 
cut back on the plans. Mr. Hugill stated that the low prime bidder 
was Aquadro & Cerruti, Inc. at $1,370,689. There were two 
alternates as follows: 

a. Minus $24,000 (equipment) 

b. Minus $24,000 (materials shed) 

Mr. Hugill stated that the Bureau of Building Construe tio 
wished to take up both alternates. He noted that it would be 
possible to take up alternate #1, trim the estimates slightly, and 
proceed in a satisfactory manner. 

He displayed a sheet shOY/ing cost increases chargeable 
to lost time on this project while the plans were on file with the 
Bureau of Building Construction. The delays were as follows: 



Architects Delays 
Minus 5 mos. 12 das. 



U of M BBC Delays 

Plus 44 das. Minus 9 mos. 17 das. 



Mr. Hugill presented a further roster of projects now 
held up in. the Bureau of Building Construction. 



Delayed at BBC 

1. Preliminary plans to extend 
Athletic Fields 

2. Belchertown-Deerfield Project 

3. Machmer Hall 

4. Bartlett #1 



Additional Time to 
Complete Review 

2 , 5 months 



6 weeks 



4 to 6 weeks 



The President stated that this list creates real concern 
and might well be presented as soon as possible to the Governor, 
who has indicated an interest in being informed about these 
matters, prior to their coming to the attention of the press at 
open meetings of the Board of Trustees. He added further that the 
Governor should be informed of amounts of Federal Funds about to 
be lost in view of the delays. 



276? 



Bid on 
Central 
Storage 
Building 



2768 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee advised the Treasurer to recommend to the 
Bureau of Building Construction that the low prime bid of Aquadro & 
Cerruti, Inc. for construction of the Central Storage Building on 
the basis of alternate #1 (minus $24, 000) be accepted. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 



I 




Robert fz\ McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trusts 




t 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

August 11, 1966, 11:00 a.m., Hancock Room, Statler Hilton Hotel, 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Vice Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Emerson, Lyons, 
Pumphret and Troy; Provost Tippo, 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Professor William Havard, Head 
of the Department of Government. 

Vice Chairman Healey referred to the appearance at a 
prior meeting of the Executive Committee of Professor Matthew 
Zunic who had presented a petition informally with respect to his 
receiving merit salary increments. 

It was noted that the committee had given a careful hear- 
ing to Professor Zunic' s views, and had unanimously found no 
evidence of discrimination. It was pointed out that Professor 
Zunic had "been informed of the criteria for merit increases, such 
as progress on an advanced degree. 

President Lederle reported that the administration was 
presently putting together for Board consideration the operating 
budget request for 1968. New items under consideration include: 

a. Law School 

b. Funds for the activation of educational 

television Channel 57 

c. Continuing Education 

The President noted that subsidiary accounts must grow 
commensurate with the growth of the University. There is also 
need for an equipment "catch up." To compete with other universi- 
ties who already pay partial moving expenses for new recruits, the 
sum of $50,000 might be required in the 03 account. 

There followed brief discussion on the proper budget 
status of the control service. It was emphasized that, as long as 
the service remains within the University budget, it should be 
identified as a separate item and not confused in any way with 
funds required for the basic instructional program. 

Vice Chairman Healey reported on a broad philosophy which 
appears to be developing in the new Board of Higher Education. 
Stated briefly, this involves the concept that every member of the 
overall system does not have to "do everything" in every institu- 
tion. It seems assured that the BHE will favor more inter-insti- 
tutional cooperation between public institutions and between public 



Review of 

Recent 

Petition 



1968 

Operating 
Budget 
Request 



2770 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston 
Budget 
Request - 
1968 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and private institutions. It was indicated that the Board of 
Higher Education is seeking a chancellor, and that organizational 
activities could well consume most of the upcoming academic year. 

President Lederle stated that the 1968 budget emphasis 
would include the following: 

a. Funds exceeding the present $200,000 for 

University library books 

b. A "catch up" factor in salaries 

c. Increase in teaching assistants' stipends 

d. Additional funds for operation of the Summer 

School 

e. Continuing support for the establishment of 

a fluid research fund 

President Lederle asked Chancellor Ryan to comment on 
needs at UM/Boston. 

Chancellor Ryan commented that there would be no funds 
requested in the budget for a Summer School program, extension 
activities or for seeking a permanent UM/Boston campus site. 
Nevertheless, in order to insure a nroper quality level, he stated 
that total requests for UM/Boston would amount to a per capita 
dollar cost higher than usual heretofore in Massachusetts. 

The Chancellor indicated that this would be so for the 
following reasons: 

1. The possible establishment of an Institute for 

Public Service to aid State Government in 
in-service training of State employees 

2. Development of an urban studies program (services 

and research) 

3. Additional non- teaching staff positions 

4. Library purchase funds ($500,000 required in 

1968 in order to guarantee 80,000 volumes — 
100,000 volumes required for a basic four- 
year undergraduate library) 

5. Normal additional increment for increased en- 

rollment to offer a third year instructional 
program. 

The Chancellor observed that the University had 
originally intended that the overall enrollment should increase by 
1,000 each year. He now feels that we ought to revise this goal. 
We should admit 1,000 freshmen each year, but because of attrition, 
plan to increase only to the limit of 2,600 or 2,700 students for 
the third year. The Chancellor pointed out that, in order to obtain 



k- 



2771 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a straight line increase of 1,000 students per year overall, it 
y/ould be necessary to admit much more than 1,000 students to the 
freshman class. Secondly, there are space problems. Thirdly, 
flexibility is desired with reference to admissions. 

The President next turned to the question of the pro- 
posed Law School and activation of educational television Channel 
57. 

After brief discussion, it was agreed that a report on 
the Law School proposal should properly be deferred until the 
master plan discussions in September and October. It was agreed, 
for the time being, that the Law School would not be placed in the 
1968 request budget. 

Vice Chairman Healey requested Secretary McCartney to 
comment on the 1968 budget request for educational television, 
(assuming that the University is awarded the license to UHF 
Channel 57). 

The Secretary outlined briefly the requirements of the 
Federal Communications Commission with respect to application for 
an educational television license, including the need to show 
evidence of ability to finance construction and operation of a 
station in terms of at least minimum federal standards, once the 
construction permit is granted. 

It was indicated that the operating budget would run 
somewhere in the vicinity of $120,000 per year, and that con- 
struction costs (both studio and transmitting facilities, tower, 
micro-wave relay, etc.) would approximate one million dollars. 
Federal matching funds are available for part of this. 

It was agreed that this item must be included in the 1968 
operating and capital requests because the license for Channel 57 
will not remain open indefinitely. 

It was agreed, after some discussion, that the initial 
and primary operation of the station — as a first link in the pro- 
posed state-wide network of educational television stations — 
should be to relay existing educational and cultural enrichment 
programs of WGBH-TV (Channel 2), Boston, with a minimum amount of 
program origination from the University campus in Amherst at the 
outset. It was agreed that the budget would be adjusted and pre- 
sented in accordance with this goal, so that progress on the appli- 
cation for the channel license could proceed on schedule. 



The meeting was ad jourhed) at 12:25 p.m 




Rober1/\y. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



Lav/ School 
Discussion 
Deferred 



2772 



COMMITTEE 



Problems 
Related to 
Pending 
Legislation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT 
AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

August 19, 1966, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: Chairman Emerson, Provost Tippo; 
Trustees Maginnis and Troy; 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Redfern, 
Business Manager Grady and 
Planning Officer Littlefield. 



At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Redfern outlined 
key items of pending legislation which were of concern to the Uni- 
versity. These were as follows: 



a. Supplementary budget 

b. The Co- terminus bill (S. 976) 

c. UM/Boston building purchase bill (H, 

d. The salary relief bill (H. 32-4) 

e. The Capital Outlay Bill (H. 3980) 



3477) 



Chancellor Ryan indicated that the addition of the 
library staff requests to UM/Boston v/as vitally important. 

Dean Redfern said that there is a possibility that the 
House might cut the Governor's supplementary request. The Provost 
nnted that a restoration in library funds of $250,000 is badly 
needed. The University has been cut $500,000 in its 01 account. 
Individuals are already hired on the expectancy of these funds 
being appropriated. It was pointed out that the Governor's 
recommendation of $440,000, if approved, would go a long way toward 
alleviating this problem. 

The Provost stated that the University appears to be 
getting less money in seven different accounts this year, while, at 
the same time, adding 1,300 more students. 

After further discussion, it was agreed that the Univer- 
sity should try to sustain the Governor's supplemental budget re- 
quest in toto, plus $50,000 for library acquisitions at UMass/Boston 
and $200,000 for library acquisitions at UM/Amherst. 

In response to a query from Chairmar Emerson, it was de- 
termined that the telegram from the Board of Trustees to the legis- 
lative leadership opposing certain amendments to the co-terminus 
bill had been sent by Chairman Boyden. It was indicated that House 
3477 — the UM/Boston Building Purchase Bill — was currently in 
the Senate, and that it might pass minus the "lieu of tax payment" 
proviso. 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



I 



li 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Salary Relief Bill — (H. 324) — is now with the 
Senate Ways and Means Committee. It was agreed that the position 
of the Board of Trustees should he that the absolute minimum re- 
quirement on this bill is its passage on the basis of 2% of the 
staff, and minus any salary ceiling limit. 

The Capital Outlay program — (H. 3980) ~ went through 
the House for three readings and to the Senate with more than 
$4,000,000 added to the budget for State Colleges, while $2,000,00C 
was cut from the University. 

A"ter brief discussion, it was agreed that everything 
possible should be done to retain or restore the following items: 

1. $400,000 for the Fine Arts Teaching Center plans 

2. Land acquisition funds 

3. The Health Service addition 

4. Roads, walks and parking 

5. The Life Science plans 

Planning Officer Littlefield commented that the land 
acquisitions priority, within the appropriation, would be for 
acquisition of the Winkler property at the north end of the campus. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 





Secret 



rt J. McCartney 
Board of Trustaa 



2773 



The Salary 
Relief Bill 

(H. 324) 



2774 



COMMITTEE 



Department 
Status - 
Industrial 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES' OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

September 1, 1966, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustee Haigis; Provost Tippo, 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Assistant to the Provost Venman, 
Deans Hunsberger, Moore and Picha, 
Professors Fox, Paulsen, Sevoian, 
Shapiro, Reid, Trueswell and 
We s the ad. 



Chairman Troy called the meeting together at 11:00 a.m. 

Dean Picha of the School of Engineering and Professor 
Trueswell, Chairman of Industrial Engineering, were invited to 
present information in support of a proposal to grant Industrial 
Engineering departmental status. 

Dean Picha stated that six persons, five of them with 
Ph.D.s were now in Industrial Engineering instruction. The depart- 
ment is oriented toward Mathematics, and has been a department in 
all but name. 

Professor Trueswell stated that the scope of Ph.D. work 
in Industrial Engineering is related to operations analysis and re- 
search, including time study, etc . ; but more and more the work has 
been moving in the direction of mathematics and models. Operations 
research is emphasized. 

Dean Picha noted that he was against proliferation 
basically, but was pleased to accept Industrial Engineering because 
it has become a "completely different stem. " 

It was pointed out that there are presently 50 under- 
graduate majors, and the number is increasing steadily. Twelve 
master's degrees have been awarded. Since he is newly appointed, 
Dean Picha was invited by the Provost to comment on the Engineering 
School in general. Dean Picha responded that there was a good, 
strong undergraduate teaching program. He hoped to infuse more re- 
search orientation. He is trying to obtain development grants from 
industry, government and foundations. This will increase the 
s tat 'ore of the School and will attract better undergraduate students 
Additional funds will be required in order to attract additional 
graduate students. He expects that there will be a first-rate 
graduate program in the School of Engineering in approximately five 
years, providing there is increased support. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Picha was invited to comment on the work of Dr. 
Howard Segool. The Dean responded that Dr. Segool heads the state 
technical services act program placed here by the Governor. Within 
four years, this program will he expending $4,000,000 annually. 
The funds will provide liaison persons to seek out small business 
problems in the Commonwealth, relaying these back to the University 
in order to have our analysts come up with solutions. Dean Picha 
looks forward to some form of closed circuit television communica- 
tion within industrial plants and received at the University to 
assist in this program. 

Dean Picha noted that the enrollment in '67-68 would 
approximate the same enrollment as this year, roughly 1,000 stu- 
dents. Graduate students will probably reach 150 (up 25). 

The Dean concluded that the University is gaining a 
national reputation as a growing institution that is on the march, 
One problem is that of obtaining moving expenses for new faculty 
recruited. Many universities provide $500 for Assistant Pro- 
fessors; $750 for Associates, and $1,000 for full Professors, he 
noted . 

Chairman Troy stated that some Trustees had raised 
questions about this proposal. He feels that the committee needs 
more information on the nature of the program. Professor Thomas 
Fox, Head of the Department of Veterinary and Animal Science and 
Professor Martin Sevoian, Professor, Research, of Veterinary and 
Animal Science, were invited to comment. 

Professor Fox stated that the Department of Veterinary 
and Animal Science has an extensive poultry diagnostic service. 
Much material comes to the University for histopathology and furthe}? 
study. A considerable amount of research is also carried out in 
these areas. This establishes an excellent background for a 
graduate program. 

Five students are presently interested in taking graduate 
work. There are increasing opportunities for students to go into 
research, and into pharmaceutical firms, etc. 

Dr. Fox indicated also that a large grant is expected to 
come soon from the Agricultural Research Service for work in 
Salmonella. Dr. Sevoian has been awarded a grant for research in 
avian leukosis in the amount of $20,000 annually. 

A question was raised as to why training could not be 
given exclusively in the biological sciences. Dr. Fox responded 
that more specific experience could "he provided in the area of 
animal research. The Biology Department is emphasizing Microbiology 
He continued that the plan envisions granting a 10-credit block 
for the Master's thesis; the additional 20 credits would be provide 
in microbiology, immunization, etc. 



277 f 



M.S . in 

Veterinary 

Hygiene 



4 >-^>yr* 
d>4 4KJ 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Moore commented that there is an important 
difference between basic science and the proposed Master's degree 
program, in that the latter is pathologically oriented. Dr. Fox 
added that part of this program would be a service to other 
disciplines. 

As discussion proceeded, it was brought out that two 
members of the department are presently on the Control budget, one 
on Extension, and the rest with the Experiment Station. There 
would be no difficulty in drawing a "thesis staff" from the exist- 
ing staff. 

It was estimated, that within five years, not as many 
students would be enrolled in this option as in Genetics. Five 
years hence, possibly ten to twelve students would be involved. 

It was brought out that one member of the department, 
Dr. Smith, now teaches animal diseases at the undergraduate level, 
a service program for public health; he also teaches the same topic 
to students in the Stockbridge School. 

Dr. Sevoian commented that, under the present proposal, 
students would study the dynamics of animal diseases. Other de- 
partments Yrould be utilized, including Microbiology and Zoology. 
But the program basically would take the pathogen into the host and 
study the effects on the host. 

Dr. Fox noted that Dr. Russell Smith, who evolved the 
proposal, is interested in leptospirosis, and is studying the effect 
of this in sheep abortions. He is working with the Microbiology 
Department on this. 

It was pointed out that the National Institutes of Health 
may be expected to subsidize part of the work, and that no initial- 
increase in cost would be envisioned for the program. At the presenjt 
the department is offering degrees in genetics and physiology. 

Dean Moore brought out a comparison between the proposed 
program and the desire of a clinical medical doctor who wishes to 
go into research. The same situation holds true with certain 
doctors of veterinary medicine. Dr. Fox emphasized, however, that 
this was not intended to compete with the DVM degree. He also 
stressed that there was no present plan to establish a Ph.D. degree 
in Veterinary Hygiene. Resources are simply not available. He 
added that the M.S. degree, if approved, would serve a person who 
wished to go on for a doctoral degree elsewhere in Animal Science. 

It was brought out that the existing Master's degree in 
Animal Science is weighted toward biology and statistics. 

At this point, the committee adjourned to the Student 
Union for lunch. The meeting was resumed in the Dukes Room of the 
Student Union after lunch. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Hunsberger commented that there has been a de facto 
separation between the Department of German and the Department of 
Russian for some time. This should now be made official. The new 
separate department should be called respectively, the Department 
of Germanic Languages and Literature; the Department of Slavic 
Languages and Literature. 

Dr. Paulsen stated that there had been a tendency to 
centralize such departments immediately after World War II. Re- 
cently, there has been a trend in the opposite direction, because 
sufficient economies were not realized in the original trend. The 
main reason, however, is that so much growth has been experienced 
at both levels lately that it becomes unwieldly at the graduate 
level to administer the program as a combined department. 

It was stated that future growth of the Department of 
Germanic Languages and Literature envisions the addition of pro- 
grams in Scandinavian studies and possibly Dutch. It is intended 
to obtain National Defense Scholarships to assist with this de- 
velopment. Professor Posin commented that this is a "coming of 
age." Future programs in the Department of Slavic Languages and 
Literature may well include Polish, and other Slavic languages. 

He favored the strengthening of linquistics at the Uni- 
versity, on the basis that this is a broader approach than con- 
centration on language study only. 

Future projects may well include: 

1. The establishment of a Translation Workshop (for 
the training of translators — foundation grants 
involved) 

2. Establishment of an overseas branch staffed by 
our faculty in the field of Russian or Polish 
linguistics, possibly in Leningrad or Moscow. 

Dean Hunsberger reported that the proposal to separate 
Bio-chemistry from Chemistry had been in discussion for approxi- 
mate ly three years. Dr. Westhead commented that his associates see 
the Bio-chemistry discipline resting between Chemistry and Biology. 
The chemist sees molecules; the biologist is interested in life. 
The bio-chemist has the chemist's interest in molecular, but is 
also interested in life and what affects it. In recent years, he 
noted, the biological sciences have found their own answers down 
at the molecular level. Common ground between the bio-chemist and 
the chemist has developed much more slowly. Biological sciences 
are now the bio-chemists' horizons. Bio-chemistry exists as a 
discipline in itself. He noted that the enrollment in advanced 
Bio-chemistry has doubled this year. 

Dr. Shapiro, Head of the Department of Botany, distribute^ 
a memorandum to the committee containing extracts from a recent 
study of the National Academy of Sciences, and quoting appropriate 



277? 



Proposal to 
Divide the 
Present De- 
partment of 
German - 
Russian into: 
Department of 
Germanic 
Languages & 
Literature 

Department of 
Slavic 
Languages & 
Literature 



New Department 
of Bio- 
chemistry 



2778 



COMMITTEE 



Major Appoint- 
ment in De- 
partment of 
Speech 



cbli shine nt 
of Department 
of Physic:: 
Astronomy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

sections of an article entitled "The Plant Sciences, Now and in the 
Coming Decade . " 

An appropriate quotation: Trends in Plant Science in the 
United States . 

"Any planning for research designed to improve our present 
plant science must take into account two major shifts, (l) the rise 
of bio-chemistry, and (2) the shift of interest within agricultural 
science . " 

After the Trustees had had an opportunity to review the memo, 
Dr. Shapiro indicated thai: he supported strongly the proposed 
establishment of a separate Department of Bio-chemistry. It was 
brought out further that Bio-chemistry departments are practically 
universal now in major universities. 

Professor Reid, Chairman of the Department of Speech, was 
invited to comment on an opportunity to engage a senior faculty 
member for the Speech Department. He outlined the curriculum vitae 
of the individual under consideration, and stated that he was in- 
terested in graduate rhetoric work. Dr. Reid placed this individual 
in the top thirty faculty members in this field in the nation. 

It was emphasized by the Provost that such an appointment 
might well lead to the establishment of further graduate work in 
the department, leading eventually to the development of a Ph.D. 
program. 

Dean Hunsberger reported that an extensive study con- 
ducted by Professor Gluckstern, Head of the Department of Physics, 
among leading department heads of Fnysics in the nation elicited 
the recommendation that our Department of Physics move in the 
direction of Astrophysics and Radio Astronomy, rather than along the 
traditional line of celestial mechanics. 

Professor Gluckstern has been able to attract Professor 
Irvine from Harvard University to head our astronomy program. It 
was indicated that the Four College Presidents would accept Pro- 
fessor Irvine as Chairman of the Four College Astronomy program. 

With the addition of Professor Irvine, three faculty 
members would be involved in Astrophysics: Irvine, Harrison and 
Arny. 

Dean Moore commented that Astronomy will become much more 
important in the next decade, due to the national space effort. 
It was also mentioned that no major addition of expensive equipment 
would be required to implement this program. The practice of the 
department is to utilize existing large equipment at centers such 
as Brookhaven Laboratory. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Hunsberger presented a report on the evaluations of 
the Department of Psychology rendered by a visiting team of 
distinguished psychologists, including Professor Richard Solomon 
of the University of Pennsylvania; Dr. Kenneth Clark, Dean of Arts 
and Sciences, University of Rochester; Dr. Carl Pfaffman, Vice 
President of Rockefeller University; and Dr. Stuart Cook of the 
University of Colorado. It was noted that the Psychology Depart- 
ment had recommended three of these individuals. 

Conclusions of the group: 

1. Tribute was paid to Professor Claude Neet, Head 

of the Department of Psychology, for his fine vrork 
in building a good department here despite the 
frequent shortage of support funds. 

2. A good general experimental learning group, headed 
by Professor Myers. 

3. A good clinical group, headed by Professor Epstein. 

4-. Graduate School students are highly selective and 
well trained. 

5. In general, we have a good faculty. 

The general conclusion: Of 100 degree-granting depart- 
ments at the Ph.D. level, we are in the top 50% nationally; better 
than Maryland and Syracuse; not as good as Connecticut or 
Pennsylvania State . 

More laboratory courses are needed and more equipment 
funds. It was suggested that plumbing be installed to offices in 
the new building scheduled for use by the Department of Psychology, 
so that these facilities might be used at a later time for re- 
search. 

A salary of $20,000 to $25,000 would be required to en- 
list a new department head. The present salary ceiling is a 
handicap. The new department head (Professor Neet has indicated 
his desire to step down as department chairman in 1967) should be 
provided with sufficient administrative assistance so that he can 
keep up with his research. There should be an assurance of our 
ability to appoint senior faculty members to handle sub-sections. 

Trustee Troy asked whether the evaluation team had 
looked into the question of how the department does its teaching. 
Dean Hunsberger commented that every Psychology course offered 
should have a laboratory component. 

After further brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 



2779 



Report on 

Visit of 

Psychology 

Department 

Evaluation 

Team 



2780 



Dept . of 
Germanic Lang. 
& Lit & Dept. 
of Slavic Lang 
& Lit . 

COMMITTEE 



Department of 
Bio-chemistry 



Department of 
Physics & 

Astronomy 



Program in- 
Industrial 
Engineering 



M.S. Degree 
in Veterinary 
Hygiene 



Major 

Appointment 
in Speech 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Department of German-Russian 
be divided into a Department of Germanic 
Languages and Literature and a Depart- 
ment of Slavic Languages & Literature. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that there he established a Department of 
Bio-chemistry. 

It was further ' 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Department of Physics be re- 
named the Department of Physics and 
Astronomy. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Program in Industrial Engineer- 
ing be granted departmental status. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that an M.S. degree program in Veterinary 
Hygiene be established in the Department 
of Veterinary and Animal Science. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the appointment of a 
senior faculty member as full professor 
in the Department of Speech. 



The meeting was adjournedat 2:50 p.m. 



' 



' 




Robert /0.' McCartney 
Secretary, /Board of Trustees 



f 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AMD EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

September 7, 1966, 12 Noon, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Solomon; Provost 
Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Secretary 
McCartney. 

Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 12 Noon. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To go into Executive Session for the 
purpose of discussing an important 
personnel matter. 

After due discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To come out of Executive Session for 
the purpose of adjournment. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:50 p.m. 





Rober/fc/J. McCartney 
Secretary, i Board of Trustee 




2782 



COMMITTEE 



Youth De- 
tention Board 
otiations 

Authorized 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
September 8, 1966, 2:00 p.m., Conference Room, UM/Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis and Frechette; Provost 
Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Haigis. 



Dean Soutter of the University Medical 
School; Planning Officer Littlefield; 
Messrs. Aldrich and Sterling of 
Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty, Inc.; 
Mr. Mello of Ritchie Associates; 
Mr. Ramseth of Ellerbe Inc.; 
Mr. Gedman of the Bureau of Building 
Construction; Mr. Galehouse of 
Sasaki, Dawson & DeMay, Inc. 



The meeting was called to order at 2:00 p.m. by Chairman 



After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize Dean Lamar Soutter of the 
University Medical School to enter negotia- 
tions with the Youth Detention Board of 
Worcester, Massachusetts, with a view to 
securing as much southern frontage as possible 
on Route 9 at the Medical School in Worcester 
for the purpose of planning a southern access 
road to the site. 

Dean Soutter observed that the soundings at the Worcester 
site apparently were not being taken at a close enough distance 
(200 feet) and that they should be taken henceforth at intervals of 
20 feet. 

He noted that certain difficulties for the architects had 
been created in planning the hospital and medical school. It was 
decided that the two buildings (hospital end medical science build- 
ing) should be attached floor by floor; also that the library should 
be attached, and lecture halls and laboratories stacked floor by 
floor. These parameters confine somewhat the work of the exterior 
architects. It is now apparent, however, that a handsome, 
functional design is moving forward. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



i 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There followed a presentation of preliminary sketches by 
architect Nelson Aldrich. His plans showed the basic location of 
the buildings on the site, together with optional delineation of 
how the hospital might expand horizontally, rather than vertically. 
There is also sufficient flexibility so that the facilities may be 
expanded to include double the number of students (800), and a 
hospital of 800 beds. The basic plan calls for a 4-00 bed hospital. 
Blocked out were areas for several additional ancillary health 
facilities, for recreation, parking and housing. Mr. Aldrich ex- 
pressed strong feeling that the parking situation is best handled 
by incorporating it into the design in such a manner that motor 
vehicles are hidden. The preliminary sketch displayed a parking 
garage wrapped around the hospital unit. An auditorium is 
projected for the garage roof. 

The fundamental concept calls for clinical and basic 
science units distributed on each floor. Colored photographs of 
models were shown illustrating various treatments which might be 
superimposed upon the basic functional layout. 

Mr. Mello of Ritchie Associates next displayed plan 13B 
(up to date as of last week) offering a preliminary idea of how the 
hospital might appear. He stated that the latest revisions were 
still in process of being projected as sketches. 

In general, the hospital will consist of five floors 
plus two service floors. There will be 70 patient rooms plus in- 
tensive care units with a capacity of 20 on each floor. The allo- 
cation of these would vary somewhat depending on other uses of the 
floor . 

President Lederle raised the question of allowing an 
appropriate amount of square footage for cafeteria service for the 
hospital staff in addition to space provided for the feeding of 
students . 

Mr. Aldrich expressed the general philosophy that there 
should be a single, main kitchen only for hospital staff and 
patients. A sub-kitchen would be provided for students, and there 
is presently a question whether catering service would be employed 
to assist in serving students. 

Dean Soutter stated that the main hospital kitchen is 
planned to be large enough with ample flexibility built in. He 
feels strongly that the students should have a separate feeding 
line. The faculty should eat in a separate room. There should, 
however, be a common source of preparation of food. The kitchen 
should be in a main unit on a lower floor. 

Dean Soutter concluded that he is satisfied with the 
amount of coordination he will be able to get in the completed 
buildings, based on the preliminary sketches outlined. He stated 
also that additional outside consultants had been brought in to 
verify the sketches. On a functional basis, the proposed plan 



2783 



Medical 
Science 
Building 
Projections 



Hospital 
Projections 



2784 



COMMITTEE 



Recommendation 
of Mr. 
Hamilton as 
Hospital 
Consultant 



Approval of 
Preliminary- 
Sketches: Uni- 
versity Hospital 
& University 
Medical Science 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

resembles somewhat the installations at the Universities of 
Kentucky and West Virginia. The Dean continued that the garage 
will probably cost out at approximately $2,000,000. Various 
methods of amortizing this over time may evolve. Everyone con- 
sulted thinks that the garage is a good idea and a necessary adjunct 
It is possible that some NIH funds will be available for this. 
Another option would be to fund the garage as a University Building 
Authority project. 

Mr. Aldrich commented that no decision has been made to 
date with respect to exterior materials. He wishes to get estimates 
first, and determine exactly what uses are planned for the various 
areas. At the outset, he" was thinking of masonry. 

Treasurer Johnson stressed that, before any final choice 
of exterior material is determined, the Board of Trustees should 
have the opportunity to render an approval. Additionally, it is 
important for the University to know immediately what method of 
heating is intended for the buildings. 

Dean Soutter stated that the NIH will not approve any plan 
on heating and utilities which will not permit future expansion; 
also, that NIH has had some unfortunate results in other projects 
utilizing electricity for heat. 

Dean Soutter mentioned that it is important at this' time 
to conclude a contract with Mr. Hamilton as hospital consultant. 
A former director of the University Hospital at the University of 
Minnesota, Mr. Hamilton, has already been extremely effective in 
solving certain problems of design, staffing and equipment. He has 
agreed to work with the University until the hospital opens. 
Hospital Director Stockwell is pleased at the prospect of having 
him. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
appointment of Mr. James Hamilton as 
Hospital Consultant to the University of 
Massachusetts on the basis of a five-year 
contract at an annual salary of $10,000, 
with the stipulation that Mr. Hamilton 
will guarantee 50 days of consultant ser- 
vice per annum. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they confirm and approve the preliminary 
sketches for the University Hospital and 
for the University Medical Science Building 
as submitted by Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty, Inc.; 
Ellerbe, Inc.; and Ritchie Associates. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson outlined in detail a proposal sub- 
mitted by Miss Ruth Mclntire, involving a gift and exchange of 
land adjacent to University property north of Pokeberry Ridge and 
west of East Pleasant Street, below Butterfield House. Miss 
Mclntire desires to have her gift of land accepted on the terms 
that the area would be left in natural woodland and maintained by 
the University as a sanctuary for nature conservancy. The Univer- 
sity would also be required to provide adequate policing to keep 
the sanctuary free of trash and litter. 

In exchange (although not a condition of the gift) the 
University might be disposed to transfer to Miss Mclntire a small 
plot of land northwest of Pokeberry Ridge and adjacent to a lot on 
which Miss Mclntire plans to build a house. This would guarantee 
and assure her right-of-way. The Treasurer noted that the Univer- 
sity landscape architect recommends that we accept this proposal. 

President Lederle commented that acceptance could place 
a restriction on our flexibility, in the event that we wished to 
place a dormitory in that location at some future date . 

After further discussion, it was agreed to authorize 
Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson to conduct further discussions with 
Miss Mclntire on a flexible basis concerning this matter. 

Treasurer Johnson outlined for the Trustees the location 
of the proposed new Fraternity-Sorority Park on the Richard Nelson 
property just south of the University's Tillson Farm. He indi- 
cated that the corporation is now at the site development stage, 
is worried about utilities outlets (water and sewer), and how to 
bring these lines off the plot to connect with town and/or Univer- 
sity existing lines. They have petitioned the University for a 
tie-in with the University sewer system near Eastman Lane so that 
a gravity flow can be obtained, thus eliminating the necessity of 
building a pumping station. 

It was pointed out that the proposed University College 
and the new Graduate Research Center will also tie into this 8-inch 
line. Director of Physical Plant Hugill recommends against favor- 
the petition. 

After further discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they decline to act favorably on a petition 
of the Fraternity-Sorority Park, Inc. to 
grant sewer rights in University linen 
adjacent to Eastman Lane. 

The Treasurer next outlined a proposal by the Fraternity- 
Sorority Park, Inc. to bring water over from University lines n r\ 
the Tillson Farm; also to bring a road across University property. 



278;* 



Proposed 
Gift & 
Exchange of 
Land 



Utility 
Connections 
Fraternity- 
Sorority Park 



2780 



COMMITTEE 



Disposal 
of the 
Homestead 



Capital 

Outlay 

Appropriation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer recommended against the road, but favored an easement 
with respect to the water line. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they provide an easement over University 
property for the construction of a water 
line connecting the proposed Fraternity- 
Sorority Park area with existing water 
line facilities on the University's Tillson 
Farm, in accordance with a petition pre- 
sented by the Fraternity-Sorority Park, Inc. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the Trustees that they had 
once voted to retain the Homestead as an historical building; also 
to relocate it to another section of the campus if required. It 
is now necessary to relocate the building in order to make room for 
the Graduate Research Center. The cost of relocation will approxi- 
mate $27,000. The building was appraised recently at $37,000. 
After some administrative deliberation on whether or not further 
funds should be expended to relocate the building, it is now con- 
cluded that it would be best to preserve it. 



Possible locations: a, 



b. 



Adjacent to the Stockbridge House 
as an ancillary facility for the 
Faculty Club 

On Route 116, when this is closed 
off 

As a residence for the Provost or 
a master's house for faculty members 
of the proposed University College 



The Treasurer stated that Sasaki, Dawson & DeMay, Inc. 
believed that it would fit in very nicely next to the Stockbridge 
House . 

After further discussion, it was agreed without vote that 
the building should be relocated rather than abandoned. Further 
consultation will also take place with representatives of Sasaki, 
Dawson & DeMay, Inc. 

Treasurer Johnson advised the Trustees that forms are 
presently on hand and are being readied for the Bureau of Building 
Construction for the next capital outlay appropriation request. 
Although a final determination on priorities may be deferred until 
the Trustees have had an opportunity to review the new Master Plan 
proposal, the Treasurer is seeking authority to place in priority 
those items which were deleted from the current year's capital out- 
lay request as follows: 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1 . Library 

2. Fine Arts Teaching Center plans 

3. Infirmary plans 

4. Life Science Building plans 

The remainder of the priority list would then follow 
down exactly as it was listed on the request from the previous year 

The Treasurer also reminded the Trustees that sums must 
he made available in this request budget for design of the Medical 
Science Building; also for design of buildings at UM/Boston. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that the faculty space shortage 
at UM/Boston this year is critical. No renovations are possible. 
The faculty could go into unrenovated space temporarily, but there 
will be immediate pressure for relocation of this group as soon as 
renovations are undertaken. 

A negative report has been received from architects with 
respect to the feasibility of adding additional space at the Sawyer 
building (Old Liberty Mutual Building). 

Two floors of the Liberty Mutual building addition 
(owned by Prudential Insurance Company and adjacent to the bus 
station in Park Square) are available. Each floor has forty or 
fifty offices. The building is air conditioned. It could be made 
available on a rental basis for $5.50 per square foot including 
maintenance, heat and electricity. Approximately $100,000 remains 
in the UM/Boston rental fund after taking into account that 
$70,000 is presently encumbered. The Treasurer requested approval 
for going immediately out to bid for this space through the State 
Superintendent of Buildings. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to move ahead immediately in con- 
junction with the State Superintendent of 
Buildings, to procure bids for the rental 
of sufficient office space to accommodate 
new faculty members at the University of 
Massachusetts/Boston. 



The meeting was adjourned^at 4:15 p.m 




Robert 
Secretary, 



278: 



•*? 



Other 
Business 



278R 



COMMITTEE 



Dean of 

Faculties 

UM/Boston 



Proposed 

UM/Boston 

Constitution 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

October 5, 1966, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Lyons, 
Plimpton, Rowland, McNamara; 
Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Assistant to the Provost Venman, 
Dean Spielman, Assistant to the 
Dean Allan, Dr. McKenzie, Dr. Fox, 
Professor Kuzmeski. 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 11:00 a.m. 

Chancellor Ryan of the University of Massachusetts/Boston 
was invited to present information relating to the inherent need 
for a Dean of Faculties. He requested approval to appoint Pro- 
fessor Gagnon, a UM/B staff member to the post, as acting dean, 
while a national search is conducted for a permanent appointee. 

It was thereupon moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the position of Dean of Faculties at the 
University of Massachusetts/Boston be 
created, and that a nationwide search be 
made to secure a suitable person for that 
position. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that Professor Paul Gagnon be appointed 
Acting Dean of Faculties at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts/Boston. 

Chancellor Ryan then presented to the committee a re- 
draft of the proposed University of Massachusetts/Boston Senate 
Constitution. 

Discussion ensued. Members of the committee were given 
an opportunity to go over the proposed constitution and to suggest 
changes. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle commented that certain articles re- 
quired further consideration. He suggested that Chancellor Ryan 
transmit these views to the Boston faculty, preparatory to sub- 
mitting a revised draft to this committee. The Chancellor was 
urged to convey the feeling of the committee that it is grateful 
for their earnest endeavors in preparing the document. He agreed 
to do so. 

Chancellor Ryan made strong recommendations that the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Boston faculty have opportunity to meet 
with this committee of the Trustees at an early date (hopefully 
before the October 22 meeting of the full board) to develop an ex- 
change of views on the following: 

1. Library problem 

2. Additional physical facilities - space required 

3. Research support for faculty 

4. Other items 

Provost Tippo introduced into the meeting discussion re- 
lating to the University's proposed library expansion and 
accelerated acquisition program. He brought out the fact that ex- 
pansion toward a library exceeding a million volumes and the con- 
struction of a 28-story library facility would require the position 
of Director of Libraries for purposes of coordination. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they establish the position of Director of 
University Libraries with the following 
duties: 

Serve as the chief administrative officer 
of the library system of the campus at 
Amherst: make recommendations to the 
Provost on appointment, reappointment, 
promotion, termination, tenure of library 
staff members; plan and direct the ser- 
vices and activities of the several 
libraries and their staffs; report to the 
Provost of the University. 

The University Librarian's duties are re- 
defined as follows: 

Perform such professional library duties 
as may be assigned by the Director of 
University Libraries. 

It was also 



2789 



Director of 
Libraries 



2790 



COMMITTEE 



Major 

Appointment 
in Botany 



Proposed 

Major 

Appointment 
in Physics 



Proposed 
Summer 
Program 
in Spain 



Tuition 
Arrangement 
Faculty 
Children 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they appoint Professor David Clay 
acting Director of Libraries, pending 
a national search for a director. 

Provost Tippo described the qualifications of a person 

proposed for a major appointment in Botany including membership in 

the National Academy of Sciences and a Professorship at Rockefeller 
University. 

In accordance with the Provost's recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that Professor Armin C. Braun be appointed 
as Professor of Botany at a salary of 
$27,000.00 

Provost Tippo next discussed a proposed major appointment 
in Physics, stating that Professor Gluckstern would like to 
recommend an outstanding faculty member for the post. This would 
require a salary of $35,000. It was brought out that this indi- 
vidual has annual grants on the order of $250,000 which would off- 
set the cost to the University. General discussion of national 
averages for salaries for such personnel was held and it was decided 
to delay action on this matter and to take it up with the Executive 
Committee at its next meeting. 

At this point Assistant to the Provost Venman entered the 
meeting. Copies of a proposal for a University sponsored Summer 
Program in Madrid were passed out to the members of the committee. 
Dr. Venman gave an enthusiastic report summarizing last summer's 
program in Bologna and Oxford. It is proposed to organize a 
similar group for summer study in Spain, as indicated in the 
attached material. Dr. Venman stated that Professor Bleiberg of 
the University faculty will accompany the group. After discussion 
of costs and plans in general, the recommendation was made that 
this plan be adopted and it was therewith 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the plan for a Summer Program in 
Madrid, Spain, be adopted as detailed 
in document 67-014, which document is 
attached hereto and will be sent to 
members of the Board of Trustees. 

President Lederle brought to the attention of the meeting 
the extension of tuition arrangement for faculty children of New 
England State Universities. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that for a period of three years be- 
ginning with the academic year 1967-68 
the University of Massachusetts will 
treat as in-state students the children 
of faculty members of those New England 
State Universities that afford reciprocal 
arrangements . 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle submitted to the meeting a memorandum 
outlining the subject of five college cooperation and establish- 
ment of a center for cooperative development in education. 

The principle of the foregoing was endorsed by the meet- 
ing and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
adoption of the principle of a Center 
for Cooperative Development in Educa- 
tion as outlined in Document 67-010, 
which document is attached hereto and 
will be sent to the Board of Trustees. 

Treasurer Johnson addressed the meeting, summarizing the 
changes brought about by Legislative action as it affected salary 
schedules for the University, including steps necessary to process 
the 6% salary increases granted all full-time personnel effective 
December, 1966. 

Treasurer Johnson went into the mechanics of the program, 
including the reason for taking advantage at this time to put 
through some long needed improvements, including the rounding off 
of annual salaries in units of 100 dollars. 

Treasurer Johnson recommended that the Board (l) adopt a 
salary schedule for professional staff which will be in $100 
increment categories with corresponding weekly rates; (2) reclassi- 
fy existing salary ranges; (3) vote to apply the 6% increase to 
existing salaries. 

The Treasurer explained in some detail the financial 
responsibility of the University and manner -of handling, in the 
case of persons working under grants. He further remarked on the 
5% merit provision, appropriation for which has been made by the 
Legislature. 

Thereupon, motions having been made and seconded, it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that > 

VOTED : In conformity with the provisions of section 

14 of chapter seventy-five of the General Laws, 
as amended, and the provisions of chapter 635 
of the Acts of nineteen hundred sixty-six and 
the authority contained therein and all other 
acts applicable thereto, each person in the 
professional staff in a classified position 
paid in whole or in part from state funds under 
subsidiary accounts designated 01 and 02 on 
November twenty-seven nineteen hundred sixty- 
six shall receive an increase in his respective 
weekly salary rate equal to six percent; pro- 
vided, that no rate shall exceed the maximum 
rate in the general schedule in said chapter 
635 and that the provisions of chapter 635 of 



2791 



Center for 
Cooperative 
Development 
in Education 



Salary 

Schedule 
Changes 



2792 



COMMITTEE 



Actions on 
Salary- 
Schedules 



New 

Position 

Titles 



Discussion 
on Control 
Services 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the Acts of nineteen hundred sixty-six 
shall he applied in like manner to all 
professional staff paid from other than 
state funds provided however that in the 
case of those paid from institute, grant, 
or contract funds such payment shall be 
subject to the recommendation of the 
principal investigator or director of 
the project and his certification of the 
availability of funds to cover the cost 
of the increase. 

It was also 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

VOTED : That, the President of the University is 

hereby authorized to apply the provisions 
of chapter 635 of the Acts of nineteen 
hundred sixty-six to provide for a six 
percent increase in weekly pay rates to 
all non-professional employees paid from 
other than state funds who in the judgment 
of the President are in categories of em- 
ployment equivalent to the intent and 
scope of the Act, provided, however, that 
in the case of those paid from institute, 
grant, or contract funds the recommenda- 
tion and certification of availability of 
funds by the principal investigator or 
director shall be a prerequisite of such 
increase. 

It was then 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

VOTED : That, there be established three new position 

titles as follows: 



Professional Technician UM I 
Professional Technician UM II 
Professional Technician UM III 



Minimums 
Weekly Annual 
$134.61 $7,000 
192.30 
230.76 



10,000 
12,000 



Maximums 

Weekly Annual 

$211.53 $11,000 

250.00 13,000 

288.46 15,000 



The meeting then recessed to the Dukes Room at the Student 
Union for luncheon where discussion was resumed. 

Dean Spielman of the College of Agriculture joined the 
meeting to discuss the Control Services. He introduced his 
colleagues: Assistant to the Dean Allan, Dr. McKenzie, Dr. Fox, 
Professor Kuzmeski, to the meeting. Copies of bulletins and 
memoranda indicating the scope of Control Services and their opera- 
tions were circulated. 



I 



2793 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion followed on the broad field of state regula- 
tory functions. The question considered was whether control 
services belong in the College or in the State Department of Agri- 
culture. It was agreed that future meetings should be devoted to 
the subject. 

Dean Spielman made a strong plea for separate budget con- 
sideration. It has been his desire to have regulatory functions 
identified separately in the University budget as distinct from 
programs related strictly to the instructional program. The 
Treasurer indicated that this has now been done. The control ser- 
vices budget amounts to $4-22,000. 

The sense of the discussion was that experiment station 
and related work were closely related to the University, but that 
regulatory work (i.e. enforcement of regulations) is much less so 
and in many states is a function of the Department of Agriculture. 
Mr. Lambson commented that Connecticut simplifies this problem by 
compiling and publishing a list for easy reference by the user. 

Dean Spielman concluded by stating that actually the 
control programs are for the benefit of the general public as con- 
sumers and not specifically for the farmer. The programs are 
actually related to the broad field of public health. The Provost 
agreed to plan a series of meetings on the College of Agriculture. 

Trustee Rowland emphasized that an outside group should 
study this problem, rather than persons selected from within the 
campus or the Board of Trustees. The Provost stated that Dean 
Spielman has come up with a very excellent list of people who 
could serve on such a committee. Trustee McNamara suggested that 
persons from the agricultural industry as well as educators should 
be included. Mr. Lambson concurred, adding it would make for 
better acceptance. 

President Lederle pointed out that the present Control 
Services staff is a dedicated and efficient group of individuals, 
well qualified to perform their tasks. He commended their service. 
He pointed out that the problems related to the Control Service 
centered strictly around the question of the appropriateness of 
this function as a University activity. 



The meeting was adjourned 




I 



Robert/ J '. McCartney 
Secretary/ Board of Trust/! 



2794 



COMMITTEE 



Salary- 
Adjustments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
October 17, 1966, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Healey, Pumphret, Haigis, 
Emerson, Lyons; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Dean Redfern, 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Business Manager Grady, Staff 
Assistant Myers. 



Chairman Boyden opened the meeting, and President Lederle 
led the discussion of the first item on the agenda, salary pro- 
posals. 

Provost Tippo was asked to step out briefly. There was 
general discussion of salary levels for the President, Chancellor, 
Dean of the Medical School and others exempted from ceilings as 
authorized by the recent Salary Relief Bill. 

Discussed also were details pertaining to the need for a 
change in ratings of the professional staff and the effect of the 
6% overall increase on University salaries generally. 

Clarification was offered on the interrelation of the 5% 
merit increase authorized for February 1, 1967, the 6% overall in- 
crease, and a prior 10% increase for non-professional employees 
which the Legislature earlier voted. 

After further explanation and interpretation, the Presi- 
dent suggested that the entire matter be tabled and that the 6% 
overall increase be processed in a routine fashion on the effective 
date, November 27. The 5% merit increments will be applied as 
appropriate on February 1, 1967. 

Treasurer Johnson added that a useful purpose would be 
achieved in the long run by rounding out the salary figures on an 
annual basis. This would make the schedule look more professional. 
This matter was taken under advisement. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To grant immediate merit salary increments 
to the Provost of the University and to the 
Chancellor of the UM/Boston, establishing 
their salaries at the current salary ceiling 
of the University. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo rejoined the meeting at this point along 
with Business Manager Gerald Grady and Staff Assistant Sidney- 
Myers. 

Treasurer Johnson explained new statutes which made it 
possible for state employees to engage in collective bargaining. 
He cited rules and regulations as to how this may be implemented. 
This development has been discussed with knowledgeable faculty 
members and with the staff of the Labor Research Center. We are 
now at the point where the MSEA group on campus has petitioned the 
President for an election to have this group designated as the 
official collective bargaining unit under new statute. They have 
requested action to be taken during the month of October and were 
advised that the University would endeavor to meet this request. 

Business Manager Grady circulated to each member of the 
meeting a document entitled "Rules and Regulations of the Bureau 
of Personnel and Standardization Regarding Authorization of State 
Employees to Join and to Act on Behalf of Certain Organizations 
Representing Employees of the Commonwealth." (Document 67-015 is 
attached hereto) 

Mr. Grady noted that these regulations are not in final 
form, but are sufficiently firm so that they can be studied and 
evaluated. 

He next circulated to each member of the meeting, copies 
of a letter and attachment dispatched by President Lederle, under 
date of October 20, 1966, to Mr. Leonard A. Kelley, Director of 
Personnel and Standardization of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
State House, Boston. (Document 67-016 is attached) This letter 
describes what constitutes an "employee unit". 

Trustee Healey summed up his understanding of the process 
to determine an employee unit designation as follows: (l) a group 
files a petition to become the exclusive bargaining unit. 
(2) the agency head sets in motion a process to determine which 
employee group is the official one for bargaining purposes. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that Mr. Grady and his people 
have been meeting with two groups, the MSEA and representatives of 
AFL-CIO 1776, about once a month in order to keep channels of 
communication open. 

In answer to a query, Mr. Grady responded that a public 
hearing had been held; also that representatives of the labor 
groups were present, but they did not come forward and participate 
in the meeting. 

Mr. Grady stated that both campus groups, MSEA and 
AFL-CIO 1776, have had ready access tohis office as well as to 
campus mailing facilities and the University Bulletin, all on an 
equal basis. 



i.) 



Employee 

Unit 

Designation 



2796 



COMMITTEE 



Director of 

University 

Libraries 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Grady emphasized that the determination of which unit 
represents the official group for collective bargaining is now in 
University hands. It has been determined that such designation 
will apply to the Amherst campus only. 

Mr. Myers expressed view that there had been no prior 
legal verdict with respect to designation of employee units and 
research had brought up nothing on this point. There was exchange 
of views and it was the consensus that the matter should be brought 
to the full board without recommendation of the Executive Committee. 
Trustee Healey felt it would be useful to have the advantage of an 
opinion from Trustee Thompson. The matter was thereupon referred 
to the full Board of Trustees for disposition. 

Mr. Grady distributed copies of Proposals (Document 
67-017 is attached). 

It was thereupon 

VOTED That the Executive Committee acknowledge 
receipt of the proposals, which will be 
forwarded to the full Board of Trustees 
without recommendation. 

Mr. Grady and Mr. Myers left the meeting. 

President Lederle and Provost Tippo described the growing 
problem of library expansion to a million volumes by 1970, and in- 
dicated that, in conformance with practice at many large universi- 
ties, it is now desirable to create the position of Director of 
University Libraries. The committee was informed that the Univer- 
sity Librarian, when informed of this, stated that he would file 
suit against the University. 

After further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To endorse the recommendation of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy as follows: 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they establish the position of 
Director of University Libraries with 
the following duties: 

Serve as the chief administrative officer 
of the library system of the campus at 
Amherst: make recommendations to the 
Provost on appointment, reappointment, 
promotion, termination, tenure of library 
staff members; plan and direct the services 
and activities of the several libraries 
and their staffs; report to the Provost 
of the University. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



279? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The University Librarian's duties are rede- 
fined as follows: 

Perform such professional library duties 
as may be assigned by the Director of 
University Libraries. 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they appoint Professor David Clay acting 
Director of Libraries, pending a national 
search for a director. 

The meeting proceeded to the matter of Budget Transfers. 
Chancellor Ryan explained that he has more students than 
anticipated. This requires expenditure of funds beyond those 
budgeted for laboratory equipment. 

Mr. Johnson stated that to solve this problem, he con- 
tacted the Chairman of the Board and was granted authority to 
transfer funds from #13 account to #15 account for this purpose. 

It was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve a transfer from 
1350-02-13 - Supplies of $50,000.00 
to 1350-02-15 - Equipment to cover 
emergency need for teaching equipment 
for unanticipated larger enrollments 
in certain science courses at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Boston. 

Adjustment of 1968 budget was requested by Treasurer 
Johnson. The budget was approved at the last meeting, but since 
that time word has been received from the Budget Bureau that there 
will be a 53rd week in the fiscal year 1968. 

Accordingly, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they adjust the 1968 Budget Requests 
in accordance with instructions received 
from the State Budget Bureau to include 
the salary figures for the 53rd week of 
fiscal year 1968, and to further adjust 
salary figures to properly reflect cer- 
tain stationary salary increases by pro- 
grams. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that the Board had authorized 
three people to sign for the University such documents and instru- 
ments relating to expenditures of funds required in the course of 
day to day business. These three have been the President, 



Budget 

Transfers, 

UIvv / Boston 



Adjustments, 
1968 Request 
Budgets 



2798 



COMMITTEE 



Signatures 
on Documents 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary and Treasurer. The volume of business is now such that 
three additional persons should be approved. It was then moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following officers of the University of 
Massachusetts are each authorized, in their 
capacities as officers, to sign and execute 
singly and without any co- signature any and 
all documents and instruments relating to 
expenditures of funds, requests for funds, 
vouchers, warrants, schedules, invoices, 
certificates and also all documents and instru- 
ments of every nature and kind as all the 
aforesaid may from time to time be required 
to be drawn or executed under the provisions 
of M.G.L. Chapter 75, Section 8: 

John W. Lederle, President 
Robert J. McCartney, Secretary 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 
Robert H. Brand, Associate Treasurer 
L. Lawrence Taylor, Controller 
William H. Maus, Assistant Controller 

The meeting next moved to a discussion of the master plan. 
Due to the passage of time and the unexpected advancement of an 
appointment with Mayor Collins to 2:00 p.m., it was felt that this 
matter should be tabled until the next meeting. ' 

The listing of honorary degree candidates for 1967 was 
circulated. Discussion was held. The matter is also to be re- 
considered at the next meeting of the committee, to be held 
Saturday at 8:30 a.m. in the Faculty Club of the University at 
Amherst, prior to the meeting of the full Board of Trustees at 
10:00 a.m. 

The meeting was^^djourned at 1:55 p.m. 

cr. 



. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, ^Board of Trustees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October 20, 1966, 12 Noon, Parlor D., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Rowland; 
Chancellor Ryan, Secretary McCartney. 

Present by 

Invitation : Messrs. Becker, Brown, Gagnon, 

Goodwin, Kaplan, MacCombie, 

Powers, A. Ryan, James Ryan, 

Salzman, Starr, Tanimoto, Walter, 

Weaver. 

Chairman Troy opened the meeting with a statement that 
the Trustees take great interest in the University of Massachusetts^ 
Boston. He asked for Chancellor Ryan's comments on the library 
problem, the first item on the agenda. 

The Chancellor stated that every faculty member present 
represented nine or ten others on the staff who have equal interest 
and concern with the matters to be discussed. 

Chancellor Ryan then turned the discussion over to 
Dr. Richard Powers, Chairman of the Library Committee, member of 
the UM/Boston Senate Executive Committee and Professor of History. 

Dr. Powers had circulated to the meeting copies of Re- 
port of the Library Committee, University of Massachusetts/Boston 
(Document 67-021 attached hereto). 

Dr. Powers read sections of the aforementioned report. 
The sum of the matter is that serious deficits exist in the 
UM/Boston library in terms of personnel, funds and the acquisition 
of volumes. In addition a severe shortage of space for the 
present and future planned volume of reference material exists. 
Keen disappointment was expressed at the drastic cut in the budget 
for library purposes, as well as the apparent future prospects for 
increased funds for this much needed resource. Reference was made 
to assurances given to new faculty members concerning projected 
library development in keeping with the institution's aspirations 
for excellence. It was indicated that many of the staff joined 
the University with the building of an adequate library as part of 
the inducement. It will be a contributing factor to loss of some 
outstanding faculty personnel if the situation continued. 

The steps taken to arrive at the report and the inten- 
sive study of the situation was delineated by both Dr. Powers and 
Chancellor Ryan. It was reiterated that the quality of new faculty 
we are able to attract is affected by the quality of library. 



2799 



General 
Discussion 
UM/Boston 
Problems 



The Library 
Problem 



2800 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



General discussion developed, with Trustee Haigis 
initiating an inquiry into whether emergency steps had been insti- 
tuted, i.e. making use of other facilities such as Northeastern' s 
library, the Boston Public Library, and facilities in neighboring 
institutions. Professor Powers replied that the libraries of near- 
by institutions are also taxed to capacity with their own students. 
Cooperation with other institutions is no solution. We must de- 
velop our own facilities as soon as possible. 

Chairman Troy brought up the matter of space requirements 
in the course of the next five years and the question of whether 
this would complicate the problem of qualitative library acquisi- 
tions. Dr. Powers affirmed that additional space would be required, 
Chancellor Ryan indicated that the general space problem was a 
special consideration in itself to be covered in detail later on in 
the meeting. 

Trustee Haigis inquired whether the possibility of a 
mezzanine in the library area had been explored. Chancellor Ryan 
replied in the affirmative. The conclusion was that the expense of 
adding such a facility would be prohibitive. 

It was concluded that the University would be better 
advised to house the library in the present building and go outside 
for additional classrooms and office space. 

Chairman Troy queried on the present status of processing 
books on hand. Professor Powers indicated that the situation re- 
mains constant: 15,000 volumes on shelves; 15,000 yet to go on 
shelves; 8,000 on order. Five thousand volumes were processed 
during the summer. This represents an accelerated rate, due partly 
to the fact that some items were in sets and required less time for 
handling. 

Trustee Lyons commented that, even if financial support 
for additional library books were available, we couldn't put them 
on the shelves fast enough to be of benefit to the students or pro- 
fessors before next year. Approximately 1200 volumes per month 
are processed. It was noted that the program must be backed up 
with staff or the books will remain uncatalogued and unavailable for 
use. The possibility of a crash program to put all available books 
on the shelves was considered. After discussion, which included 
reference again to lack of space, Trustee Lyons stated that he would 
like to have individual faculty members detail their specific needs 
in this direction. 

Dr. James Ryan, professor of Spanish, was asked for his 
estimate of how many books he would require to back up a given 
course. Dr. E. Victor Walter, professor of sociology, was asked 
the same question. Each described the methods used in class and 
the need for many volumes in addition to textbooks purchased by the 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



student for use in the classroom. Needed were: research books, 
volumes of the period in reserve to widen the students' horizon; 
resource studies in ancillary topics and many others. 

Chairman Troy stated his complete understanding of this 
need and the vital necessity for supplying adequate resources for 
students to use in connection with their program of studies. 

Dr. Alvan Ryan, Chairman of the Division of Humanities, 
concurred, as did Dr. Becker, Chairman of the Division of Physical 
and Natural Sciences, who said he has students who are forced to 
use the personal libraries of faculty members in order to have 
access to resource material. 

The possibility was suggested that each professor pur- 
chase a needed reference book personally and allow students to use 
it. Chairman of the Library Committee Powers said this would not 
begin to solve the problem, since one of the great needs if 
"backfiles" (research and reference material) which is important 
to students preparing papers. 

President Lederle commented that Dr. Powers could 
probably pinpoint the needs if necessary, to indicate the areas 
most pressing. He considered whether, (until we have permanent 
site and a 600,000 volume collection) a basic library of 75-100, 00C 
volumes would allow students to do research and papers, combining 
these volumes with those available in local libraries, i.e. Boston 
Public Library. 

Dr. James Ryan felt that would be inadequate as four to 
five thousand volumes are required for Spanish on the under- 
graduate level alone. 

President Lederle pointed out that Amherst and Mount 
Holyoke Colleges have libraries of about 4-00,000 volumes. They 
are considered to be doing a good job and have done so for 100 
years. He queried what would provide a reasonable answer to our 
problem? What constitutes an ideal versus a good collection? 

Several possibilities were explored on the space problem. 
Dr. Paul Gagnon, a member of the Executive Committee, described 
graphically conditions in the present building, stating that it was 
dangerously crowded "physically and mentally." For example, there 
are 252 study spaces in the building for an average "population" 
at any given hour of 1200 persons. Students are turned away to 
study in their automobiles or in the lobbies or cafeterias. This 
is a most unsatisfactory and "almost impossible" atmosphere which 
is not conducive to study. The elevators have also been employed 
for study purposes. Further concern was expressed by the faculty 
about a general fire hazard. Even if we could add classrooms for 
next year at 100 Arlington Street, we should not do so. We could 
not maintain a proper minimum of safety. 



2801 



The Space 
Problem 



2802 



COMMITTEE 



The Research 

Support 

Problem 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Haigis was posed a question by Trustee Iyons as 
to feasibility of several of the proposed solutions for the con- 
gested conditions; also the alternatives prof erred in the way of 
other auxiliary locations. The long-term use was explored in 
discussion; as was the possibility of expert evaluation of the 
premises by Heller Associates, Drummey, Rosane and Anderson or a 
similar consulting firm. 

Chancellor Ryan pointed out again the great need for 
speed in setting plans for 1967-68, as this is related to the re- 
cruitment of faculty and staff, and the accommodation of students. 

A suggestion was made that, after alleviating the space 
problem and library problem moderately, student enrollment might 
have to be curtailed unless ample additional space is forthcoming. 

Chairman Troy noted that these matters deserved to come 
to the attention also of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 
The establishment of priorities will become very important. It was 
noted that the principal priority is for additional space. 

At this point in the meeting Dr. Ernest Becker, Chairman 
of the Division of Physical and Natural Sciences and professor of 
chemistry, addressed the group. Documents 67-022, 67-023 and 67-024 
were circulated to the Trustees. Dr. Becker stated that, when the 
staff was recruited, a commitment was made to them concerning the 
quality and scope of the UM/Boston program. Achieving the goals 
set may clearly become impossible with a continuing lack of "shop" 
support for faculty members interested In doing research. This 
problem is fully outlined in Document 67-025. Several courses 
simply cannot be offered at this time due to the lack of proper 
laboratory space and equipment. 

Chairman Troy thanked Dr. Becker for his presentation of 
facts and asked for comment from Dr. Nevin Weaver, chairman of the 
Admissions Committee, and professor of biology. Dr. Weaver stated 
that he is badly handicapped by lack of space; and was unable to 
inaugurate advanced courses this academic year because of a lack 
of laboratory and equipment. Unless remedied, this situation will 
result in the loss of leading faculty to other institutions. 

Dr. George Salzman, member of the Executive Committee and 
professor of physics stated that the problem in his area is a 
little different. The department employs both experimental and 
theoretical physicists and the experimental physicists need room 
for carrying on research. 

In summary, Professor Weaver stressed the importance from 
the beginning of bringing together a faculty of distinguished 
persons. It is also Important to provide conditions that will hold 
such a faculty together. 



2803 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Lederle commented that two avenues might have 
to be considered, if legislative support remains inadequate: 

1. Limit the UM/B enrollment to the capacity 
of present facilities. 

2. Curtail normal development of new programs 
of study for which space and equipment are 
not provided, awaiting location on a perma- 
nent site. 

Expressing the hope that such curtailment would not be 
necessary, the President asked the group for suggestions or 
thoughts on how the administration could get these points through 
to the Legislature. Chairman Troy stated that this may have to be 
handled on a number of levels. 

Trustee Lyons suggested that a presentation similar to 
the one given today before the committee might be made with the 
press present. Trustee Haigis observed that the Governor should 
attend meetings whenever possible and delegate a representative to 
attend when he is unable to be present. Chairman Troy noted that 
there is an educational problem involved as far as the public and 
the legislature is concerned. 

President Lederle stated that he could not give positive 
assurances on legislative action. We have been moving ahead. 
Everything depends on a forward looking, cooperative attitude 
about these problems on the part of the executive and legislative 
branches of the state government. 

Chancellor Ryan expressed appreciation on behalf of 
himself and the IJM/B faculty for the opportunity to present his 
case. 

Chairman Troy stated that he had found the meeting very 
illuminating. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:55 p.m. 




cCartney 
Board of T 



I 




2804 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School: 
Chairman of 
Department 
of Surgery 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
October 22, 1966, 8:30 a.m., Faculty Club, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Healey, 
Emerson, Pumphret, Troy; Provost 
Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary/ 
McCartney. 



Chairman Boyden opened the meeting. President Lederle 
stated that the appointment of a consultant and future Chairman of 
the Department of Surgery for the Medical School would soon come 
before the Trustees. This appointment is a major one. Dean Soutter 
would like to have it come up at a later meeting. Further con- 
sideration was deferred for the time being. 

Treasurer Johnson stated there would be three votes 
needed at the full Board of Trustees meeting later this same day, 
and thereupon passed out copies of each. 

The first vote dealt with the leasing of space in the 
Liberty Mutual Building in Boston for use as office space for 
faculty of the UM/B. 

There was discussion involving rate, size of the area and 
legal aspects of the lease. It was stated that Attorney Austin 
Broadhurst of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor had approved the 
agreement. The committee concurred in the evaluation of the arrangef- 
ment. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
in accordance with approval received on 
October 19, 1966, from the State Superin- 
tendent of Buildings, the Treasurer of the 
University, Kenneth W. Johnson, is authorized 
to enter into a tenant-at-will agreement with 
the Prudential Insurance Company of America, 
in a form as presented to the meeting, dated 
October 20, 1966, on file in the Treasurer's 
Office, for approximately 10,000 square feet 
of space on the ninth floor of the Liberty 
Mutual Building located at 30 St. James 
Avenue, Boston, for a monthly rental to 
July 1, 1967, of $3,250.00, with terms, 
options, and renewals as contained therein. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson then stated that the total amount of 
cash variance in the Treasurer's Office tellers' transactions for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1966 amounted to a shortage of 
$64. 95. The committee commented on this exemplary record and it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the cash variances of the receiving 
tellers in the Treasurer's Office in the 
amount of a shortage of $64.95 for the 
year ended June 30, 1966, be written off 
to Trust Fund Interest contingency account. 

The Treasurer next presented the matter of the coopera- 
tive agreement with the Amherst-Pelham Regional District School 
Committee, to provide an educational television link with the 
School of Education. 

Mr. Johnson explained that the University is not planning 
to construct laboratory high school facilities on the campus 
(similar to the Marks Meadow School at the elementary level). 
Thus the proposed TV tie-up is a valuable substitute. It was then 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that President John W. Lederle be 
authorized to enter into a cooperative 
agreement with the Amherst-Pelham Re- 
gional District School Committee for 
the purposes of establishing an educa- 
tional television connection between 
the Amherst Regional High School and 
the University of Massachusetts School 
of Education in the form of agreement 
on file in the Treasurer's Office and 
that Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson is 
authorized to take any and all actions 
necessary to implement said agreement. 

President Lederle then reported on the state audit and 
with Mr. Johnson commented on several points brought out by the 
auditors. It was deemed advisable to have a meeting with the 
state auditor to present the Trustees' position on overhead on 
federal grants and other items. It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the 
purpose of discussing candidates for 
honorary degrees for the 1967 Commence- 
ment. 



2805 



Adjustment 
of Cash 
Variances 



ARHS 
TV Link 
with School 
of Education 



Executive 
Session - 
Honorary 
Degrees 



2806 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



After due discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for 
the purpose of adjournment. 



The meeting was adjourned at 9:37 a.m. 




^UuGv 



Robert [Jl McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 
EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

November 10, 1966, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Lyons, 
McNamara, Rowland; Provost Tippo, 
Chancellor Ryan, Secretary 
McCartney, Dean Redfern. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Dean Hunsberger, Professor Strother, 
Professor Gluckstern. 



Chairman Troy opened the meeting by introducing agenda 
item one: - the Engineering Accreditation Report. It was decided 
to postpone further consideration of this matter until the next 
meeting to be held in Amherst. 

At this point Professor Strother, Head of the Department 
of Mathematics, joined the meeting and presented the exceptional 
qualifications and curriculum vita of an outstanding potential re- 
cruit in his department. He stated that the University's 
mathematics department has gained attention nationwide because of 
its increasing stature. He commented on its relative position 
competitively vis a vis other academic institutions. He earnestly 
encouraged the members of the Board to consider the addition of 
this recruit to the staff. He would be available in the Fall of 
1968. Supporting material was issued to the committee. 



280~ 



^7 



The meeting advanced to agenda item two: 
Appointment in Physics. 



A Major 



Professor Gluckstern, Head of the Department of Physics, 
joined the meeting. He described the future hopes for this de- 
partment in order to insure quality development of the program. 
He is seeking a vigorous, young theoretical physicist. 

Professor Gluckstern then submitted a resume on the pro- 
fessional background (and a partial publications list) of an out- 
standing faculty member whom he recommended for a major appointment 
in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

Chairman Troy recognized Dean Hunsberger who submitted a 
recommendation to the committee for headship of the Department of 
Psychology. 

Supporting material on the qualifications of the potentia: 
new department head was circulated to the committee. Dean 
Hunsberger read pertinent excerpts which he felt to be of special 
interest. 



Engineering 

Accreditation 

Report 



Major 

Appointment 
in 
Mathematics 



Major 

Appointment 
in Physics 



Headship of 
Department 
of Psychology 



2808 



COMMITTEE 



Approved 

Changes, 

Faculty 

Senate 

Constitution 



Departmentali- 
zation, School 
of Home 
Economics 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Hunsberger reminded the meeting that the Department 
of Psychology has been recently evaluated by a distinguished team 
of outside experts. Provost Tippo noted that the department has 
unanimously recommended the faculty member under discussion as 
their number one choice for head of department. Chairman Troy in- 
quired whether this man was an experimental psychologist. Dean 
Hunsberger 's answer was in the affirmative, adding that his 
specialty was the field of "learning". 

Provost Tippo observed that the visiting committee which 
encouraged the recruitment of this individual was an able and 
distinguished group. He recommended that he be invited to join the 
staff . 

Chairman Troy discussed the matter of salaries for 
unusually distinguished faculty recruits, and invited comment. 
There was exchange of views and Trustee Lyons posed the question 
of what kind of priority should be placed on this calibre of man 
insofar as departmental need is concerned. 

President Lederle expressed the view that, aside from a 
high salary offer, new distinguished faculty ought to join the staff 
because they believe in the goals and purposes of the University. 
Chairman Troy felt that nonetheless we should be realistic in 
attracting quality personnel. 

There was further discussion and exchange of views on the 
matter of salaries, both for the aforementioned proposed appoint- 
ments and in general. 

Chairman Troy stated that the committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy, having reviewed the qualifications of these 
three persons, will strongly recommend their acceptance by the full 
Board of Trustees at the following salaries: $30,000, $27,000, 
$26,500. 

Provost Tippo next presented proposed changes in the 
Faculty Senate Constitution. There were no questions or comments 
and accordingly motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the proposed changes in the Faculty Senate 
Constitution as detailed in Document 67-030, 
attached hereto, be approved. 

The next item, proposed appointment of a Chairman, De- 
partment of Surgery, was put over until the luncheon meeting, at 
which time Dean Soutter would join the meeting and present the case 

Provost Tippo presented agenda item six: Departmentaliza- 
tion of the School of Home Economics. He described the current 
organization of the school as functioning in "areas programs". 
They now propose to become departmentalized. He assured the 
committee this would not increase expenses in the five areas under 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

consideration. Discussion ensued, including broad elucidation of 
the content of some of the courses (i.e. Child Development vs 
Human Development, etc.) and the reason for their inclusion in 
this academic program rather than in some other area of the Uni- 
versity. It was concluded, after explanation, that they were 
logically included as part of the curriculum of the School of Home 
Economics. 

Chairman Troy questioned the necessity for considering 
a change in the organization pattern of the school at this time. 
The Provost submitted that (l) it would improve the administration 
of these areas and (2) improve the prestige in which the programs 
and the School as a whole are held. 

President Lederle commented, since the move will add no 
cost to the University, and departmentalization has been under 
discussion for about five years, the proposal seems feasible and 
logical. 

Provost Tippo agreed to assemble the key persons from 
this division at a later date so that the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy could meet with them, at which time a decision 
could be made. 

Chairman Troy introduced agenda item seven: Discussion 
of Control Services. He outlined the previously discussed 
problems, including the fact that the statutes were established 
for consumer services. The question was posed whether these 
functions should be left to continue at the University of Massa- 
chusetts or be vested in the Department of Agriculture. At this 
point the Chairman asked for comments and especially invited con- 
sideration as to whether a separate budget was a good thing. 
Trustees Lambson and McNamara joined in the view that a separate 
budget would be advisable. President Lederle agreed that the 
matter should be raised again when budget hearings are held, 
stating that the Control Services are related to law enforcement, 
yet tend to get confused with the educational program in budget 
evaluations of the University where the number of students are 
divided into the budget to get the cost per student for a Univer- 
sity education. 

Trustee Lambson submitted that the Control Services "do 
not need to hang on the coat tails of the University budget." 
The Legislature, having created these services, should appropriate 
money to carry them on. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Control Services budget be line-itemed 
to make its distinctly non-educational 
character apparent, so that these funds 
will not be charged against the student 
head count as a cost of instruction. 



2809 



Control 
Services 



28" 



COMMITTEE 



Chairman, 
Department of 
Surgery and 
Consultant 
pro tem 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo asked the committee which group they would 
like to meet with next. The Extension Services was selected. 
Chairman Troy expressed the hope that enough time would be made 
available for an adequate discussion. 

Trustee McNamara stated that a study of extension services 
is being made by a special group. He urged the committee to defer 
any recommendations until after report of this special group on 
which both Trustees Lamb son and McNamara are serving. The report 
might become available in January. 

In view of this development, the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy reconsidered and elected to meet with the Experi- 
ment Station personnel next, postponing the meeting with Extension 
Services until the aforementioned State report is available. 

Further discussion of the Control Services was held, in- 
cluding personnel, budgets and physical location. 

President Lederle suggested that the Governor might wish 
to consider this matter with a possible view toward making a 
recommendation. Commissioner of Agriculture McNamara agreed. He 
underscored the value of having the problem exposed to a truly 
realistic review by competent, experienced people, adding that they 
need not be educators. 

Chairman Troy considered whether this matter should be 
referred to the full Board of Trustees to have them recommend the 
initiation of such a study. Trustees McNamara and Lambson stated 
that the annual Farm Bureau meeting will be held next week and it 
is possible that this topic will be included in their agenda. The 
matter was therefore left for later consideration by the Faculty 
and Educational Policy Committee. 

The meeting was recessed for lunch at 12:10 p.m. 

The meeting was resumed at 1:25 p.m. Chancellor Ryan, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Gagnon, Trustee Plimpton and Messrs. Littlefield 
and Hugill joined the meeting. 

Chairman Troy introduced Dean Soutter to the committee's 
deliberations, in support of agenda item five: Proposed Appoint- 
ment of a Chairman, Department of Surgery. 

Dean Soutter read a previously prepared summary, copies 
of which had been supplied to the members present. These papers 
described the distinguished career, educational background and 
exceptional qualifications of the proposed appointee. 

Dean Soutter is hopeful. (l) that the appointee will 
assume the duties of Chairman, Department of Surgery, when the 
Medical School is ready to begin operation, (2) that the salary 
will be commensurate with that discussed ($30,000 range), (3) that, 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the meantime, the committee will see fit to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees that the appointee be retained as a consultant, 
part time, on the basis of a $5,000 annual fee. 

Discussion was held and every facet of the foregoing 
explored. Dr. Soutter expanded on the problems surrounding the 
acquisition of outstanding personnel for the Medical School, in- 
cluding his acute problem on salaries for such key men. These 
problems are complicated by the time lapse in a fast moving field. 
The meeting was in complete sympathy and understanding with the 
Dean's summation and, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the candidate proposed by Dean Soutter be 
appointed Consultant in the Department of 
Surgery, with the view' that, by opening 
date of the Medical School, he will be 
available as full Professor and Chairman 
of that department. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:55 p.m. 




Robert J. McCar 
icre/fcary, Board of Trustees 



2811 



<> 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School - 
preliminary 
plans 



Accreditation 
of Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

November 10, 1966. 2:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Gordon, Maginnis, 
Plimpton; Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer 
Johnson, Dean Gagnon, Dean Soutter, 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Messrs. Littlefield and Hugill; 
also Messrs. Rosane and Rittenberg 
of Drummey, Rosane and Anderson. 



Chairman Haigis called the meeting to order and intro- 
duced agenda item four: MEDICAL SCHOOL - PRELIMINARY PLANS. 

Dean Lamar Soutter of the Medical School advised the 
Trustees on the status of the application for federal funds. The 
architects are reluctant to have a delay. Health, Education and 
Welfare in Washington, however, has indicated that the chances of 
gaining a high priority for much money in November are poor. The 
Dean was advised not to pursue this. The architects, however, com- 
pleted the plans by November 1. 

Present plans call for talcing the application to 
Washington in December to get the comments and recommendations of 
H.E.W. We will then be in a position to alter the plans as 
necessary and resubmit them in January. In the meantime, the 
Medical School has been given accreditation by the AMA. and AMC. 
This is merely verbal, but official written notice will follow. 

In response to a question from Trustee Gordon, Dean 
Soutter indicated the maximum amount possible to receive for re- 
search would be 50%; for education, 75%. He added that the chances 
of getting the full amount are remote, due to a variety of circum- 
stances, mainly government practice and procedure. 

Dean Soutter then discussed the current situation on land 
for the Worcester Medical School. An actual deed is not yet at 
hand from the Department of Mental Health as per the statute; the 
Syrian Church has not yet submitted an agreement, though one is ex- 
pected this month. The land belonging to the Sisters of Notre Dame, 
to the north, is available as discussed in a prior meeting. The 
lawyer for this group is anxious for us to proceed with our surveys 
and make some decision, as a nursing home also wishes to occupy 
some of this available land. Also, the H. E. Shaw Building acqui- 
sition should be stepped up. Dean Soutter expressed the hope that 
these three areas would move ahead as quickly as possible. 1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson stated no vote would be submitted at 
this meeting on the foregoing; its purpose is merely informative. 

Chairman Haigis advised the meeting that no meeting as 
yet is scheduled on the further acquisition of land for the 
purposes outlined. President Lederle said that the next meeting 
should clarify the acquisition situation. 

Chairman Haigis advised the meeting that statute re- 
quires giving a year's notice in advance of tearing down structures 
on property about to be occupied. He described the buildings affec 
and motion was made and seconded and thereupon 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize the Treasurer to notify the 
Department of Mental Health that certain 
farm and other structures shown on the pre- 
liminary site plan for the Medical School 
will be taken over by the University at 
the start of construction for the Medical 
School buildings on or about December, 
1967. 

Chairman Haigis introduced Mr. H. J. Littlefield, 
Planning Officer, to discuss agenda item one - Space for HM/Boston 
for next five years. 

Mr. Littlefield advised the meeting of his intensive 
study and evaluation of the premises now occupied by UM/Boston, 
including recently acquired space in the Liberty Mutual Building. 
He related the footage to the student occupancy. He described 
the overcrowded conditions; the continuing lack of adequate space, 
especially in view of the commuter nature of the student body and 
their need for study areas. In summary, he stated it is not 
possible to take in any more students in succeeding academic years 
without many major changes. 

Mr. Littlefield stated that his intensive survey indi- 
cated the space is being used extremely well at the present time. 
He alluded to the Drummey, Rosane, Anderson report and stated the 
entire matter really requires a study of what use is intended for 
this building: sciences or humanities, laboratory and research 
space or classrooms exclusively. 

Treasurer Johnson stated there would have to be another 
renovation for the fall of 1968. Thus, there still is one more 
renovation phase to go after that now being designed. In terms of 
total enrollment, the facilities are already crowded this year. 
Renovation will enable us to squeeze in another 1,000 students. 

Trustee Maginnis inquired how many were expected to 
enroll in the fall. President Lederle stated 2,600. Trustee 
Maginnis felt that we would then hit a top level that is Going to 
be permanent until more buildings and space are acquired. 



2813 



ted 



Boston 
Space - 
Five Year 
Projection 



2814 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Ryan commented that there should be a prior 
discussion or a decision formally on setting a student enrollment 
limit. Discussion of facilities needs could then follow. 

The Chancellor described the current situation: student 
crowding, faculty needs, research needs, study space requirements. 
He described the present use of the facilities and alternate uses. 
Chancellor Ryan expressed the view that the clearest thing coming 
out of the space utilization study is that space is needed outside 
of the building besides faculty-office space. 

Chancellor Ryan analyzed the space (Phase II Renovations) 
as reflected on the plans. The question: How big are we going to 
get? Chancellor Ryan endorsed Planning Officer Littlef ield ' s view 
that UM/B is underspaced. He cannot anticipate going two or three 
more years without providing additional accommodations for under- 
graduate students. 

Trustee Maginnis asked how many students actually could 
the UM/B take care of and Chancellor Ryan responded, 2,150. 
Mr. Hugill stated that basically the work in Phase II should have 
been done about September, but funds were not available. 

There was wide discussion as to plans for facilities to 
take care of the junior class; also, satellite space outside of the 
building for the senior class, when this becomes necessary. It was 
said that emphasis could be the sciences in renovating the present 
structure so that these disciplines could continue on in the present 
building when subsequent auxiliary space becomes available. 

Chancellor Ryan stated the situation was not simply one 
of growth of the student body, but also, the unavailability of 
buildings. It is not possible at this time, for example, to pro- 
pose a figure of 3,600 as top enrollment. The Chancellor would 
like a "blank check" vote to permit a continued search for . ■ 
accommodations for a total student body of this size. 

The library situation was discussed. 

Trustee Gordon queried whether Phase II Renovations are 
wise and necessary. The answer was affirmative. 

Chancellor Ryan said there should be some outside class- 
room facilities to reduce traffic in the building. He agreed to 
prepare an estimate of needs for the November 21 meeting. The 
committee agreed to await the Chancellor's presentation. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that the Sawyer building should 
not be considered if it is not what we want. We must look ahead 
to acquiring satisfactory facilities for a number of years on a 
temporary basis. 



COMMITTEE 



281 5 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Gordon added that when Chancellor Ryan comes 
with the specifications, then we will he in a position to look for 
a building. 

Dean Gagnon stated the importance of planning at least 
two years in advance. To do so, we must have some idea of the 
huilding in order to plan for handling quantities of students, 
types of programs, etc. Advance data and information will have to 
go heyond simple square footage. 

Messrs. Rosane and Rittenberg of Drummey, Rosane and 
Anderson next presented plans for Phase II Renovations, stating 
that these could he carried out within available funds. This would 
not include elevators. 

President Lederle pointed out that a decision should be 
made on whether or not to limit students and programs before moving 
ahead to provide space. 

Trustee Gordon felt that it is practical to offer an 
adequate four-year program, possibly in collaboration with other 
faculties. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the preliminary plans for 
Phase II Renovations for UM/Boston as 
submitted by Drummey, Rosane and Anderson. 

Chairman Haigis reviewed a conversation with the Mayor 
of Boston as to permanent location for the Boston campus. He de- 
tailed the advantages and disadvantages of several locations. A 
deterrent to selecting a down-town Boston location is that it would 
deny the city tax money. Trustee Haigis advanced a possible solu- 
tion. Rather than take land and build upon it structures which 
would be nontaxable due to their academic use.... why not eliminate 
the one greatest disadvantage (utilization of land) by building 
over the land, instead of spreading on to it. In other words, 
build a campus forty or fifty feet in the air. The lower floors 
of such structures would be commercial; the floors above would be 
occupied by the University for academic purposes. 

These possibilities have been explored tentatively with 
some knowledgeable people in government. 

Chairman Haigis described such possibilities as vertical 
transportation; moving stairs; moving floors. He added that this 
plan could be employed in any area of Boston, not necessarily the 
one now established and occupied. 

Trustee Gordon referred back to the Highland Park loca- 
tion. He expressed the hope that Federal Funds could be used to 
solve the problem. 



UM/B Phase II 
Renovation 
Plans 
Approved 



Permanent 

Site, 

UM/Boston 



2816 



COMMITTEE 



Campus 
Center 
Preliminary 
Plans 



Land 

Acquisition 
Amherst Campus 



Kelley 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion followed on the availability and speed with 
which Federal Funds could be secured. Trustee Gordon alluded to a 
vast amount of programming dollars available. 

The matter was left that all facts should be assembled 
and all facets explored as to available funds, and the time elements 
involved. 

Chairman Haigis took the position personally that he be- 
lieves our mandate and commitment is to the core city. Motion was 
made, seconded and it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the University remain committed to the 
City of Boston and provide support to ex- 
plore all possibilities for locating a 
permanent campus in this location. 

Chairman Haigis next introduced the agenda item five: 
the Campus-Center Preliminary Plans. Treasurer Johnson described 
the blueprints as laid on the table. After general discussion, it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept the preliminary plans for the 
"Campus Center". 



of 1968. 



It is expected the Campus Center will be open in the fall 



President Lederle commented on custom for naming of these 
buildings, including the possibility of honoring alumnus Murray 
Lincoln who had been most generous to the University. 



six: 



The meeting then moved to the discussion of agenda item 
LAND ACQUISITION - Amherst Campus. 



Treasurer Johnson introduced the matter of 7.2 acres of 
land west of the Town sewer plant, adjacent to the campus near the 
Kelley Farm. He stated that appraisals differ widely. He 
suggested talcing this property by eminent domain at $5,000. It was 
then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they purchase or take by eminent domain in 
fee, that property whose owners of record 
are shown to be John S.. Kelley, Jr. and 
Edward F. Kelley, which is located at the 
terminus of Old North Hadley Road, on the 
easterly side of Route 116 in Hadley, 
Massachusetts, and more particularly 
described as Parcels #1 and #2 Hampshire 
County Registry Book 1053, Page 259 and that 
the purchase price for said property be five 
thousand dollars ($5,000.00). Taxes to be 
pro rated. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer next introduced the subject of the Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates Incorporated agreement. After discussion, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the following: 

Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. 
Schedule of Hourly Rates 

Services shall be provided on a time basis 
computed at the following hourly rates: 

$20.00 per hour for Principals 
15.00 per hour for Associates 
12.50 per hour for Senior Technical Staff 
10.00 per hour for Junior Technical Staff 
8.00 per hour for Draftsmen 

These rates include up to three copies of all 
drawings, specifications, plans, reports and 
cost estimates. Additional copies of prints, 
travel expenses and long-distance telephone 
calls are reimbursable at cost. 

Models, special renderings, fees for special 
consultants and photographic services are con- 
sidered as extras and are also reimbursable at 
cost. They shall be incurred only with 
specific approval by the client. 

Treasurer Johnson stated he had received a request from 
the Alumni Office to improve the basement area of Memorial Hall. 

Trustee Gordon reviewed the matter of this Alumni request 
for remodeling of the basement of Memorial Hall. The cost, he 
said, .would be in the neighborhood of $70,000. The only thing re- 
maining to be done is to name the architect. He suggested we move 
ahead. 

Trustee Crowley pointed out that Memorial Hall is 
basically an Alumni House, and it would enhance the property to 
have available some capacity for light, informal food service. 

President Lederle stated that nothing official has been 
received on this and a letter has been requested. In addition the 
administration does not think a cafeteria, as suggested, is a good 
idea in the Memorial Hall location for several reasons: (l) the 
Student Union is nearby and available (2) the road will soon be 
blocked off in accord with the campus Master Plan. 



281 



Hourly Fee: 

Sasaki, 

Dawson, 

DeMay 

Associates 

Agreement 



Improvements 
to Memorial 
Building 



2818 



COMMITTEE 



Razing of 
Broadfoot 
House 



Rubin 
Proposal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion ensued as to the reason for the request and 
the benefits of such an informal area. President Lederle and 
Treasurer Johnson agreed that there was no objection to serving 
facilities or a kitchenette. The matter was left for discussion 
at the next Buildings and Grounds Committee meeting at which time 
Mr. Evan Johnston will be invited to attend and support the proposal 

President Lederle encouraged the Alumni association to 
communicate with the administration on any matter whatsoever at any- 
time. 

Treasurer Johnson stated an employee is moving out of the 
Broadfoot House and it would be expedient at this time to dispose 
of it. Motion was made, seconded and, it v/as 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the razing of the Broadfoot House to 
make room for Master Plan developments 
on the campus. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that Mr. Rubin wishes to appear 
before the committee to support his proposal to build 600 apartment 
units. It is Mr. Rubin's view that this project would be to the 
advantage of the University. The Trustees ma.de no commitment. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:4-5 p.m. 




Robert;' J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Ti 



istees 



r 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



281' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 21, 1966, 11:00 a.m., Hancock Room, Statler Hilton Hotel, 

Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Haigis, Lyons, 
Pumphret, Troy; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 
Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Boyden opened the meeting and introduced the 
subject of budget transfers. Treasurer Johnson circulated sub- 
stantiating material, explaining the need for the transfers in 
order to realign accounts in terms of how they are expected to be 
spent during the year. The Treasurer explained the items to be 
transferred and reasons for it as detailed below. 

TRANSFERS BETWEEN SUBSIDIARY ACCOUNTS 
1967 APPROPRIATION 



1350-01 - Amherst 

From: 01 - Salaries, 

To: 02 - Salaries, 

03 - Services, 



permanent positions 
temporary positions 
non-employees 



$1,190,000 
590,000 
600,000 



Subsidiary 
Accounts 



The reason that these funds are surplus to payroll 
requirements in this 01 account for permanent positions 
is that qualified persons could not be recruited on a 
permanent basis. Therefore, the essential work is 
being covered by persons employed on a temporary and 
overtime basis (02) or a part-time or intermittent em- 
ployment under 03. The 03 transfer also covers the 
adjustment for the expanded summer session of 
$110,000.00 and provision for increased student 
employment . 



From: 09 - Farm and Grounds 
To: 05 - Clothing 



$ 



3,200 
3,200 



To provide uniforms for new members of the 
security force . 



1350-02 - Boston 

From: 01 - Salaries, permanent positions 
02 - Salaries, temporary positions 



$ 100,000 
100,000 



This transfer is to provide for temporary em- 
ployees' salaries when permanent positions could not 
be filled with persons qualified to be appointed on a 
permanent basis. 



2820 



COMMITTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Date for 
Master Plan 
Review 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



From: 16 - Rentals 

To: 13 - Library Books & Materials 



$ 25,000 
25,000 



Every effort must be made to increase the library 
as rapidly as possible. Any funds that can be saved 
in other subsidiary accounts are being transferred to 
the library account. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
transfers between subsidiary accounts, 1967 
appropriation be authorized as detailed 
above . 

The matter of Honorary Degrees was introduced to the meet- 
ing. President Lederle reviewed the list as it had left the 
committee. Discussion followed and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To add to the list of proposed Honorary 
Degree Candidates, the name of a 
' distinguished citizen of jthe Commonwealth, 
said addition to be detailed on the con- 
fidential list submitted to the Trustees. 

There was discussion as to the manner ofprocedure and in- 
clusion of names submitted after a list had been compiled and pre- 
liminary review had been made. It was the consensus all names 
should be submitted through normal channels at the time of compila- 
tion of the list for committee consideration. Established policy 
guidelines will be followed and decisions made after appropriate 
review. 

It was also • 

VOTED : That the proposed confidential list of 
honorary degree candidates be referred 
to the Board of Trustees for their 
approval. 

President Lederle stated a date should be set to review 
the master plan. In advance of this the administration should be 
advised by the Trustees exactly what is required. This is a very 
voluminous report. The Executive Committee might wish to indicate 
what areas they wished submitted in attenuated form, i.e. (l) cost; 
(2) personnel; (3) extent of plan. 

December 17 (Saturday) was decided upon as the date for 
the Executive Committee to meet and go over matters of specific 
interest in the master plan. 

Trustee Troy indicated the Faculty and Educational Policy 
Committee, of which he is Chairman, will meet to discuss Sabbatical 
Leaves. Trustee Lyons, Chairman of the Committee on Student 



] 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Activities, expects to calendar a meeting to discuss curfew and 
other pertinent matters. It was suggested that police training be 
added as an agenda topic. 

The meeting then moved to discussion of the proposed in- 
crease in the commencement fee. President Lederle explained that 
commencement costs include lodging and feeding the Commencement 
Band, honorary degree people and distinguished guests, the 
honorarium for the commencement speaker, cost of diplomas, programs 
and cost of setting up the commencement site and a rainy day site. 
A list was supplied to each member of the committee, showing 14 se- 
lected colleges and their fees, as a basis of comparison. After 
discussion, motion was made, seconded and then it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they establish the policy of 
placing the expense of commencement 
exercises and events on a self-support- 
ing basis through the establishment of 
a Commencement Fee of ten dollars 
($10.00) to be assessed all students 
in the last semester or term prior to 
receiving a degree and to authorize the 
establishment of a trust fund entitled 
"Commencement Fund" as a depository 
for said fees and to further authorize 
the Treasurer to receive and disburse 
the income derived from said fee. 

President Lederle introduced the matter of the proposed 
increase in boarding hall rates. Treasurer Johnson circulated to 
each member present a copy of a Survey of Board Rates of Selected 
Universities, dated November 3, 1966. Business Manager Grady and 
Dean Redfern joined the meeting. 

Document 67-029, Proposal for an Increase in Board Rate, 
was supplied to those present and the content discussed and ex- 
plained. This document is attached hereto. 

It was pointed out that reasons for the increase included 
(l) the general inflationary spiral (2) the increase in food costs 
(3) added salary costs for employees resulting from recent salary 
scale increases at the state level. 

In support of the increase, the comparative figures, and 
the substantiating figures, were reviewed by the committee. 
Treasurer Johnson noted that the student paper (THE COLLEGIAN) had 
editorialized in support of the proposed increase. 

There was a feeling of general concern in the meeting for 
the students affected, particularly those who might find difficulty 
in meeting the added costs. Treasurer Johnson stated that 
financial aid is available to those students requiring it through 
part-time employment In the dining commons. Also, it is planned 



283 1 



E s t ab li shment 
of Commence- 
ment Fee and 
Commencement 
Fund 



Boarding 
Hall Rate 
Increase 



/&822 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to offer second servings on main dishes when the new rates take 
effect. 



r 



and it was 



VOTED: 



After further discussion, the motion was made, seconded 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Board Rate at the University Dining 
Commons be increased effective for the 
spring semester, 1967 as follows: 

That, until and subject to further action of 
the Trustees amending the same, the follow- 
ing be and hereby is adopted as the schedule 
of charges for meals to be served commencing 
with the first day of the semester to 
commence in February, 1966 in student dining 
facilities, other than any owned or leased 
by University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority, operated by the Trustees and that 
the following be -and hereby are fixed as the 
fees, rents, rates and other charges for any 
other use of any such facility on and after 
such date: 

Schedule of Charges : 

For 15 meals per week - $220 per semester (l) 

For 21 meals per week - $275 per semester (l) 

(l) in each case excluding meals during 
extended vacation periods. 

Per day - $2.75 (effective for summer school, 
vacation periods, etc.) 



Per meal - Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 
Sunday dinner 



75 cents 
95 cents 

$1.25 

$1.50 



Group meals, conference rates, individual food 
and drink items - such amount as the Treasurer 
of the University shall fix to cover the cost 
of materials and special services plus 
reasonable provision for other costs and 
exoenses. 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Fees, rents, rates and other charges for other 
uses of student dining facilities : 

For rental or other use of all or any part 
of a facility - such amount as the Treasurer 
of the University shall fix to cover the cost 
of any special services plus reasonable pro- 
vision for other costs and expenses. 

Refund Schedule 

A student who withdraws from the University 
after paying a semester meal charge shall be 
entitled to a pro-rata refund on such charge, 
less administrative costs in such amount as 
the Treasurer of the University may fix, pro- 
vided, that no such refund shall be charged 
against any meal charge proceeds which are 
payable to University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority under any Management and Ser- 
vices Agreement relating to any dining 
facility owned or leased by the Authority. 

The Treasurer shall report to the Trustees 
all charges, fees, rents and rates established 
by him under authority of this resolution. No 
such charge, fee, rent or rate so established 
shall be reduced, but may be increased, with- 
out prior approval of the Committee of the 
Trustees on Buildings and Grounds. 

It was further 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That the schedule of charges set forth in the 
foregoing vote be and hereby is recommended 
to University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority for adoption as the schedule of 
charges and other fees for meals served in 
and other uses of dining facilities owned 
or leased by it and that the secretary of 
the Trustees be and he hereby is directed 
to certify these votes to the Authority as 
the writing provided for in Management and 
Services Agreements now in effect between 
the Commonwealth and the Authority pertain- 
ing to such dining facilities. 

It v/as also 

VOTED : That the following be and hereby are recommended 
to the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority (the "Authority") as the rules and 
regulations to be adopted by the Authority to 
insure the use and occupancy of its Seventh 



OQOO 



2824 



COMMITTEE 

Occupancy 
Rules and 
Regulations, 
Seventh 
Project 



Special 
Personnel 
Actions - 
President 
and Provost 



Designation 
of Employee 
Unit 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Project referred to in the Management and Ser- 
vices Agreement dated as of April 1, 1966 be- 
tween the Trustees, acting in the name and on 
behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
and the Authority, namely: 

Rules and Regulations to Insure Use 
and Occupancy of University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority Seventh 
Project 

1. Student purchasing semester meal tickets 
shall be allocated to the Seventh Project 
for purposes of determining the revenues 
therefrom in such numbers as may be re- 
quired pursuant to the Management and 
Services Agreement dated as of April 1, 
1966 pertaining to said Seventh Project. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the Executive Committee that they 
had wished to make l-ecommendations concerning the salaries of the 
Provost and the President at this meeting. The President and 
Provost then left the meeting. 

Treasurer Johnson circulated Document 67-028 and Supplement 
A, entitled "Personnel Actions" dated November 21, 1966. The 
members present examined these, expressed accord, and it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Personnel Actions as set forth 
in attached Document 67-023 be adopted. 

The President and Provost rejoined the meeting. 

Trustee Pumphret read a letter from Trustee Healey, Chair- 
man of the Ad Hoc Committee on Designation of an Employee Unit, 
summarizing the views of this group. 

Trustee Pumphret stated that Chapter 75 of the General Laws 
clearly indicates this responsibility comes under the Board of 
Trustees. The Ad Hoc Committee feels unanimously that the decision 
previously recommended by the Administration is a sound one. 
Trustee Thompson will report on this matter at the meeting of the 
full Board of Trustees later today. 

There was discussion of the scope of the newly established 
position of Director of University Libraries. 



r 






i 



283; 



PS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was also discussion relative to honoring 
distinguished alumnus Murray Lincoln who had contributed so much 
to the University both in material gifts and prestige. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney. 
Secretary, Board of Trustee's 



2826 



COMMITTEE 



Publications 

Commission 

Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

December 3, 1966, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; Trustees 
Croce, Maginnis, McNamara; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 
Miss Coulter 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION! 



I 



Professor Havard; Mr. Lou Gurwitz 

Bette Butler, '67; Women's Judiciary; Kappa 

Alpha Theta Sorority 
John Greenquist, '67; President of Student 

Senate; Residence Hall Counselor 
Jacqueline Hall, '68; Chairman of Women's 

Affairs; Student Life Committee 
Ken Hardy, '67; Chairman of Univ. Reform Comm; 

Adelphia; Residence Hall Counselor 
Eileen White, '67; Student Life Committee; 

Residence Hall Counselor 
Doris Abramson, Chairman of Faculty Senate Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs 
Leon Barron, Faculty Resident at Orchard Hill 

Residential College 
Helen Curtis, Dean of Women 
William F. Field, Dean of Students 
Guy Lucia, Security Housing Officer 
Mark G. Noffsinger, Coordinator of Student 

Activities; Chairman Student Life 
Committee 
Kenneth J. Suid, Staff Assistant, Office of the 

Provost 
Clarence Shute, Master of Southwest Residential 

College 
H. Leland Varley, Master of Orchard Hill Resi- 
dential College 
John C. Welles, Director of Housing 
Monsignor David J. Power, Chaplain 
The Reverend John L. Scott, Chaplain 

Chairman Lyons called the meeting to order and introduced 
Professor Havard to the meeting to submit the Report and Recommenda- 
tions of the University of Massachusetts' Publications Commission. 

Copies of the bound report were distributed in advance of 
the meeting so that the members present here had opportunity to 
read it. 

Professor Havard stated his commission had met once a 
week all during the summer and fall and brought forth the report as 
submitted. He stressed the need for broadening student participation 
in publications, so that the same willing core is not left to hand 



COMMITTEE 



282" 



**?■ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



down its responsibilities as it leaves the office to a similarly 
small group. Professor Havard briefly summarized from the report 
the proposed composition of the Board: (12 persons) 6 students 
(3 elected, 3 appointed by Senate), 5 Faculty Senate appointees, 
1 person from Student Union. The Board will report to the President 
and both Senates through the Dean of Students. 

In response to a query from Trustee Maginnis, Mr. L. 
Gurwitz explained that a committee -will review the credentials of 
persons who are interested in becoming officers of the media, 
instead of the outgoing officer indicating a successor, as some- 
times has been customary in the past. He stated a good deal of 
this depends on mutual respect and good will. This has been evident 
in the meetings held recently, where in every case the votes for 
media officers have been unanimous. 

Trustee Maginnis questioned the use of the broad term 
"communications board" saying it seemed to encompass too many fields 
Substituting the word "media" or some similar term might be 
preferred. He also felt the use of initials (for example RSO) might 
be confusing and that, in a formal agreement, it would be better to 
spell out the names of organizations so that the uninformed would 
have no difficulty understanding the reference. 

It was the consensus that this report was a step in the 
right direction. It was felt it would be helpful to receive 
reports from the new Publications Board on activity during the 
year, as a means of evaluating progress. The committee stressed 
the need to encourage broadening of the recruitment base for 
student editors. 

Professor Havard stated it would be the responsibility of 
the Board to respond to these criticisms from the best standpoint 
possible within the operational standards established. 

Chairman Lyons stated he was impressed by the Report and, 
particularly, by Appendix A. The quality of the COLLEGIAN has 
shown improvement lately, reflecting a general increase of coopera- 
tion and interest. 

Dr. Noff singer said that through the work of the com- 
mission, students and faculty, there has been a great improvement in 
student attitude. Mr. Gurwitz added that the entire experience of 
developing the Report has proved that students, faculty and ad- 
ministration can work together. This has been one of the most 
important aspects of the project. 

Professor Havard stated that a training program for 
Collegian editors is being instituted, in order to qualify reporters 
to advance to higher office. 

There was an exchange of views on whether persons eligible 
to serve on the staff of the Collegian should have a tie-in with a 
Journalism course. Should the Collegian be used as a laboratory? 
Should credit be given for participation as an editor? 



2828 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The amount of time consumed by advisors in conferences 
and counseling was brought out. Mr. Gurwitz felt there should be 
administrative recognition and released time for advisors. The 
role of the advisor was discussed. It was stated that when the 
advisor is someone the students choose, and whom they know to be 
available, they will go to him. Discussion indicated the faculty 
advisor must be someone who is stimulating and thought-provoking . 

President Lederle added that a desk should be provided 
where the faculty advisor should be, so that there would be 
physical awareness of his availability. 

Chairman Lyons summarized the opinion of the committee, 
that it had been a very satisfactory and informative conference; 
that the report was excellent, and apparently there is an abundance 
of goodwill which is most important. The committee directed the 
Secretary to send copies of the Report and Recommendations of the 
University of Massachusetts' Publications Commission to all Trustees 

Dean Field entered the meeting and was asked for a brief 
summary, by Trustee Croce, of what had transpired since the lifting 
of the curfew regulation. Dean Field quickly summarized, stating 
the plans were as originally established, but implementation had 
been somewhat delayed in the search for appropriate personnel. For 
example (1) interviews began for fire and security guards on 
September 1; only three of 75 persons interviewed were considered 
right for the job. The procedure then is to send these men to 
State Police School for training. However, this matter now is well 
underway and we are fully staffed. (2) students employed as re- 
ceptionists are now fully trained... (an additional 218 names are on 
this list and also trained) . Doors are locked at 12 midnight on 
weekdays; at 1-00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. (3) six areas are 
established where students go to await the guard for escort and 
admission to their residence halls. (4.) students have set up 
Constitution - copies supplied to Student Senate. (5) every house 
has a house government and has voted for a removal of curfews. 

Dean Field estimated that about half of the houses have a 
suitable constitution in writing. The balance are working on them. 
He then introduced to the meeting Jacqueline Hall, chairman of 
women's affairs, Student Life Committee. Miss Hall described her 
experience as a residence hall receptionist from 12 to 3:00 a.m. 
She said the new curfew plan is working very well. She added the 
House Judiciaries are just beginning to work and are trying to 
coordinate with other bodies. Miss Hall feels that conduct is 
generally very much the same as when the curfew was employed in 
past years. 

Mr. Lucia, in response to the Chairman's question on how 
many students stayed out overnight, estimated that the average per 
building through the week, coming in at varied hours after midnight, 
would be a dozen, and about 25-30 on the weekend. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



2829 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Maginnis questioned the trend of inquiry, since 
the students have always been allowed the opportunity to stay out. 
Mr. Lucia commented that this is the first year the men and the 
women have had the same system. He feels it is working out just as 
well as the plan when curfews were imposed. 

President Lederle raised the question of people who stay 
out because there is not enough to do on campus and asked for a 
statement of opinion. Mr. Greenquist, president of the Student 
Senate and a Residence Hall Counselor agreed that there has been 
some request by a few students and there was proposed to be con- 
sideration of leaving the Union open later or a similar solution. 

Dean Field stated that outsiders who "drift" into dormi- 
tories are now pretty well eliminated and there is far less casual 
vandalism. Dr. Croce evinced interest in the percent of students 
failing, now that the curfew has been lifted. Dean Field indicated 
it is too early in the academic year to tell. It was the consensus 
of opinion among the faculty present that so far no apparent change 
was evident scholastically, but that lifting of the curfew has 
relaxed the traffic bottlenecks formerly occasioned by the need for 
all students to be in at the same time. Professor Varley said there 
is a big difference at Orchard Hill in the last three years. This 
fall there has been no vandalism; the whole attitude has improved. 

Dean Field and Mr. Hardy felt that much of the breakage 
reported was caused by defective or inadequate equipment; i.e. 
unprotected light bulbs, glass in unprotected areas, etc. 

Provost Tippo asked Msgr. Power for his comments. The 
chaplain stated he did not want to be the devil's advocate, but 
in spite of the foregoing reports of an apparently happy state of 
affairs, he is convinced there is need for much greater regulation, 
He described conditions of laxity in rules as reported to him, add- 
ing that he has received letters from distressed parents and is 
firmly convinced the rules are too lenient. 

There was an exchange of views, and discussion, entered 
into by Dean Field, Miss Hall, Miss White and Mr. Hardy. The sum 
of this was that (1) the lifting of curfew made very little differ- 
ence to upper classmen who had been conditioned to returning at the 
established hour and automatically continued to do so (2) liberali- 
zation eliminated "sign out" rule, but in fact the whereabouts of 
students are generally known, as before, by roommate, friends or 
surrounding classmates (3) the "stay out" problem is no more 
acute. There was always a way to arrange this, if a student wished 
to violate the rules. The student representatives seemed to feel 
the new system is quite successful, reducing tensions and encourag- 
ing maturity. 

There was further discussion as to faculty impressions on 
practical aspects of the regulations. Those present were of the 
general opinion it was working out well. The majority of students 
have responded with responsibility and a new sense of self respect 
at being treated as adults. It was stated that students who stayed 
out past the usual time generally were found to be studying together. 



2830 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The subject of enforcement of regulations, the role of 
student counselors and heads of residence in this respect was 
discussed. Miss Butler, Women's Judiciary member, stated that it 
should not be the duty of the students to impose regulations on 
students accused of stealing from local merchants, a problem now 
of paramount importance. Dean Field, for the administration, 
stated this was not and had not been considered a University en- 
forcement problem. He stated it had always been a matter for 
established processes of law in the outside community and he had 
always made this quite clear. 

Chaplain Scott was asked for his comments. He said he, 
too, had received letters from anxious parents; but this is not 
novel to this year. Chaplain Scott believes that putting the re- 
sponsibility on the students has been good. We are in a transition 
period and there will be some adjustments. He inquired if there 
could be made available a statement of philosophy under which the 
University operated in these areas to be supplied to parents and 
incoming freshmen. Perhaps the Student Government could enter into 
this. Dean Field agreed this is one of our deficiencies - a 
sufficiently clear and basic document to state what we are doing 
and what we believe. He hoped such a document could be worked out. 

Msgr. Power reasserted, in spite of the lack of support- 
ing comment from the meeting, that much was to be desired in improve- 
ment of the moral climate at the University. 

The meeting proceeded to the discussion of Security. Mr. 
Gurwitz stated the Student Senate thought security was not as tight 
as it should be and they plan to ask for an increase in night time 
police protection. Mr. Hardy concurred. 

Discussion ensued as to numbers of police on duty and 
their functions at all times. Treasurer Johnson pointed out that 
the basic campus police force is reinforced by use of radio contact 
with town police and state police. 

Deployment of the police staff was discussed; i.e. two in 
cruiser, none in office. This has been rearranged; however at all 
times there was coverage by phone or radio. 

Dean Field stated that the late night security now is 
quite good. Laxity in this department has been corrected. It is 
felt police coverage is adequate. 

The student group present was asked for comment. Mr. 
Greenquist stated a booklet outlining procedure has been awaited 
for three weeks; Dean Field agreed the delay was unfortunate. 

The degree of investigation required of student 
counselors was the subject of inquiry. Counselor White stated they 
are now trying to make the dorm feel responsible for what, before 
the new regulations, Security was responsible for. The student 
representatives present concurred that the Bill Barnard statement 
is excellent. 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



2831 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Miss Butler, Women's Judiciary representation (also 
Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority) stated that there are no more flagrant 
violations than formerly, nor are they more serious; that as a 
matter of fact the function of the Judiciary is to regulations 
guarding student safety, not their morals. The University never 
took a position on morals, just on safety; i.e. interest in late 
nights or sign out, was to insure knowledge of where student was 
for safety, not what they were doing. 

Further discussion followed on the problem of stealing 
by students. This has recently been publicized. The students felt 
the problem of stealing within the University is a matter of student 
citizenship responsibility. The University policy on shoplifting 
and stealing in general was stated by Dean Field. The University 
has assumed no responsibility for this; it does not act "in loco 
parentis" . When cases of stealing are reported to him by local 
merchants, the student is remanded to the usual recourses of the 
law. 

The meeting moved to the discussion of damage in residence 
halls. Mr. Welles gave a report of damage, both student caused (or 
suspected) and through faulty design, or equipment. His conclusion 
was that the student caused damage overall was not great and the 
whole matter had been badly exaggerated, particularly by the Boston 
press . 

It seemed to be the consensus of opinion, (faculty and 
student) that damage and vandalism were dealt with summarily, when 
identifiable, by the student judiciary. This body metes out 
punishment sternly and looks with disdain, according to Mr. Hardy, 
on student violators. This has had the effect of reducing 
destruction appreciably. 

President Lederle called for expressions of opinion on 
the general conduct of the police staff. Except for a few isolated 
instances the students (and advisors) found the police force re- 
sponsible, alert and most cooperative. 

The subject of towing of cars was introduced to the meet- 
ing. Mr. Greenquist staging that the police bore the brunt of 
this criticism for their speedy tagging and towing of improperly 
parked vehicles. President Lederle said this was his rule, and 
the police merely carried out his and the Trustees' instruction. 
He thought the students should find much satisfaction in knowing 
that the University was a place where there were "no fix" tickets. 

The procedures for securing and training police officers 
was described. 

Assistant Dean of Men Tepper spoke for better campus 
lighting. He stated there are critical needs, and he hopes they 
will receive attention. Treasurer Johnson stated that, even in 
areas where lighting is ample, there is vandalism and street lamps 
are often broken as fast as they are put in place - particularly 



2832 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



near the President's House. Dean Field said there are more vandal- 
proof lights which could and should be used in such open areas. 
Mr. Gurwitz stated that women students are really afraid at night 
to walk alone on many dark paths in various areas of the campus. 

In reference to traffic and parking violations, the sug- 
gestion, was made that the fines be increased from $8 to $10 and 
strictly enforced in lieu of a towing policy. It was suggested 
that the University might establish its own tow lot, and place the 
revenue from fines into a scholarship fund. Treasurer Johnson 
stated that this matter was governed by law. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:25 p.m. 



r 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, I Board of Trustee 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

December 7, 1966, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, University of 

Massachusetts, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle, Trustees 
Haigis and Plimpton; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 
Miss Coulter. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



of: 



Dr. Cellura, Miss Eastwood, Dean 
Hunsherger, Dean Kirshem, Dr. Mellen, 
Dean Niederpruem, Dean Picha, Dr. Reber, 
Dean Rollason, Dr. venman, Dr. Wolf, 
Professor Norton, Dr. Paulsen 

Messrs. Greenquist, Boronski, Y/ard; 
Misses Diamond and Roundy - representing 
the Fine Arts Council 



Chairman Troy opened the meeting, introducing the subject 
(1) Accreditation Report - School of Engineering. 



2833 



I 



Dean Picha joined the meeting and advised the committee 
that a letter of accreditation had been received from the Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development. He read portions of the 
letter to the meeting, indicating approbation of some aspects of 
the University Engineering Department, and suggestions for improve- 
ment of other areas. Dean Picha stated a committee has been set up 
to look at these things. 

Dean Picha briefly summarized the content of the report 
as it referred to each department, adding his personal observations. 

In response to Trustee Plimpton's inquiry, Dean Picha 
stated the net result of the survey and report was the Engineering 
School has received accreditation for 6 years for Civil Engineering, 
Chemical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Electrical Engineering 
and accreditation for 4- years for Mechanical Engineering. 

Dean Picha left the meeting. 

Provost Tippo introduced the subject of (2) Sabbatical 
Leave Requests. There was circulated to the members a listing of 
faculty members whose requests for sabbatical leaves were recommended 
After discussion of the merits of the various requests, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the list of faculty members 
recommended for sabbatical leaves for 1967-68 
as amended and attached herewith. (Document 67-035) 



Accreditation 
Report - 
School of 
Engineering 



Sabbatical 

Leave 

Requests 



2834 



Chair in 
Ma thematic £ 



COMMITTEE 



Library 
Petition 



Freiburg 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy introduced the subject of: (3) Chair in 
Mathematics . 

Provost Tippo submitted the recommendation that the title 
of GEORGE DAVID BIRKHOFF PROFESSORSHIP IN MATHEMATICS be assigned 
to a Chair in Mathematics expected to be occupied by an inter- 
nationally renowned mathematician. 

Provost Tippo indicated that the late George David 
Birkhoff was one of the most distinguished mathematicians America 
has produced. He was a member of the National Academy. Motion 
was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they establish the GEORGE DAVID BIRKHOFF 
PROFESSORSHIP IN MATHEMATICS. 

The meeting then advanced to the discussion of : (4) 
Library Petition. 

Provost Tippo advised the committee that the first hearing 
had been held in Springfield Court and the petition of the Uni- 
versity Librarian had now been amended by the Plaintiff's counsel, 
to include the Board of Trustees. This procedure will create a 
delay in disposition of the case. 

Provost Tippo read a proposed letter of response to a 
communication received from Mr. Morrison C. Haviland of the Goodell 
Library. Discussion and suggestions ensued. It was agreed to 
dispatch this letter which in essence reaffirms the procedure 
followed by the administration of protecting the interests of the 
staff, and encouraging the submission of suggestions as to how this 
can be improved, channeling such recommendations through the 
Trustees . 



r 



letter . 



The Secretary was authorized to send the aforementioned 



Dean Hunsberger and Dean Rollason and Professor Paulsen 
entered the meeting. The meeting proceeded to the discussion of: 
(5) Freiburg Program. 

Dean Rollason spoke for the committee, seeking authoriza- 
tion to continue the Program. A memorandum entitled AUTHORIZATION 
TO CONTINUE THE ATLANTIC STUDIES CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
FREIBURG, GERMANY, AND REQUEST FOR FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR 1967-68 
was distributed. 

This program has been in effect for only a few months, 
but it is suggested it be continued for another year and that the 
number of students allowed to participate be increased from 35 to 
50 and University support be increased to $30,000. 



I 



2835 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion which revealed that out of the 35 
students now participating, only one is questionable. Chairman 
Troy stated that this was a very impressive record. 

There was discussion of alumni support of this program. 
Professor Rollason stated he would pursue this, once he had Trustee 
approval to proceed for the next year. He is hopeful the financial 
support will continue as previously. 

There were questions, discussion as to proposed increase 
in numbers of students and funds allocated. It was the feeling of 
the meeting it would be desirable to wait until a full year's ex- 
perience had been available, in order to evaluate the possibilities 
of the recommendation. 

Further discussion encompassed the student participation 
fee, the cost to the University of this program, as compared to 
Bologna, etc. Treasurer Johnson stated this program is comparative- 
ly highly subsidized and brought up the matter of waived fees. The 
Trustees expressed strong reaction to this and stated the partici- 
pation fee should never be waived. Treasurer Johnson was instructed 
to regularize this item. 

Motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
continue the Atlantic Studies Center 
Program at the same financial level for 
1967-68, with the provision that the 
Student Participation Fee be increased 
from $20 to $50. 

The meeting then advanced to the discussion of the next 
agenda item: (6) Fine Arts Fee. 

Professor Norton and representatives of the Fine Arts 
Council entered the meeting. Copies of the Constitution of the 
Fine Arts Council, Document 67-038 were distributed to the Trustees. 

John Greenquist, president of the Student Senate, 
addressed the meeting on behalf of this proposal. 

President Greenquist stated that for some years there has 
been a proposal to do something for Fine Arts. As yet this has not 
been accomplished. The attached Constitution is the result of series 
of conferences and meetings and has been approved by the Student and 
Faculty Senates. Mr. Greenquist summarized the effect of this plan 
as establishing a "fee", instead of a student tax. The fee would 
not exceed four dollars per semester. The purpose of today's meet- 
ing with the committee is to secure approval of the Constitution as 
submitted . 

Provost Tippo stated that a meeting had been held with his 
office, and revisions noted on the constitution were the result. 



Fine Arts 
Fee 



2836 



COMMITTEE 



New Courses 
and Programs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to discussion and inquiry, Mr. Greenquist 
stated a budget would be prepared and submitted to the Trustees 
for approval, at which time the fee would be set. This, however, 
should follow approval of a constitution by the Trustees. 

President Lederle expressed the hope that the Council 
would operate within the sum previously spent. He noted recent 
advances in costs for students in the areas of room and board and 
expressed concern that the Fine Arts Council would stay within 
previously established budgets. 

Professor Norton stated the Fine Arts Council cannot grow 
and expand without an increase in budget. 

President Lederle said the purpose here today is to con- 
sider approval of the Constitution herewith submitted. The matter 
of the budget will be a subject for future conference and review. 
Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the Constitution of the Fine 
Arts Council, (Document 67-038), which is 
attached hereto. 

In response to Trustee Plimpton's inquiry, Mr. Greenquist 
stated he felt the Student Senate would not disapprove of any 
editorial changes made in the document which were made in the inter- 
est of clarification. 

Professor Norton inquired if it would be possible, on 
plans for '67, to proceed without budget approval on the premise 
that a budget will be approved later. President Lederle felt that 
it would be reasonable to assume that plans could be made along the 
lines of those followed in preceding years. The group agreed to 
make an effort to get the budget into the hands of the Trustee com- 
mittee promptly. 

Thaes were distributed to the committee copies of material 
prepared pertinent to agenda item 7: New Courses and Programs. 

Dean Kirshen, Professor Wolf and Professor Mellen entered 
the meeting. Dean Kirshen spoke in support of adding new courses 
and revising the undergraduate curriculum in marketing. 

There was discussion as to the field encompassed, the 
national trend in these areas and question as to any resultant in- 
crease in cost to the University. 

Dean Kirshen described the proposed revisions in program 
and the new courses. He stated there would be no increase in 
expense beyond that which would inevitably be necessary in an 
expanding department. 



r 



I 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the new programs and new courses as 
described on attached memorandum dated 
November 29, 1966, Document 67-039, be approved, 
document is herewith attached. 



This 



Dean Marion A. Niederpruem, School of Home Economics, 
Winifred Eastwood, Head Extension Division, A. Raymond Cellura, 
Human Development and Elwood F. Reber, Nutrition and Food, joined 
the meeting. 

A memorandum was distributed relative to agenda item: 
(8) Departments in Home Economics. 

Dean Niederpruem read the content of the memorandum as 
distributed, requesting formalized approval for the areas in Home 
Economics proposed for establishment as departments. One of the 
advantages outlined was that the graduates may be identified with 
their major areas of specialization. At present all graduates re- 
ceive their degrees simply in Home Economics. Departmentalization 
will solve this problem. 

There was discussion on certain fields included in the 
School of Home Economics, with particular reference to Human 
Development. Mr. Cellura responded to this by explaining the 
concept of human development as an academic discipline. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following areas be established as de- 
partment heads in the School of Home 
Economics : 

Nutrition and Food 

Home Economics Education 

Human Development 

Management and Family Economics 

Textiles, Clothing and Environmental Arts 



The meeting was adjourned 




Rob 
Secretary 






'J. McCartney 
oard of Truste 



283? 



Departments 
in Home 
Economics 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 
Discussion; 
Review of 
Plans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Minutes of Meeting of Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
December 13, 1966, 10:00 a.m., Southwest Dining Commons, Amherst 



PRESENT: Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Croce, Crowley, 
Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis, Plimpton, 
McNamara; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter, Secretary McCartney, Miss 
Coulter. 



I 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Austin Broadhurst, Ely, Bartlett, 
Brown & Proctor; Leslie M. Greig, 
Plant Engineer, UMass Medical School; 
Messrs. Chase & Gediman of BBC; 
Peter Moyes of Ritchie Associates; 
Messrs. Aldrich $ Quinlan of Campbell, 
Aldrich & Nulty; Charles E. Shepard, 
Deputy Commissioner for Fiscal Affairs; 
Walter O'Connell, Deputy Commissioner 
of Administration & Finance; D. H. 
Ramseth of Ellerbe Architects; Harry 
Hug ill, Director of Physical Plant; 
Dean Redfern and Planning Officer 
Littlefield. 



The Chairman introduced Dean Soutter to the meeting to 
review the preliminary plans, cost estimates and current status on 
application for federal matching funds for the Medical School. 
Dean Soutter supplied those in attendance with a listing of "Com- 
parison of Costs Before and After Architects' Revision" (see 
attached). He summarized the activities of his group in securing 
comparisons with other schools, of costs, space utilization, space 
needs. The architects were asked to reduce their costs of October 
25, 1966 which they have done by eliminating space. Mr. Nelson 
Aldrich entered the meeting and stated the figures had been 
analyzed, considered, reconstructed and now represented in their 
revised state a realistic picture of today's construction of the 
Medical School. 

A set of blueprints was examined by the committee. It 
was emphasized that these plans are for the Medical Science Build- 
ing and do not include the hospital, garage or auditorium. It was 
further clarified that cost reductions over original estimates were 
effected by reducing space allocations of some areas. Otherwise, 
the plans are similar with the original design layout. 

Dean Soutter described the planned building as compared 
with the University of Connecticut building now under construction, 
both in size and costs. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Walter O'Connell, Deputy Commissioner of Administra- 
tion and Finance, requested clarification on the exclusion of the 
auditorium from the revised plans. Mr. Moyes of Ritchie Associates 
explained that the revisions do not, at this time, in deference to 
costs, include the auditorium, parking garage or any further land- 
scaping. These will be added when the hospital is built. 

Mr. Shepard, Deputy Commissioner for Fiscal Affairs, 
stated that consideration of these matters should be made now as 
they are involved with total funding problems and bond issues. 
It is important that all the costs be anticipated at this time. 

Dean Soutter gave the approximate schedule. Construction 
will start in the spring of 1968. The basic science building will 
be completed by 1970. The hospital will be started in the spring 
of 1969 and completed in the spring of 1971. The expenditure of 
appropriations would be spread over 1969-70-71. 

There was discussion between Commissioner Shepard and Deaji 
Soutter as to the timing of submission of the budget to the Legis- 
lature. The need to include all anticipated expenditures was con- 
sidered; also, whether the cost of the full plan should be sub- 
mitted at one time or piecemeal as the program progressed. 

Commissioner Shepard requested to be informed as soon as 
possible of a reasonable estimate of what the share of Federal 
matching funds will be. He explained the need for this as it 
affects the state's borrowing procedure in such matters. The 
federal share is not bonded. It is, therefore, imperative that 
early determination be made of what this share is likely to be. 

Dean Soutter estimated that 50% of the medical science 
building would come from the Federal government. The hospital is 
entirely an educational facility. This project, therefore, might 
expect matching funds as high as two- thirds of cost. This cannot 
be accurately predicted, however. The garage is a question; some- 
times such facilities are aided, sometimes not. 

Dean Soutter was optimistic that Federal funds would be 
available. After he and his associates go to Washington next 
Friday, they will be in a better position to predict *t ne scope of 
assistance. 

Dr. Croce commented that one of the reasons for breaking 
up the anticipated costs into two grants over two fiscal years is 
that it seems more likely we will receive favorable consideration 
in this way. Dean Soutter concurred. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that the original reason for 
splitting construction into two phases had nothing to do with 
funding. It was purely a matter of getting the school project 
underway so that students could be admitted in 1970. 



283.9 



2840 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Commissioner Shepard said what is of greatest interest 
from the financial point of view is that the Medical School is a 
major commitment of the Commonwealth. But the state, up to now, 
has not been geared to raising this sort of money. The Commissioner 
felt it would no doubt be a matter of some interest to the Governor 
in preparing his inaugural address to be able to make reference to 
this major step forward. He hoped that sufficient information would 
be made available in time for this purpose. 

Mr. Chase of the Bureau of Building Construction joined 
the meeting. 

Mr. O'Connell inquired whether there have been any recent 
Federal decisions or any other medical schools from which we could 
draw a comparison as to probable outcome of our request. Dean 
Soutter expressed confidence that our request would be considered 
favorably in view of other recent grants. 



meeting. 



Dean Redfern and Attorney Austin Broadhurst joined the 



I 



Commissioner Shepard inquired if there had been a change 
in the Federal attitude toward aid to medical schools in the last 
two or three years. Dean Soutter felt that, in the light of their 
experience, the Federal agency had assumed a less flexible attitude 
toward research, requiring definite schedules. There is, however, 
a possible lightening up of restriction in the area of school grants 
When pressed for a date by Commissioner Shepard, Dean Soutter said 
he felt we should know the Federal position in relation to our re- 
quest for funds by the end of July, 1967. 

Treasurer Johnson suggested recommending an additional 
appropriation based on the need as evidenced by these cost figures 
for design and land acquisition so that there will be further 
evidence for Federal authorities that the Commonwealth is committed 
There was further comment as to the need for a purposeful pre- 
sentation, adequately supported by plans and figures. 

Commissioner Shepard responded to Mr. O'Connell's inquiry 
as to how much expense was involved, by stating everyone has 
realized for some time that costs will be in the neighborhood of 
$45-50 million and that this would not prove startling. He then 
inquired whether student residence facilities were provided in the 
estimate. It was pointed out that they were not, due to a variety 
of factors, including (l) first priority on educational buildings, 
and (2) no immediate need due to limited number of students. 
Commissioner Shepard said he wished to be certain in working this 
matter out that residence facilities will not represent a delayed 
cost. If this has to be financed by bond issue, it should be known 
now, rather than later. 

Chairman Haigis said it was difficult to predict the 
future scope of expansion. 



I 



[ 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Commissioner Shepard agreed that future expansion of 
facilities was understandably uncertain to predict, but, insofar 
as present plans are concerned, we should "have an outline of the 
full package." 

Treasurer Johnson said the original projections in- 
cluded housing. In the interests of timing and first things first, 
however, the focus now is on the school and hospital. Chairman 
Haigis and Mr. Shepard strongly urged that the complete plan for 
development of the Medical School and hospital be submitted at 
this time. 

Mr. Chase stated the garage represented a substantial 
amount, about $2 million, and asked if the Commonwealth would be 
expected to finance this. Dean Soutter replied that there are 
different ways this can be done. Suggestions included Federal 
support or financing through the University Building Authority. 
It became evident that there should be some clear separation of 
responsibility for projects, so that there would not be duplication 
of effort. 

Mr. Shepard said that although the Medical School is of 
prime interest and concern, it is, in fact, only part of the en- 
tire problem his department faces state-wide. The best advice 
available to look anew at the general problems of finance and 
capital outlay is imperative, including the considerable expense 
of the Medical School. Mr. Shepard expressed the hope that, within 
the next four weeks, at least a tentative capital outlay program 
could be brought together. This should include all anticipated 
expenditures so that professional advice could be sought. Chair- 
man Haigis extended assurance of the committee ' s cognizance of and 
concern with this problem. 

Mr. Shepard hoped that proper data will be supplied to 
the Governor's office without delay. This should include a resume 
of where the matter now stands, so that information may be in- 
cluded in the inaugural message. These data are needed also for 
the Budget office in preparing the total capital outlay program. 

Treasurer Johnson stated the action needed now is 
authorization to proceed in discussions with Federal agencies 
leading up to a presentation to the Governor and the Legislature 
of revised cost figures on the Medical School. Motion was there- 
upon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that there be and hereby is authorized 
the preparation and filing of an appli- 
cation for Federal assistance for the 
construction of medical science facilities 
for the Medical School on the basis of the 
plans and cost estimates dated December 2, 
1966 presented to this meeting and that 
Lamar Soutter, Dean of the Medical School, 



2841 



2842 



COMMITTEE 



UM Building 
Authority 
Enabling Act 
Amendment 



University 
College 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be and he hereby is authorized to take all 
such action including but not limited to 
execution of such application as he may 
deem necessary in connection with the 
preparation, filing and prosecution of such 
application. 

Mr. Austin Broadhurst was recognized. He introduced the 
subject of an amendment to the enabling act creating the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority. This amendment would facili- 
tate the University college project and other projects undertaken 
by the Building Authority by making it possible, when requested and 
authorized by the Trustees, for the State to pay for incidental 
academic space or utilities built into residence halls or other 
self-liquidating projects. This might be done by the State turning 
over appropriations as authorized to the Authority to pay the cost 
of construction or the space might be leased by the State at an 
appropriate rental. These would be options available to the State 
and the Trustees and could be used only where the academic space or 
utilities were clearly incidental to the project. It could not be 
used to construct an entire academic building. In this way, stu- 
dent room rents or fees would not be used to pay for academic space. 
In response to a request for clarification of purpose by Mr. Chase, 
Mr. Broadhurst explained that the amendment would expedite and 
simplify the bringing of utilities to Authority projects. 

President Lederle asked Provost Tippo to talk about the 
concept of "University College". Provost Tippo described the ex- 
perimentation with this program at Orchard Hill. He outlined the 
plans for future expansion of the concept, including the incorpora- 
tion of some degree of instructional space directly into the 
residence units. 

Mr. Shepard raised the question of financing and charges 
for living costs involved. He reminded the meeting of the diffi- 
culty of financing new facilities at anywhere near a reasonable 
figure compared to cost structures in past years. This is true 
throughout the entire state budget. We must take into account, he 
said, the relationships between State constructed facilities and 
Authority constructed facilities. They cannot be entirely separate. 
We must focus on the most economical way of financing these 
projects. He said it may be that what is here suggested is not 
only feasible but economical. However, it should be approached on 
the basis of cost and not just desirability of getting the work 
done. We need a real factual analysis on whether it is cheaper for 
the Authority to construct such facilities or the Commonwealth. 
This requires study. Mr. O'Connell concurred. 

Mr. Broadhurst explained that all that is intended is to 
expand the range of options available on both sides. The con- 
templated legislation, if enacted, would simply offer a wider range 
of options by which to fund and construct certain projects. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson said that the educational values to 
the student outweigh any financing problems. In response to 
Mr. O'Connell's query as to the timetable with respect to creation 
of the University College, the Treasurer stated the plans are one 
year behind now just because of this problem of "how to finance". 
He described future building plans and costs. Mr. Shepard discusse|d 
the financing aspects as it concerned the state in view of the 
advancing interest costs. Mr. Broadhurst drew a comparison of the 
State rate of interest on bond purchase and the Authority rate; 
comparing also the costs of counsel and other expenses borne by 
the Authority and not the State. He pointed out that the Authority 
had just rejected a bid on bonds at 4.125 as too high as compared 
to the State's recent sale of bonds at 4.25. 

Trustee Maginnis inquired what the next step would be. 
Mr. Broadhurst stated that the committee and the Board should con- 
sider whether, in their judgment, the legislation as proposed is 
advisable from the University point of view and, if it is, 
recommend to the Governor jointly with the State College and 
Technical Institute Trustees a special message to the Legislature, 
The Governor and his staff can then decide whether, on the basis 
of these recommendations and their own examination, this is some- 
thing they wish to recommend as an appropriate matter for public 
policy. Copies of the proposal were then distributed. 

Chairman Haigis moved the meeting to the discussion of 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

Chancellor Ryan stated, in view of the advancement of 
time, that he would let his remarks go over until the meeting 
about to follow. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 




Robert 3". McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trus 

u 



2843 



UM/Boston 

Discussion 

Deferred 



2844 



COMMITTEE 



Long-Range 
Master Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 5, 1967, 10:00 a.m., Chancellor Ryan's Office, Boston 

• PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Haigis, Lyons, 
Pumphret, Troy; Chancellor Ryan, 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney, Dean Redfern, 
Miss Coulter. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean Gagnon; Messrs. Cope, 
Castelpoggi, Littlefield. 



Chairman Healey stated that the purpose of the meeting is 
primarily to review a preliminary outline of the Master Plan. 

President Lederle said the master plans of other uni- 
versities are predominantly public relations documents. He felt 
that ours could be cut down to 30 or 40 pages, after agreement as 
to the trend it should take. 

The President stated the enrollment projection un- 
doubtedly is of primary interest. Assuming the current ratio of 
students to teachers and supporting staff, personnel needs can be 
projected and given certain assumptions of classroom, library, and 
other space per student, capital outlay needs can be projected. 

Dean Redfern outlined the master plan format, emphasizing 
it is not intended as a rigid blueprint. He explained that the 
material supplied to the committee was developed as a staff problem, 
It was not based on a general University- wide study. 

There was discussion as to whether this was in fact a 
"long-range plan" as titled, or an immediate plan. Trustee Pumphret 
expressed the view that the plan in fact required immediate con- 
sideration of the costs involved in any projections, and avail- 
ability of funds for implementation of future plans. He stated he 
did not feel it to be practical to consider this ten-year forecast 
until due consideration was given to whether sufficient money will 
be available at the state level. 

The President emphasized that the role of the Trustees is 
to take the lead; it is incumbent on them to point out what they 
think ought to be done. 

Trustee Pumphret made reference to a magazine article 
describing the University of Pittsburgh plight. This gave rise to 
the question: at what point should Trustees enter into the area of 
planning? What is policy and what is administrative detail? What 
is desirable from the administrative viewpoint? Finally, what is 



f 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a workable solution? Questions were raised as to what areas 
should concern the Trustees; when should a ceiling be put on 
numbers of students on a particular campus; where does the money 
come from. 

Chairman Healey summarized the basic problems: 

(1) The need for projecting operational budgets - 
5 years in advance - to continue programs 
already in effect. 

(2) The general need to look at a longer span - 
perhaps 10 years. This would envision new 
long-range programs. 

Chairman Healey stated a vacuum exists in this area. 
The new Board of Higher Education will be looking to the University 
for leadership. Once plans have been formulated, problems out- 
lined, and costs projected, the facts should be presented to the 
public and the legislature so they will know the dimensions of the 
problem for the future. Mr. Healey said if people appreciate there 
is a problem and are told the facts and implications, he has con- 
fidence they will assume the responsibility. 

Trustee Troy felt the question of size was an important 
consideration. This involves how large a campus could get as well 
as how big it should get and still be good. He related this to 
Amherst and Boston as well as any future campuses. One question 
is whether to resist growth beyond a certain point or encourage it 

President Lederle indicated that by encouraging develop- 
ment of community colleges, as we do, the effect is to limit the 
University growth to some extent. 

Chairman Healey felt it to be the responsibility of the 
administration to set the pattern for the future role in the long- 
range plan. He stated he did not share Trustee Pumphret's concern 
over allocation of funds. The immediate primary concern of the 
Trustees is the University and its plans for the future. 

President Lederle said he was absolutely convinced, and 
hoped the Trustees would be as well, that there is no present 
danger that there is "over-building" in Amherst. The prospective 
students are born. Statistics are available to prove it in the 
material at hand. Nor is there conflict envisioned between appro- 
priate growth of the University in Boston and plans for growth in 
Amherst. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that his department had 
started to cost the program, but since it is subject to deletion 
and change, he felt it wiser to await the completed program and 
then proceed with the costing. 



2845 



2846 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Caste lpoggi, at the invitation of Dean Redfern, then 
expanded on the source material previously supplied to the 
Trustees, titled Enrollment Projections. He also described the 
implications of the figures in planning document titled Enrollment 
and Organization Guidelines for Long-Range University Planning 
1966-76. 

Among other things, the figures indicate that, on a per- 
centage basis, the public schools in Massachusetts are increasing 
enrollment at a greater rate than the national average. Mr. 
Caste lpoggi drew attention to the table showing an increase in 
total graduates as well as a total demand for education - effecting 
a double increase in advanced education need. 

Successive tables were discussed indicating among other 
things that there will be another rush of college-age youth in 
this country between the years 1972-78. It was observed that 
Massachusetts ranks ninth in total number of resident undergraduate 
students, and eighth among the states with the highest number of 
resident undergraduates going out of state for this education 
opportunity. 

Trustee Lyons noted that the projections, especially 
Table XIII, now indicate that the turn is toward public institutions 

President Lederle expressed interest in whether Harvard 
and other private university enrollment is continuing to decrease 
in terms of intake of Massachusetts students. He hoped the Board 
of Education, of which Mr. Healey is a member, could supply this 
information. 

Discussion moved to another planning document, "Analysis 
of Campus Enrollment Growth for Long-Range University Planning." 
Special notice was taken of the anticipated enrollment increase of 
57% in the year 1976. 

Question was raised as to the relatively constant figure 
of Stockbridge School. The President stated this school is 
probably the best of its kind in the country and serves a very 
distinct need. 

Trustee Pumphret felt consideration should be given to 
curtailment of enrollment at Boston until a permanent site is 
definitely established. 

Chairman Healey asked for a breakdown of figures showing 
size of entering classes and projected attrition, transfers, etc.; 
also where the transfers are from; also what the anticipated en- 
rollments will be in the graduate program. 

Chancellor Ryan stated a great deal of support would be 
necessary in order to achieve the enrollment projections shown for 
UM at Boston for the next ten years. He advised the committee that 
a proposal for rental of 170,000 square feet of space will be 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

presented to the Board at a later meeting. More space is needed 
to provide at least the amenities of a collegiate atmosphere. 

Tables II and III were discussed. It was noted that in 
1973 enrollment will be the same percent of the population as in 
I960. Chairman Healey commented that this also is a policy- 
question that should be decided: whether 37.7% is the ultimate 
figure . 

There was discussion of Table IV as related to the enroll 
ment projection of transfer students. The President recited the 
current policy, stating that transfers from community colleges in 
1966-67 will approximate 650 to Amherst and Boston. In ten years 
this will grow to 2,700. These figures were compared with other 
colleges throughout the nation. It was emphasized that junior 
colleges and community colleges are needed to take up the great 
demand for education at higher levels. 

Chairman Healey stated a policy should be established as 
to what percentage of transfers the University should admit. 

President Lederle noted that the University of 
California will take entering freshmen only from the upper 12|$ of 
high school graduates; State Colleges from the upper third of high 
school graduates. The balance of students go to community 
colleges. He questioned v/hether, at this stage, the University of 
Massachusetts should have any formula of this sort. The President 
would like the University to maintain flexibility so that it might 
experiment with programs for admitting risk cases who do not con- 
form to the standardized College Board and standing in high school 
class criteria. 

Mr. Castelpoggi completed the presentation prepared by 
the OIS with comment on Table V, the enrollment projection for 
Continuing Education. 

Dean Redfern solicited review and comment of the fore- 
going figures from the committee members. He urged that they in- 
form the administration concerning any special breakdowns of 
statistics, adjustments in what has been presented, or special 
targets desired, for example: 

(1) optimum size of campus 

(2) percentage intake among community 
college transfer students - as a 
whole in the state 

There was further discussion as to optimum size. There 
were views that this question should be considered in terms of the 
probable funds available. Other comments suggested it should be 
solved with consideration for the student clamoring for education, 
without particular regard at this time for possible future budgets 



284^ 



r?* 



2848 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey said we should determine the following for 
the University: 

1. What is its role? 

2. How to implement it? 

Then the following should occur: 

1. The administration should then decide how to 
accomplish the stated goals. 

2. The Trustees ahould go to the public and ad- 
vise them of the need. 

Trustee Pumphret felt a concise statement should be made 
by the committee on: 

1. The scope of growth 

2. Price tag 

Dean Redfern said a table showing past trends of state 
support in summary would be helpful. The discussion continued with 
comparisons of other colleges and universities with rapid growth 
patterns . 



A basic philosophy for University growth v/as outlined 



as: 



1. We should continue a strong tradition of 
a full undergraduate program. 

2. We should not enroll only geniuses. There 
should be some leavening with middle range 
students . 

3. We should affirm that we believe in the 
concept of non-resident reciprocity as 
between states. 

Suggestions were pro ffered as to areas in which further 
data and information would be helpful: 

1. Into what fields do incoming students transfer? 

2. How much duplication of programming could be 
avoided by working with other colleges? 

3. Should we consider subsidization of certain 
programs at neighboring institutions, rather 
than establish such programs on our own? 



I 



II 



COMMITTEE 



II 



J 



2849 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Healey felt the administration should provide 
the Trustees with breakdowns on programs which it feels ought to 
be carried on by the University within the concept of its role. 
This should be a rather complete disclosure which would outline 
for the people of the Commonwealth what is required if they want 
the University to do a good job. 

Wide discussion continued on the size of the campus, 
present and future. Treasurer Johnson stated the density on which 
it is being built is on a premise of 30,000 students in Amherst, 
though it would be possible to enlarge even further. 

The President and Provost concurred that no one as yet 
has been able to say what is the optimum size of a campus. The 
Treasurer pointed out that the limiting factor in our case may 
well be simple things such as parking; how dense the campus can be 
built; problems of geography in terms of site. At this time the 
Board has a free choice to make a determination at any figure over 
20,000 (to which it is now committed). Adding University College 
will bring enrollment to 2-4,800. 

Chairman Healey reiterated the fundamental questions he 
would like to have answered: 

Should we get larger in Amherst? 

Should we place the students in Boston? 

Should we add undergraduate students in Worcester? 

What about still other campuses in the future? 

Treasurer Johnson felt consideration should also be 
given to what are the requirements of a great university? 
Specifically he felt we should not even consider shutting off 
Amherst growth until major physical plant items now in the planning 
stages are a reality; the library, the fine arts center, the 
graduate research center, etc. Chairman Healey concurred. He 
also added provision should be made for the addition of a law 
school. But this should be done later when judgment can be made 
as to where" the job can best be done. 

Trustee Pumphret felt a true long-range plan should in- 
clude further growth in Worcester, even to the extent of the Medi- 
cal Center. 

Chancellor Ryan reported the ten-year forecast for 
Boston is in the process of preparation by his staff and should be 
ready by May. In the meantime the site location for the campus is 
still unresolved. a^t^aj^sexiajKxI&HteMji^^ 
:&fa3e^x2£^axse^^ 

^fekdecedsx In view of late developments, the Chancellor feels the 
Trustees may have to start all over again. Locations such as 
Thompsons' Island and Wollaston Golf Club will be reconsidered, as 
well as others. 



2850 



COMMITTEE 



Revised 
Honorary 
Degree 
Procedure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson commented that Sasaki is, among other 
sites, looking at a Back Bay area previously mentioned. He indi- 
cated that air rights might be obtained over the turnpike in the 
vicinity of the Prudential Building. A continuing search is 
actively in process. 

Trustee Pumphret held it imperative that a program be 
presented to the Legislature with all possible haste. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that, in the interests of 
economy, it is hoped to rent for UM at Boston additional space. 
The space already equipped will be maintained in its present form, 
eliminating the need for equipping subsequently acquired buildings 
with science facilities. He stated he had specific reference to 
research and laboratory equipped space. 

University of Massachusetts at Boston now seeks three build- 
ings which will take care of their normal 1968-69 needs. Chancellor 
Ryan described the various available spaces and proposed uses. He 
set forth the anticipated enrollment at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Boston (see attached) and the resultant need for space 
(see attached). Chancellor Ryan affirmed this would provide 
laboratories for necessary research as well as instruction, class- 
rooms, lecture halls, library, faculty offices, and study spaces. 
He noted, however, this space still does not allow room for a 
faculty lounge or provide for general recreational purposes. It 
does provide academic space for 3,600 students. Acquisition of 
this space would permit search for a permanent site without delay. 

President Lederle introduced the final matter on the 
agenda: Revised Honorary Degree Procedure. There was discussion 
as to the present formula in selection of names, the opportunity to 
support or object to a nomination, and the need for an earlier 
preparation in order to better guarantee a favorable response from 
the proposed candidate. It was the sense of the meeting that these 
changes should be approved. 

The President will research any questions extant and 
bring this matter back for formal vote at the next meeting of the 
Board of Trustees. 

President Lederle proposed a study of the need for a 
dental school. This met with agreement from the Executive Committee 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary,,' Board of Trustees 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
January 11, 1967, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Crowley, Emerson, 
Maginnis, Thompson; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Dean Redfern, 
Secretary McCartney, Miss Coulter. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Mr. Richard Galehouse of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates; Mr. 
Merwin H. Rubin, Dean Picha, 
Planning Officer Littlefield. 

Chairman Haigis opened the meeting and asked Treasurer 
Johnson to briefly summarize to the committee the background of 
the matter about to be introduced in person by Mr. Rubin. 
Treasurer Johnson then drew the attention of the Trustees to a map, 
indicating the area in which Mr. Rubin is hopeful of constructing 
apartments. (See B & G minutes of May 7, 1965, P. 2620; May 28, 
1965, P. 2625; December 6, 1965, P. 2671; November 10', 1966, 
P. 2818; also Trustee minutes of May 7, 1965, P. 2708) There was 
discussion as to other possible areas for Mr. Rubin's planned de- 
velopment. Treasurer Johnson explained that Mr. Rubin is an 
alumnus of this University and feels that, in addition to a busi- 
ness venture, this project would fill a great need of additional 
housing for University people. 

Mr. Rubin has taken all the necessary preliminary steps 
to acquire the land, options, discussions with selectmen and now 
has a petition before the selectmen in Hadley to have the property 
rezoned. He proposes building 600 apartments. This is the same 
property he originally proposed to acquire for student housing 
(Fraternity Park - see page 2620). Treasurer Johnson described 
the land itself as scrub farm acreage located in the Town of 
Hadley. It cannot be supplied with sewer and water conveniences 
from Hadley as it is cut off by Route 116. The Town of Amherst 
has not been favorable to the proposal of permitting access. 
Mr. Rubin, at this point, feels he has a solution for installation 
of a sewer system. 

Mr. Galehouse gave the opinion that this land is the 
last remaining open-ended sector of the campus and he recommended 
it be held. 

Treasurer Johnson said he had considered the possibility 
of suggesting that Mr. Rubin relocate his plans to another area, 
possibly at or near the Presidential apartments. 



2851 



Rubin 
Proposal 



<gOO^ 



COMMITTEE 



Sheldon, 
Ostrowski & 
Jekanowski 
Property 



Adams 
Property 



Married 
Student 
Housing 



UM at Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Merwin H. Rubin was asked to enter the meeting. He 
brought with him schematic drawings of his proposed development 
and displayed them during the course of his request for considera- 
tion. He said, starting two years ago, that he had initiated plans 
for a large scale development bordered by Route 116 in Hadley. He 
wished to determine whether the Trustees would be willing to re- 
linquish their interest in the property. His housing market would 
be directed primarily to married students. He noted that an equi- 
valent acreage (30 + acres) in the Adams tract would be acceptable 
to him in the nature of an exchange. Mr. Rubin does not have title 
to the land, but does have options. Our adjoining land has sewers, 
the property in question does not. Mr. Rubin left the meeting. 
Planning Officer Littlefield's opinion viras one of extreme re- 
luctance to see the release of this land even though not contiguous; 
it could well be needed later. 

Chairman Haigis asked for an expression on the part of 
the committee and after motion was made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they reaffirm their position of 
acquiring the property in Hadley at 
the northwest corner of the campus in- 
cluding the Sheldon, Ostrowski and 
Jekanowski property and others. 

There was further discussion, and after motion was made, 
and seconded, it was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
to retain the Adams Farm property now 
owned by the University and to deny 
petitioner's request to acquire it. 

President Lederle introduced discussion concerning housing 
for married students, graduate students, etc. The President said 
he has had many and frequent inquiries on this subject. There have 
been two studies made (by Messrs. Moore and Welles) both of which 
say we should move rapidly into this program. The President said 
the students would like subsidized housing but that this is im- 
possible with self-liquidating buildings. The matter is under con- 
tinuing study. 

Dean Picha brought to the meeting a proposal for a 
project with a federal agency which met with unanimous approval. 
This will have further discussion. 

Chairman Haigis introduced the next agenda item, Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Boston Site. 



Mr. Galehouse of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
addressed the committee, reviewing the Boston site quest. He 
that his firm is rechecking various sites. Mr. Galehouse en- 
couraged further consultation with the city for further 



statec. 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

clarification of views and possibilities of inner city location, 
possibly involving fewer acres and greater building density. 

Chairman Haigis expressed the hope that by February we 
should have a definite site location determined in Boston. There 
was general agreement that it would be inadvisable for the faculty 
or other groups to attempt, in the meantime, to explore this 
matter further at the neighborhood level. The Secretary has been 
directed to answer this letter indicating the committee's appre- 
ciation of the concern of the faculty and assuring them that the 
committee is doing everything possible but, of necessity, this 
matter requires a great deal of careful review and investigation. 

Treasurer Johnson next reported on temporary rental 
space for the University of Massachusetts in Boston. It is the 
philosophy, he stated, to have the owner keep the building in re- 
pair as the University will expend State money for renovations 
only for laboratories in the building we presently own. Other 
buildings which are rented should be maintained by the landlords. 
At the next Buildings & Grounds Committee meeting, Treasurer 
Johnson expects to have a consultant's report to show what the 
financial needs will be. 

President Lederle stressed the need for early action to 
alleviate any possible hardship to faculty and students. 

The newly created designer selection board has before it 
the $200,000 capital appropriation item for master planning and de- 
sign of the Boston site. The President has asked them to defer 
action until the Trustees select a site and recommend architects to 
them and the Commissioner of Administration. The Chairman of the 
Board has replied welcoming recommendations from the Trustees. 
The deferment of the appointment, however, must go to the 
Commissioner of Administration. Motion was made and seconded, and 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to Commissioner DeFalco the 
deferment of action by the Designer Se- 
lection Board of project U67-4- plans for 
University of Massachusetts in Boston 
until the Trustees of the University are 
in a position to make a recommendation. 

The next item on the agenda, Parking Garage, was intro- 
duced by Chairman Haigis. Mr. Galehouse explained the project, re- 
lating it to sketches displayed for the Trustees. He referred to 
Comprehensive Circulation Study #5 (Campus Parking Survey), a fore- 
cast of parking needs of the campus. He stated that on the basis 
of parking demand, a structure is clearly warranted. There are now 
900 faculty and staff located in the area outlined, near the Stu- 
dent Union, and -400 parking spaces. Much of this parking will be 
lost when the Campus Center is built. Expanded use of the con- 
ference facilities and elimination of former parking areas in 



28 






UM at 

Boston 

Space 



UM at 
Boston 
Master 
Plan 



Parking 
Garage 



2854 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

campus construction plans, however, make it evident that additional 
parking is vital. The proposal is a large parking structure to 
accommodate one thousand or more vehicles, to be located in the 
ravine. The sketches revealed truck access on the lowest level to 
service underground delivery points to the Campus Center and the 
Student Union. 

There was discussion. President Lederle wanted to make 
certain that there would be a large enough demand to self-liquidate 
the project. Mr. Galehouse defended this selection by saying that 
potentially, there will be 1600 persons in the surrounding buildings 
the Library, Machmer Hall, etc., not counting students, visitors or 
conferees. Treasurer Johnson then outlined estimated preliminary 
costs, stating the garage would cost about two and one-half million 
dollars to build. It was felt practical to assume that a fee for 
parking v/ould be charged, the basis for which could be adjusted in 
later years if necessary. For example, conference visitors would 
be expected to pay a standard rate; faculty and students might be 
charged at other rates. Monthly or season rates would be special 
and so on. Studies to date indicate the project will be self-liqui- 
dating. 

The faculty master planning committee recommends 
unanimously that a thousand car parking garage be constructed on a 
self-liquidating project to be amortized from parking fees and that 
the project be made a part of the Campus Center now under design 
by Marcel Breuer so that it may also provide underground vehicle 
and service access to the Campus Center and the Student Union. 

It is clear, however, that all parking close to the center 
of the campus will become restricted this fall when the Campus 
Center, Bartlett East and the Machmer Hall addition will be under 
construction. These projects will be followed by the Library and 
the Graduate Research Center which will place a still heavier park- 
ing burden on this area. Consideration was given to parking at the 
Stadium and providing a shuttle bus; other solutions were discussed. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a request be made to the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority that a 
parking structure for approximately 1,000 
cars to be amortized from parking fees, 
be added to the C;>mpus Center project now 
under design by Marcel Breuer, with pro- 
vision therein for vehicle and service 
access below ground to the Campus Center 
and the Student Union to be located 
essentially in accordance with site plans 
as developed by the University's Master 
Planners, Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay and 
Associates. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next item on the agenda, Faculty Club - Homestead, 
was described by Treasurer Johnson and illustrated with a sketch 
displayed on an easel. Basically, it has become necessary to move 
the "Homestead" to make way for the Graduate Center. It is 
recommended that this building be moved to the area of the Faculty 
Club and architecturally integrated with it to maintain the 
colonial aspects. The Faculty Club members are willing to contri- 
bute to this. 

There was discussion which revealed a number of divergent 
views. Mr. Galehouse's professional opinion was a strong 
recommendation to retain both buildings, but consideration of other 
sites was encouraged. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the removal of the Homestead 
to a site cooperative with the Faculty Club. 

Treasurer Johnson introduced the next agenda item, 
Alumni Building - Renovations. He stated that renovations of the 
basement area in the Alumni Building could now move forward. The 
original major changes requested have been modified. Motion was 
made and seconded, and then it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize the administration to pro- 
ceed with the renovation of the Alumni 
Building. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that Attorney Broadhurst of 
Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor had prepared for the Building 
Authority the Contracts for Financial Assistance for the Campus 
Center. 

It is expected that the Campus Center will cost eleven 
million dollars. The Student Union fee will advance to $30 in the 
fall. In addition, a conference fee will be established for $2.00 
or $3.00 per person, depending on the length of time the Center is 
used. This will amortize the cost over 25-30 years. 

It will be suggested that the lease on the Student Union 
will be assigned by the Trustees of the Building Authority to make 
possible the integrated Student Union-Campus Center project. 

Treasurer Johnson circulated a memorandum from Dean 
Field indicating there is a need for housing for 1400 students and 
additional dining halls for September 1970. He stated we are be- 
hind schedule with University College because of the problem of 
how to finance the academic space in it. Mr. Broadhurst will have 
a summary prepared for the meeting to be held January 31st. 



and, 



Discussion was held and motion was made and seconded 
it was then 



285" 



Faculty 
Club - 
Homestead 



Alumni 

Building 

Renovations 



Contracts 
for Financial 
Assistance 



Campus 
Center 



2856 



Additional 
Housing & 
Dining 
Facilities 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve continued study through Mr. 
Galehouse of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates ^ 
of location of additional housing for students. 

A possibility of locating a dormitory between Hills House 
and the Faculty Apartments was introduced to the meeting, with the 
urgent recommendation of quick action so that recommendation can be 
prepared in time for the Trustee meeting on January 31, 1967. 

Treasurer Johnson submitted a letter from Mr. Chase in 
which the matter of rate of fee for design of the library, in- 
cluding interior, was explored. Discussion followed. It was the 
sense of the meeting that Mr. Chase should be supported in his 
efforts to arrive at an equitable fee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:4-5 p.m. 



I 




Robert 0". McCartney / 
Secretary, Board of Tru/tqes 
\J I / 



\\ 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT 
AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

January 11, 1967, 2:4-5 p.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Emerson, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Maginnis, Thompson, 
Troy; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Dean 
Redfern, Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Emerson opened the meeting with reference to 
the memorandum which had been supplied to the members of the 
committee, the subject of which was Name Designation of University 
of Massachusetts Athletic Teams. Trustee Maginnis spoke in 
support of the suggestion contained therein. It was agreed that 
this matter should be brought to the attention of the Board of 
Trustees, the Athletic Council, the Board of Directors of the 
Associate Alumni and the Student Senate so that a consensus of 
views on the proposal of Trustee Maginnis could be obtained. 

There was an exchange of views and discussion of the 
legislative program for the year. 

Pending legislation in the form of Bills were briefly 
summarized by Dean Redfern. Digests are to be supplied to each 
committee member. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




Robert /J./ McCartney 
Secretary, (Board of Trustees 



285? 



Name of 

Athletic 

Teams 



2858 



COMMITTEE 



Selective 

Merit 

Increments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDU- 
CATIONAL POLICY 

January 18, 1967, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Lyons; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Chancellor Ryan, Secretary McCartney, 
Miss Coulter. 



I 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Personnel Director DeNyse, 
Assistant Provost Venman, Dean 
Tunis, Dean Gagnon. 



Chairman Troy opened the meeting with the first agenda 
item, Recommendations for Selective Merit Increments. He stated 
the members of the committee had been supplied, in advance of the 
meeting with this document and enclosure 63-050. The Chairman 
commended the practice of supplying full information to keep the 
committee closely informed as to methods and procedures for de- 
termining merit increments. 

The President noted that these increments are recommended 
on the basis of funds provided by the Legislature for this purpose, 
in a vote passed in 1966. 

Provost Tippo, at the suggestion of the Chairman, 
described and discussed the form used to analyze and evaluate the 
professional staff. Samples of the completed forms were examined 
and commended by the members of the committee. The Provost 
described the procedure used in allocating selective annual merit 
increments and the process of making promotions and tenure 
recommendations. He emphasized that the selective merit increments 
are intended to recognize outstanding service to the University in 
teaching, research and public service. Provost Tippo said the de- 
cisions are arrived at through an elaborate process with many 
people involved, starting with the evaluation by the department 
head and dean, up through to the Provost and the President. In 
addition, the Provost reviews each Dean's recommendations with him 
personally. Chancellor Ryan said a similar formula is followed at 
the University of Massachusetts in Boston. Faculty personnel 
committees review and recommend in all schools. 

Trustee Lambson expressed the general view that this is 
a very fair system. The committee concurred. 

The Provost completed his summarization by noting that 
66% of the Amherst faculty are recommended to receive increments, 
within the 5% legislative merit increase allowance. The Chancellor 
added that l$% of the Boston faculty were so recommended. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Review procedures are established, in the event of any- 
discontent on the part of any member of the faculty, which include 
discussion with the immediate department head, dean, Provost, 
President and the appropriate faculty grievance committee. The 
President said faculty published research is a valuable indication 
of professional calibre, but the individual faculty member lists 
everything which he believes is worthy of merit, adding up to his 
total contribution to the University. Much more than published 
research receives weight by those reviewing merit recommendations. 

The Provost announced that two of the three major appoint|- 
ments that he had hoped could be made had declined. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve the recommendation for promo- 
tions at the University of Massachusetts 
in Boston effective February 5, 1967 as 
detailed in Document 67-044. 

Chancellor Ryan advised the committee that he had been 
invited to attend a meeting of the Roxbury Council on January 26, 
1967, at which time the Council hopes to explore the extent of 
the University's interest in the Highland Park area of Boston. 
The Chancellor suggested that a mechanism be set up to determine 
exactly what workable solutions could be developed for Highland 
Park taking into account what space the University might require, 
and what landmarks or other areas should be preserved. Chancellor 
Ryan suggested that the Trustees be represented by the Chairman of 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee at the meeting on the 26th. 

The Provost commented on the list of promotions which 
had been supplied to the committee members prior to the meeting. 
After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the list of recommended promotions as shown 
on attached Document 67-045 be approved, 
effective February 5, 1967. 

President Lederle asked Treasurer Johnson to describe 
the plan for rounding off the basic annual salaries. The Treasurer, 
said a pay plan has been set up which establishes every salary on 
an annual basis in even $100 rates. These annual rates are 
divided by 52 weeks to provide the weekly rate for pay purposes. 
It is the weekly rate that, by statute, is the rate of pay. The 
complete plan will be presented to the full Board of Trustees at 
its next meeting. Under the statute it is necessary to classify 
all University positions at the new rates. It will next be 
necessary to vote the new rates, merit increments, and the new 
classifications. After discussion, a motion was made, seconded, 
and it was 



2859 



Promotions 
UM at Boston 



Meeting 

with 

Roxbury 

Council re 

Highland 

Park 



Promotions 
UM at Amherst 



Rounding 
off Basic 
Salaries 



2860 



COMMITTEE 



Salary- 
Schedule 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the classification, salary and salary range 
of the professional staff in accordance 
with the provisions of section 14 of Chapter 
75 of the General Laws, as amended, effective 
on and after February fifth, nineteen hundred 
and sixty-seven shall he established within 
the minimum weekly rate and maximum weekly 
rate of the General Salary Schedule contained 
in paragraph (l) of section forty-six of 
chapter thirty of the General Laws as most 
recently amended by Chapter 635 of the Acts 
of nineteen hundred sixty-six in accordance 
with the weekly salary rates in the follow- 
ing schedule: 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Professional Salary Schedule 
Effective February 5, 1967 



Converted 



Converted 



Weekly- 


to Annual 


V/eekly 


to Annual 


Salary 


Rate 


Salary 


Rate 


Rate 


(52 weeks) 


Rate 


(%?_weeks) 


92.30 


4800.00 


144.23 


7500.00 


9-4.23 


4900.00 


146.15 


7600.00 


96.15 


5000.00 


148.07 


7700.00 


98.07 


5100.00 


150.00 


7800.00 


100.00 


5200.00 


151.92 


7900.00 


101.92 


5300.00 


153.84 


8000.00 


103.84 


5400.00 


155.76 


8100.00 


105.76 


5500.00 


157.69 


8200.00 


107.69 


5600.00 


159.61 


8300.00 


109.61 


5700.00 


161.53 


84OO.OO 


111.53 


5800.00 


163.46 


8500.00 


113.46 


5900.00 


165.38 


8600.00 


115.38 


6000.00 


167.30 


8700.00 


117.30 


6100.00 


169.23 


8800.00 


119.23 


6200.00 


171.15 


8900.00 


121.15 


6300.00 


173.07 


9000.00 


123.07 


6400.00 


175.00 


9100.00 


125.00 


6500.00 


176.92 


9200.00 


126.92 


6600.00 


178.84 


9300.00 


128.84 


6700.00 


180.76 


9400.00 


130.76 


6800.00 


182.69 


9500.00 


132.69 


6900.00 


184.61 


9600.00 


134.61 


7000.00 


186.53 


9700.00 


136.53 


7100.00 


188.46 


9800.00 


138.46 


7200.00 


190.38 


9900.00 


140.38 


7300.00 


192.30 


10000.00 


142.30 


7400.00 


194.23 


10100.00 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2861 





Converted 




Converted 


Weekly- 


to Annual 


Weekly 


to Annual 


Salary 


Rate 


Salary 


Rate 


Rate 


(52 weeks) 


Rate 


(52 weeks) 


196.15 


10200.00 


288.46 


15000.00 


198.07 


10300.00 


290.38 


15100.00 


200.00 


10400.00 


292.30 


15200.00 


201.92 


10500.00 


294.23 


15300.00 


203.84 


10600.00 


296.15 


15400.00 


205.76 


10700.00 


298.07 


15500.00 


207.69 


10800.00 


300.00 


15600.00 


209.61 


10900.00 


301.92 


15700.00 


211.53 


11000.00 


303.84 


15800.00 


213.46 


11100.00 


305.76 


15900.00 


215.38 


11200.00 


307.69 


16000.00 


217.30 


11300.00 


309.61 


16100.00 


219.23 


11400.00 


3H.53 


16200.00 


221.15 


11500.00 


313.46 


16300.00 


223.07 


11600.00 


315.38 


16400.00 


225.00 


11700.00 


317.30 


16500.00 


226.92 


11800.00 


319.23 


16600.00 


228.84 


11900.00 


321.15 


16700.00 


230.76 


12000.00 


323.07 


16800.00 


232.69 


12100.00 


325.00 


16900.00 


234.61 


12200.00 


326.92 


17000.00 


236.53 


12300.00 


328.84 


17100.00 


238.46 


12400.00 


330.76 


17200.00 


240.38 


12500.00 


332.69 


17300.00 


242.30 


12600.00 


334.61 


17400.00 


244.23 


12700.00 


336.53 


17500.00 


246.15 


12800.00 


338.46 


17600.00 


248.07 


12900.00 


340.38 


17700.00 


250.00 


13000.00 


342.30 


17800.00 


251.92 


13100.00 


344.23 


17900.00 


253.84 


13200.00 


346.15 


18000.00 


255.76 


13300.00 


348.07 


18100.00 


257.69 


13400.00 


350.00 


18200.00 


259.61 


13500.00 


351.92 


18300.00 


261.53 


13600.00 


353.84 


18400.00 


263.46 


13700.00 


355.76 


18500.00 


265.38 


13800.00 


357.69 


18600.00 


267.30 


13900.00 


359.61 


18700.00 


269.23 


14000.00 


361.53 


18800.00 


271.15 


14100.00 


363.46 


18900.00 


273.07 


14200.00 


365.38 


19000.00 


275.00 


14300.00 


367.30 


19100.00 


276.92 


14400.00 


369.23 


19200.00 


278.84 


14500.00 


371.15 


19300.00 


280.76 


14600.00 


373.07 


19400.00 


282.69 


14700.00 


375.00 


19500.00 


284.61 


14800.00 


376.92 


19600.00 


286.53 


14900.00 


378.84 


19700.00 



2862 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Converted 



Converted 



Merit 
Increments 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



Weekly 


to Annual 


Weekly 


to Annual 


Salary- 


Rate 


Salary 


Rate 


Rate 


(52 weeks) 


Rate 


(52 weeks) 


380.76 


19800.00 


428.84 


22300.00 


332.69 


19900.00 


430.76 


22400.00 


384.61 


20000.00 


432.69 


22500.00 


386.53 


20100.00 


434.61 


22600.00 


388.46 


20200.00 


436.53 


22700.00 


390.38 


20300.00 


438.46 


22800.00 


392.30 


20400.00 


440.38 


22900.00 


394.23 


20500.00 


442.30 


23000.00 


396.15 


20600.00 


444.23 


23100.00 


398.07 


20700.00 


446.15 


23200.00 


400.00 


20800.00 


448.07 


23300.00 


401.92 


20900.00 


450.00 


23400.00 


403.84 


21000.00 


451.92 


23500.00 


405.76 


21100.00 


453.84 


23600.00 


407.69 


21200.00 


455.76 


23700.00 


409.61 


21300.00 


457.69 


23800.00 


411.53 


21400.00 


459.61 


23900.00 


413.46 


21500.00 


461.53 


24000.00 


415.38 


21600.00 


463.46 


24100.00 


417.30 


21700.00 


465.38 


24200.00 


419.23 


21800.00 


467.30 


24300.00 


421.15 


21900.00 


469.23 


24400.00 


423.07 


22000.00 


471.15 


24500.00 


425.00 


22100.00 


473.07 


24600.00 


426.92 


22200.00 


475.00 


24700.00 



It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the schedule of Selective 
Merit Increments and the increases con- 
tained therein effective February 5, 1967 
as contained in Document 67-042, which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the Classification of Position 
Titles, effective on and after February 5, 
1967, as detailed in Document 67-043 which 
document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was informal discussion as to the percentage of 
transfer students admitted to the University. The President said 
this is a most important field for consideration. A program 
should be developed to share some of the transfer load with other 
state institutions. The President asked Dean Tunis to join the 
committee for a continued, informal exploration of our transfer 
policy and the generaltransfer policy throughout the State. 

The Chairman introduced the subject of a proposed change 
in the cumulative average required for graduation at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst from 1.8 to 2.0. The Office of 
Institutional Studies had prepared, and there were distributed 
copies of a document entitled "A Survey of Policies and Practices 
Regarding Undergraduate Academic Standards." 

There was discussion as to individual grading practices, 
equity to the student and the general beneficial effect of the pro- 
posed change. An analysis of dismissal rates for the five most 
recent years was scanned and interpreted as part of the Office of 
Institutional Studies Survey. Dr. Venman stated it was proposed 
to put the new, required cumulative average into effect with the 
issuance of the next catalogue. After motion was made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve 2.0 as the required cumulative 
average for graduation at UM at Amherst, 
starting with the class of 1972 with the 
qualification that the administration has 
the right to make adjustment if the rate 
of attrition becomes excessive. 

There was an exchange of views and discussion as to the 
acceptance of the University of Massachusetts graduates at other 
Graduate Schools. It v/as the general consensus that , nationally, 
our graduates had been found to be in the top percentage. 

Informal discussion of the curtailment of a recent art 
exhibit from the Student Union lobby resulted in the generally 
accepted view that a committee should be formed to review exhibits 
before public display, just as there is a committee to consider 
books before publication, etc. to determine acceptability within 
the general climate of learning associated with a university. 

The meeting was adjourned. 




J. McCartney 
Board of Trust 




2863 



Transfer 

Student 

Policy 



Proposed 
Change : 
Required 
Cumulative 
Grade Point 
Average 



Record of 
UM Students 
in Other 
Graduate 
Schools 

Removal of 
Art Exhibit 



2864 



COMMITTEE 



Library 

Classification 
of Pro- 
fessional 
Librarians 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 15, 1967, 11:55 a.m., Dukes Room, Student Union 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, Trustees Haigis and Lyons; 
Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Gagnon, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Miss Coulter. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Acting Director of Libraries Clay, 
Dean Hunsberger, Dean Redfern, Dean 
Moore, Dean Picha, Professor Norton, 
Dr. Piccus, Professor Havard; Peter A. 
Ward of the Fine Arts Council and 
Bert Friedman of the Student Senate. 



The meeting was called to order by the Chairman at 
11:55 a.m. 

At the invitation of the Provost, Acting Director of 
Libraries Clay presented a report on Library Progress, including 
a proposed Classification of Professional Librarians (Document 
67-050), dated December 9, 1966, copies of which were supplied to 
committee members present. 

Professor Clay commented on the current situation in his 
department as related to personnel, and the plans for the future. 
He stated the proposed salary ranges were revised after cheeking 
throughout the country with similar universities. 

Also distributed were copies of a summary showing 
Academic Library Statistics, issued by the Association of Research 
Libraries, and a listing prepared to show the Largest Library Hold- 
ings in North American Colleges and Universities by Total Number 
of Volumes (1964.-65). Professor Clay stated the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst presently has 450,000 volumes, which is 
far too few. He stated the collections are small compared to our 
academic programs; the need is for a million and a half volumes at 
least to support the anticipated results. Professor Clay went on 
to describe the steps being taken to improve the journal collection 
as well as the retrospective selection of material, aided by 
faculty with released time. He expressed the hope that the staff 
would be enlarged to include people with advanced degrees in subject 
disciplines and thus release faculty now working in the library. 

A visiting consultant expressed satisfaction with the im- 
proved "request" routines. The matter of space continues to be a 
problem; a possible solution is the establishment of a duplicate 
reserve operation, possibly in the Southwest area and another in the 
Hill area. These matters are all receiving active consideration, as 
is the possibility of an automated acquisition program. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The new library building is receiving serious attention, 
including weekly visits to the architect's New York office, in 
company with Planning Officer Littlefield. This is a tightly 
organized building because of the imaginative design and requires 
much planning to fit everything into place. Satisfactory progress 
is being made and it promises to be a magnificent, pace-setting 
building . 

Personnel policies are being reviewed, including sab- 
batical leave opportunities. Professor Clay stated the salary 
range is competitive at this time, with other areas of the country 
and that most of the leading universities, including Illinois and 
Michigan, have this system on outright equation with faculty range. 

Provost Tippo regretted that copies of this material had 
not been supplied to the University of Massachusetts at Boston in 
advance of the meeting; however Chancellor Ryan will now present it 
to his Library Committee and it will then be possible to submit a 
recommendation to the Board at its meeting on the 24th, for both 
campuses. In response to a question from Chancellor P»yan, Acting 
Director of Libraries Clay stated it is planned to reclassify the 
entire professional staff on the Amherst campus if the Trustees 
approve of the classifications as proposed. The effect will be so 
far as the present staff is concerned, to retain the old title, as 
well as the new. This plan was passed without a dissenting vote by 
the professional staff at their meeting, he said. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED ! To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the proposed classification 
system for professional librarians. 



2865 



Dean of the Graduate School, Edward Moore, introduced to 
the meeting, Dr. Jules Piccus, who was about to leave for Madrid, 
to continue his translation of the Leonardo da Vinci manuscripts 
discovered during his sabbatical and now receiving world-wide 
acclaim. 

Trustee Haigis stated many small area libraries undoubted- 
ly have manuscripts which might well be included in the University 
Library and would prove of valuable interest; he agreed to spot 
cheek those in his area. 

Dean Hunsberger discussed overscale appointments. He 
asked for a statement of policy in regard to this matter, stating 
the search for top-quality staff was very time-consuming and if the 
salary limit is set with no possibility of improvement, it is use- 
less to actively engage in interviews or exploratory conversations 
with the type of top-calibre people we are seeking for Headships in 
Psychology, Economics and English. The dean pointed out that the 
calibre of student is influenced by the quality of faculty. He 
pointed out that so far he has been able to secure only one 
acceptance out of eight serious approaches. 



Leonardo 
da Vinci 
Manuscripts 



Headships in 
Psychology 
Economics 
English 



2866 



COMMITTEE 



Continuing 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion in general as to what is expected in 
a top-rated candidate; the Provost pointed out one criterion is 
membership in the National Academy in addition to general acceptance 
in his field. 

Dean Hunsberger described several people he had hoped to 
interest in joining the University staff and the limitation the 
current salary scale imposed. He said a possible Economics Head- 
ship already received $29,500 and it would be impossible for him to 
consider a change on our proposed basis. 

The Provost referred to the fact that the Economics field 
is the most difficult one in which to secure a Headship, as this 
field commands extraordinary salaries. 

Dean Hunsberger then left the meeting. 

Dean Redfern submitted a report on Continuing Education, 
which encompassed the history and background of the planning and 
the burgeoning need. The Dean distributed to the committee a 
"Draft, Discussion Paper for Decisions Relative to the University 
of Massachusetts and Continuing Education." This is a result of 
three years of study beginning with an informal ad hoc committee, a 
work group on fees and charges and discussions with selected people 
engaged in continuing education. The latter included representa- 
tives of the Massachusetts Adult Education Association, the former 
Division of University Extension (Department of Education) and the 
Boston university Metropolitan College. 

Dean Redfern stated the report has been approved in 
principle by the Deans' Council (acting as a Committee on Continu- 
ing Education); as well as Residence College Masters Drs. Varley 
and Shijte; Professor Seligman and Mr. Durgin, Conference Coordina- 
tor, all of whom would be involved in the proposed program. It is 
hoped now to secure administration and trustee approval of the 
following : 



1. 



2. 



3. 

4. 



The principle that programs in continuing education 
and extension be based upon the schools, colleges 
and departments of tne University. This is 
analogous to uie present Graduate Scnool structure. 

The principle that the programs in this area be 
statewide in scope, witn opportunities for co- 
operating actions witn otner institutions and 
associations to implement this principle. 

The principle uiat university programs be of 
a university level only. 

A Division of Continuing Education be established 
under a University Advisory committee, headed by 
a Dean of Continuing Education who will be 
assisted initially by a Director of Non-Resident 
Studies and a Director of Community Services 



] 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(together with necessary clerical staff.) In 
the future a Director of conferences and Insti- 
tutels may be requested to supplement tne staff. 

5. The principle that the State has an obligation -go 
assist in support of continuing education as a 
public responsibility. 

6. The assessment of a $2 continuing education fee 
for enrollment in all courses or conferences 
conducted under -one auspices of the Division to 
help defray cost of space, facilities and ser- 
vices provided to the Division by one Student 
Union-Campus Center, or by UMass-Boston. 

The Dean discussed the internal considerations of the 
proposed plan, including the proposed organizational pattern. He 
summarized by stating pending Bills indicate interest along onese 
lines; we have the beginnings of activity in this area, but need a 
better and firmer direction, a continuous effort and some clearer 
definition of the University goals in this area. 

There was discussion. Cnairman Troy stated it is 
necessary j,o think increasingly in terms of priorities and limited 
state funds. Any program which will incur costs must be considered 
carefully. 

Treasurer Jonnson commented, the budget for two years uas 
had provision for suc±i a program of continuing education, in prepa- 
ration for the modest initial cost as anticipated and described by 
Dean Redfern. 

Chancellor Ryan commented that the plan is a good one, 
but does not affect Boston as mucn as Amoerst. 

The Faculty Senate nas examined this proposal at Amherst, 
but Boston has not. Chancellor Ryan feels Boston, too, should nave 
tnis opportunity as well as the Academic Committee in Boston. It 
was then suggested by Provost Tippo with the concurrence of the 
Chairman, that Dean Redfern present this report to the full Board 
of Trustees for discussion. 

A memorandum to the Provost by the Dean of the Graduate 
School on the subject of a Ph.D. Program in Physics at Lowell 
Technological Institute was distributed to the members of the com- 
mittee, as well as a copy of the "Physics Doctoral Program" issued 
by the Graduate School of the Institute. Dean Moore submitted the 
proposal under the provisions of the Willis Act (wherein "authority 
to award an earned doctoral degree shall reside exclusively in the 
University of Massachusetts..."). This is the first doctoral pro- 
gram submitted under this new procedure. 



286? 



Ph.D. Program 
in Physics 
at Lowell 
Technological 
Institute 



2868 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Moore stated the proposal was discussed at two meet- 
ings of the Graduate Council Curriculum Committee, at two meetings 
of the Graduate Council and at a meeting of the Faculty Senate 
Academic Matters Committee. There were unanimous votes to recom- 
mend the proposal to the Board of Trustees and to the Faculty- 
Senate Academic Matters Committee. 

In making the recommendation to the Board of Trustees to 
support the proposal, the aforementioned committees voted that the 
following items be made a part of the approval: 

1. That it is expected that Lowell Technological 
Institute will make a serious effort to improve 
its graduate offerings in Applied Mathematics 
during the next two years. 

2. That the Institute give careful thought to pro- 
viding a more sophisticated computer center for 
the academic and research needs of the students. 

3. That the Institute make a sustained effort to 
obtain federal support for fellowships in order 
to allow its students to work full time on 
their doctoral program. 

4. That the Institute respond to the fact that its 
library is only minimally adequate for a doctoral 
program in physical sciences and that it under- 
take a major library development program. 

5. That the Institute review its policy on addition- 
al compensation to faculty for research, so as to 
limit such compensation to no more than one day 

a week, to move it primarily into the summer 
months, and to reorient it toward grant research 
rather' than contract research. 

6. That each doctoral committee appointed during 
the first three years of the program shall have, 
as a member, one person from the University of 
Massachusetts approved by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of a Physics Doctoral Program for 
Lowell Technological Institute, as submitted, 
under the provisions of the Willis Act 
(section 18, Ch. 572, 1965 Acts of the 
Commonwealth) . 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was submitted to the Committee, a memorandum list- 
ing a recommendation of a Fine Arts Fee for 1967-68. Appearing as 
proponents were Professor Norton and Mr. Peter Ward of the Fine 
Arts Council and Mr. Bert Friedman of the Student Senate. The 
budget submitted is based on a fee of $3.00 per semester per stu- 
dent; this amount is $1.00 less than allowed under the constitution 
of the Fine Arts Council. The students now pay $2.00 per semester. 
The proposed fee has been approved by the Student Senate. It was 
stated that provision had been made for a secretary, in the budget, 
but it was hoped the University would feel this item could be 
assimilated and thus relieve the Fine Arts Program of the cost. 

There was discussion as to the events to be sponsored, 
the types of programs and the propriety of including the salary for 
a secretary in the budget as indicated on page 2 of the memorandum. 
The Provost stated it was difficult to assume the $10.00 sum needed 
for the staff assistant, especially in view of the late submission 
of the budget item, far less an additional provision for a secretary 
There was concern expressed by the Provost at rising costs for the 
student; he asked for a listing of taxes now existing. An informal 
listing was discussed. Mr. Friedman said there are now at least 
three places where personnel is supported by taxes (Student Senate, 
Collegian and RS0 Office). 

On motion made, seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the proposed Fine Arts Budget 
and fee of $3.00 per semester. 

Dean Picha joined the meeting and briefly described a 
"work-study" program recently instituted. He described the program 
as extremely successful and beneficial to the students involved. 
It is planned to continue. The student graduates with several years 
of industrial experience. The students permitted to subscribe to 
this program must be in the upper half of the mechanical engineering 
class. 

Dr. William Havard joined the meeting and copies of a 
memorandum ("Aide-Memoire") were distributed. Dr. Havard described 
the proposal to initiate a new professional political science 
journal under the sponsorship of the various Political Science 
Associations in the Northeastern States. He described the lack of 
such a publication in the area and the need. The practical aspects 
of producing such a New England Journal were described. A subsidy 
of $6,000 would be required. 

The meeting was adjourned 



Fine Arts 
Fee 




t Robert' J. fee Cart 
Secretary ^ Board of Trustee 



Engineering 

Work-Study 

Plan 



Political 

Science 

Journal 



28*70 



COMMITTEE 



New 

Residence 
Halls and 
Dining 
Facilities 



Site 

Prospects 
for UM at 
Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 16, 1967, 10:00 a.m., Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc, 

23 Main Street, Watertown, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustee Maginnis; Chancellor Ryan, 
Dean Gagnon, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

Representing Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay, Inc: 
Messrs. Sasaki, Galehouse, Alexander, 
Minervino and Von Valkenburg. 

Mr. Frank O'Brien of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston. 

Chairman Haigis introduced Mr. Galehouse of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay, Inc. who reported on preliminary investigations for 
new residence halls . One would accommodate 900 students and be 
located near the north dining commons; the second, for 500 students, 
would be located somewhere in the vicinity of Baker and Van Meter 
Houses . 

At the north end of campus, one possibility would be to 
"weave" buildings in through the existing quadrangles for women, 
possibly adding a seven or even fourteen-story high-rise facility 
with appropriately integrated design and fenestration. 

Preliminary surveys indicate that a new dining commons 
might be feasible southwest of the present Orchard Hill complex, 
and south of the President's House. 

Chairman Haigis expressed satisfaction with the initial 
survey, and commented that all alternatives should be studied 
further. He stated that he was not in favor of additional build- 
ings near the University Faculty Apartment site, adjacent to what 
will become the main entrance of the campus. 

The Chairman invited Chancellor Ryan to introduce the 
discussion of potential urban sites for location of the campus for 
UMB at Boston. 

The Chancellor, in turn, introduced Mr. Frank O'Brien, 
formerly of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, who has just joined 
his staff and has already been helpful in bringing information 
together. Dr. Ryan noted that the wall display of the entire down- 
town section of Boston indicated that seven possible sites might be 
available . Potentially, any one of these might be developed; how- 
ever, each presented particular advantages and difficulties. Mr. 
Sasaki stated that his firm was engaged at the moment in two major 
studies. The first would determine the minimum size of site which 
could be used. (Size of site increases in acreage as you move 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"out" from the center of one downtown section.) Secondly, a series 
of criteria has been developed for evaluating each site. Tne in- 
tent would be to work up an actual evaluation of eacn potential sit€ 
based on how it measured up against the stated criteria. 

Mr. Galehouse introduced Mr. Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay, Inc. to describe tne projections and criteria in detail. 
Tnese follow: 

1. Building Space Estimates - Total, 3, 333,000 sq. rt.)15j000 

+ 4500 parking space - l,v?0,U00 sq. ft.) students 

2. a. Utilization Factors 

Laboratory and special - 33% 
Seminar - 6u% 

Lecture -65% 

b. Effect Factor 

o0% of seats occupied when room used 

c. Research Space 

25% of faculty in individual research 
(each has 4 graduate assistants) 

d. Parking Space - 4500 

Faculty and Staff - 60% arrive by auto 

40% of students arrive by car 

Also - assume each space used 2 times a day 

e. Indoor Athletics 

2 practice basketball courts 
10 squash or nandball courts 
swimming pool 
5 rooms miscellaneous 

f . Outdoor Athletics - none 

g. Informal play - none or on top of parking 
n. Dormitories - none 
i. Museum or gallery - none 

J. Enrollments Related to Building Space Estimates 

a. Basic Enrollment 

Daytime students - full load - 13,500 
Graduate students - 1.500 

b. Daytime full load and partial load 

Undergraduate 20,250 

Graduate 2.000 

22,250 



2871 



2872 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

'.. Daytime and evening students carrying full load 
Undergraduate 18, 000 

Graduate 2.000 



d. 



4. 



<i0,000 

Daytime and evening students carrying partial load 
Undergraduate 27,000 

Graduate 2,700 

29,700 



A. Site Criteria 

a. Size - Buiidable area 

b. Parking Assumption 

c. Density of Development 

d. Land Expansion possibilities 



B. Location 

a. Access 

b. Surrounding area 



(types of buildings, also 
people) 



C Development Potential 

a. Visibility - (are we readily seen (Prudential). 

b. Function 

c. Architectural Expression 

D. Economic Feasibility 

a. Acquisition Cost 

b. Demolition cost 

c. Construction Cost 

d. Premium Construction Cost 

e. Property Tax (Lien?) - (How much taxable 

property displaced) 

E. Availability 

a. Dislocation - (who and how mucn)? 
d. Persons or groups concerned 
c. Timing 

Moving from a discussion of the projected needs and 
criteria to three dimension layouts, Mr. Alexander commented on tne 
scale model tests tney juave made to determine wnat the smallest size 
of site might be for 15,000 commuting students. 

The building blocks representing square footage were laid 
out to scale over blow-up maps of existing portions of available 
sites. Layouts were explained for 20, 15 and 10 acre sites showing 
density of use for 5,000 students. 

The conclusion of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay, Inc. was that, 
for planning purposes, block units representing 15 acre sites 
represented the absolute minimum; also, that three such sites, or a 
total of 45 acres, would represent the most adequate minimum 
solution for a campus of 15,000 students. Chancellor Ryan noted 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that it might he possible to plan a campus for 15,000 students on 
30 acres, providing parking facilities were buried under ground or 
construction erected over parking units at the ground level. He 
added that there was no question in his mind but what that the 
campus should be ^non-residential, although it may have some resi- 
dential potential. Planning on a minimum basis presupposes that 
auditorium and art gallery space which is not provided for could he 
made available throughout the city of Boston. On the other hand, 
the Chancellor stressed that the importance of such facilities 
should not be ignored in the minds of the students, as well as 
generally in providing for a well-rounded academic life. 

Mr. Anderson stressed that in all of the projections in 
site criteria considered, there was no information available at 
this time on the economic feasibility of any of the alternatives. 
Among the basic sites considered were the following: 

1. Highland Park 

2. Governor Shirley Memorial Site 

3. Columbia Point 

4. Naval Annex area - South Boston 

5. Fort Point Channel 

6. South Station 

7. Copley Square - turnpike 

There was no clear indication given by the consulting 
firm on any of these sites that any agreements existed whereby they 
would be actively and immediately availahle in 'whole or in part. 

For purposes of considering possible site utilization in 
greater detail, Mr. William Minervino of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay, Inc. 
called attention to a table layout where possible building struc- 
tures were erected over sectional map blowups in larger scale. The 
sites represented were, (a) South Station, (b) Copley Square - 
turnpike area, and (c) Highland Park. 

It was brought out that extensive use of pilings would be 
involved in both the South Station and Copley Square sites, whereas 
the Highland Park location consisted of rock ledge. It was pointed 
out that part of the South Station site might be available now; 
also, that preliminary inquiry concerning the Copley Square location 
had been given a good reception by members of the Back Bay Associ- 
ation. 

Projecting a timetable, Mr. Minervino indicated that 
economic feasibility data could be ready by March-April, 1967 - 
that sufficiently complete data for a Trustee decision on site 
might be pulled together by May, 1967, looking toward a public 
announcement in July of this year. Trustee Maginnis observed that 
the Legislature had given the Board of Trustees a mandate to obtain 
a site and build on it in the shortest time possible. He queried 
whether the committee would move toward selection of a site where it 
thinks it ought to be, or look toward a site "which we think we can 
get." Chancellor Ryan added that it would be most useful to explore 



2873 



2874 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the relative tax impact in certain of the site areas. Mr. O'Brien 
commented that, regardless of which site is selected, there will be 
strong pressure for "in lieu" tax payments - although such payments 
might be expected to vary from site to site. Dr. Ryan added, that 
legislation should be prepared at tne earliest possible moment, 
witn .respect to tne 'in lieu of tax" problem, since it takes so 
long to obtain enactment. 

Chairman Haigis detailed ror one Trustees and consultants 
certain aspects of his plan for the Copley Square area which would 
involve tne following: 

1. Wnerever possible, take land where no taxes are 
involved . 

2. Return more to Boston in taxes than was there 
before. Tnis would require construction of 
commercially taxable units at the ground level, 
and rentable apartment space at the top level, 
with UM at Boston academic space structured 
into an "academic sandwich" in between. 

He noted that 25,000 students at $i!00 per year would in- 
volve 5 million dollars annually in i'ees; tnis would add up to 200 
million dollars over a 40-year amortization period whicn would pro- 
vide for substantial academic construction. 

unanceilor Ryan summarized the proceedings as producing 
two new developments : 

x. Seven sites have been broken out and identified. 

<i. Tne Trustees may now take a new look at density 
of acreage required to accommodate a campus of 
15,000 students. 

The Chancellor stressed tnat ne would like to nave the 
UM at Boston faculty review any plans before Trustees take action. 

It was generally agreed that it would oe useful to group 
the potential sites into categories: good, i'air, poor. He also 
stressed the importance of offering an opportunity to persons 
residing in any potential site area to express txiemselves before 
action is taken. 

Mr. Galehouse reviewed tne steps taken by Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay, Inc. in moving to tnis stage of evaluation. Mr. Sasaki 
stresseu one impor-oance of the next step: categorizing by priority 
xne various sites which seem to be available. President Lederle 
observed tnat the current thinking of the firm is to -squeeze" into 
smaller and smaller acreage, and ne expressed doubt that the Uni- 
versity could be happy indefinitely with 'JO or 40 acres. He said 
the University of Illinois at Chicago now wanted to enlarge its 

100 acre site. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2875 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Sasaki responded that land in the urban center of 
Boston is most difficult to obtain, and tnat nis firm nas been try- 
ing to translate realities into minimums. It was brought out that 
the 30-4-0 acre concept involved only academic space. Unquestionably 
there would be a need for further space related to nousing on other 
modules. In some cases, it nugnt be possible to place housing on 
the upper levels of some of the buildings. Mr. Galehouse observed 
that the plans did not provide for outdoor pnysical education space, 
and that a density similar to that at the Southwest quadrangle on 
tne Amherst campus is what is being considered. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that it would take twice as much 
money and twice as ±ong to build on any of the sites considered at 
today 1 s meeting. Mr. Sasaki added the dimensions might be on the 
order of three times as much and three times as long. 

After furtner discussion, it was agreed that the con- 
sultants should be instructed to prepare a carefully detailed and 
extensive report on each site. It will also be necessary to go to 
the persons who have a principal interest in each of these areas 
including tne mayor, state leadership and otner groups to begin 
conversations and to report back their views to the committee. 

Trustee Maginnis stressed tne urgency of doing a detailed, 
in deptn study of each potential site prior to going to city or 
commonwealtn management levels. 

Treasurer Jonnson expressed deep reservations about all of 
the sites under consideration. In his view, none of tne sites was 
adequate and we could not build what is required on any of tnem. 
Additionally, he could find no room for expansion. Chairman Haigis 
stated that future expansion might lead to the concept of creating 
second or third campuses. 

Chancellor Ryan disagreed with the Treasurer. He pointed 
out that the modules displayed at the meeting indicate tnat it is 
possible to build in the city. Wnether this can be done 'economi- 
cally, chronologically or politically" is anotner question. The 
Treasurer restated his convict ion tnat there is no reason to assume 
tnat any single site mentioned is actually available. Trustee 
Maginnis added that it is not possible to keep deferring indefinite- 
ly to tne ^ity of Boston with respect to ohis matter. The Legis- 
lature, at the state level, nas given the Trustees a clear mandate 
to proceed witn establishment of a campus. Furtner discussion 
centered on the extent of delays which might be involved if the 
BRA is utilized. 

In response to a question, Mr. O'Brien said that under 
urban renewal, it usually takes four to six years to make a site 
available . 

As there was not a quorum of the committee present, con- 
sideration of further items was deferred. 

The meeting was adjourned at 




Sec e 



Rober VJ . ^McCartney 
i a y,' Board of Trus 



Trustees 



2876 



COMMITTEE 



Federal 
Assistance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

February 24, 1967, 11:15 a.m., Southwest Dining Commons #2 

Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Emerson, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Healey, Maginnis, 
Troy; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Redfern, Secretary McCartney, 
Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Emerson called the meeting to order at 11:15 a.m. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Redfern discussed 
a series of proposed resolutions intended for submission to the 
Legislature, providing they are approved by the Board of Trustees. 

The first resolution discussed related to H.R.875. It 
endorsed and supported the concept of federal assistance based upon 
sustained general institutional support as described in this bill, 
now before the federal Congress. Motion was made, seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve and forward to the Legislature 
the following resolution. 

RESOLVED: The Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
aware of the mounting needs being placed upon 
higher education, and aware of the already 
strenuous efforts being made by state govern- 
ments and private benefactors to finance these 
burdens, and further aware that serious defi- 
ciencies currently exist in various forms of 
federal aid, such as complex proposal-grant- 
accounting requirements and more seriously 
distortion of institutional goals through in- 
fluence of specific project approaches by off- 
campus agencies, hereby endorse and support 
the concept of federal assistance based upon 
sustained general institutional support as con- 
tained in H.R.875, now before the federal Congress. 

A resolution in support of S.267, directing the Trustees 
to establish an educational television center at the University was 
submitted for consideration. Motion was made, seconded, and it was 
then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve and forward to the Legislature 
the following resolution. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

RESOLVED: The Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts hereby reaffirms its 
support of S.267 which would direct the 
Trustees to establish, construct and 
maintain an educational television 
center for the promotion and dissemina- 
tion of educational programs for the 
benefit and enrichment of the citizens 
of the Commonwealth. 

The Center would be the organizational 
entity within the University of Massa- 
chusetts for the operation of Channel 
57 when awarded by the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission. 

Dean Redfern described two pending bills, H.326 with 
reference to repealing Fiscal Accountability and Autonomy; also 
H.3903 limiting the operation of Fiscal Accountability and Autonomy 
After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve and forward to the Legislature 
the following resolution. 

RESOLVED: The Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, more firmly convinced 
than ever, on the basis of continued ex- 
perience, as to the value and efficiency 
of fiscal accountability and autonomy to 
public institutions of higher education 
in the Commonwealth, reaffirms its unanimous 
opposition to repeal or to limitations upon 
this essential element of institutional 
management and growth. 

Discussion was held with reference to S.266 the Medical 
School Salary Relief bill. It was noted that this bill will pro- 
vide flexibility in securing professional staff for the Medical 
School. A motion was made and seconded, and it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve and forward to the Legislature 
the following resolution. 

RESOLVED: The Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts unanimously endorses S.266, 
a bill introduced by Senate President 
Maurice A. Donahue, to authorize the Board 
to establish salaries of the officers and 
members of the University Medical School. 
This legislation is absolutely essential 
if a first-class medical school is to be 



287' 



Educational 

Television 

Center 



Fiscal 

Accountability 
and Autonomy 



Salaries 

Medical 
School 



2878 



COMMITTEE 



Federal 
Grants 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

established by the Commonwealth and if 
the necessary quality of staff is to be 
obtained for the operation of the School 
and the training of medical students. 

The Board of Trustees expresses its 
appreciation for the support thus far 
given in planning the Medical School 
and urges enactment of this legislation 
as a means for effectively implementing 
the development and operation of the 
University Medical School. 

Dean Redfern described H.2988, which seeks to have all 
federal subventions and grants paid directly to the State Treasurer 
rather than to the University in the event of such payment. Dis- 
cussion with Chairman Kenneally of the Joint Federal Financial 
Assistance Committee indicated the intent of the Bill had not been 
to include the University of Massachusetts. Dean Redfern mentioned 
that the Legislature in amending the Appropriation Act last year 
specifically permitted the University to keep all overhead from 
Federal and other grants and contracts. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that the State Appropriation 
Act has had this same provision in it for the last few years. The 
University has been exempt. He stated Section 20 exempts the Uni- 
versity and other educational institutions from the effect of 
Section 8. 

Treasurer Johnson explained the manner of operation in 
receiving and administering grants, noting that if this bill went 
into effect, it would result in a "drying up" of grants as they are 
granted to support the research of faculty who are recognized in 
their field of scholarship. They are not given to the state. If 
H.2988 were enacted, the University could not administer the grants. 
After further discussion, a motion was made, seconded, and it was 
then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve and forward to the Legislature 
the following resolution. 

RESOLVED: The Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts strongly opposed H.2988 
which seeks to have all federal sub- 
ventions and grants paid directly to the 
State Treasurer. The effect of such a 
bill, in addition to complicating project 
proposals and grant agreements between 
the federal government and state insti- 
tutions of higher learning, would seriously 
weaken the ability of these institutions 
to conduct research, to meet the cost- 
sharing principle involved in federal grants, 



a 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to encourage service and publication 
functions, and to attract federal funds 
to Massachusetts. No other state in the 
nation, to the best of our knowledge, has 
such a provision affecting federal programs 
of assistance to public higher education. 

We also call attention to the fact that in 
a resolution of June 8, 1966, the Board of 
Higher Education strongly opposed similar 
legislation on the grounds such provisions 
would weaken the ability of public educa- 
tional institutions to compete for and 
obtain federal grants, weaken their ability 
to attract notable faculty, weaken their 
ability to conduct selected programs of 
educational quality at no added cost to the 
Commonwealth, and would cut off support for 
a number of graduate students. 

Furthermore, there is no possibility of 
building a quality Medical School program 
under such restrictions. 

Dean Redfern introduced a copy of a letter dated June 8, 
1966 to the committee from the Board of Higher Education in support 
of public higher education. There was particular reference to over- 
head allowances on research grants urging the General Court to con- 
tinue the policy of allowing the University and other public insti- 
tutions of higher education to retain and use such overhead. To 
inhibit the ability of the institutions to negotiate federal and 
foundation grants, would have the effect of diverting to other 
states funds which would ordinarily come into education in the 
Commonwealth. 

After discussion, the committee supported the position of 
the Board of Higher Education as outlined in the Chairman's communi- 
cation. Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they endorse the Resolve dated June 8, 1966 
of the Board of Higher Education. 

RESOLVED: The Board of Higher Education, charged with 
responsibility to coordinate and promote 
higher education in the Commonwealth, calls 
the attention of the General Court to the 
inadequate support of public higher educa- 
tion as provided in House Bill No. 3650. 
The original House Bill No. 1 contained 
severe reductions in dollar support from 
requested budgets. Such reductions would 
seriously jeopardize the present quality 



2879 



Board of 

Higher 

Education 



2880 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of collegiate education in Massachusetts, 
which even under current support levels 
is far below the national average. House 
No. 3650 does nothing to improve the levels 
of support for our institutions of higher 
learning . 

The Board of Higher Education, furthermore, 
strongly recommends deletion of a new 
proviso in H.3650 dealing with overhead 
allowances on research grants and with 
proviso that collegiate research founda- 
tions and building authority be required 
to meet obligations otherwise provided for 
by independent contract. 

These provisos weaken the ability of Massa- 
chusetts' institutions to compete for and 
obtain grants, weaken their ability to attract 
outstanding faculty with high research competence, 
and weaken their ability to conduct selected 
programs of educational quality at no added 
cost to the Commonwealth. Such provisions 
drastically alter operating patterns of many 
years standing among the institutions. The 
effect of such changes will be to blunt the 
initiative of faculty to seek outside grant 
support and will inhibit the ability of the 
institutions to negotiate federal and founda- 
tion grants, thus diverting to other states 
funds that would ordinarily come into the 
Commonwealth. 

The loss of overhead allowances to the insti- 
tutions would cut off support for a number 
of graduate students. Further, there seems 
no possibility of building a quality Uni- 
versity Medical School program with such 
restrictions. To our knowledge there is no 
other state in the nation that requires re- 
version of overhead allowances, which are 
left at the institutions to strengthen 
academic and research programs. 

The Board wishes to express its deep con- 
cern about the restrictive effect of these 
provisos upon the ability of public insti- 
tutions to engage in productive research. 
Further, it calls attention to the fact 
that the proviso on overhead allowances 
was inserted in House 3650 without con- 
sultation with the Board. This is con- 
trary to the statutory responsibility 
assigned to the Board to coordinate public 
higher education. 



COMMITTEE 



2881 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Board of Higher Education, therefore, 
urges members of the General Court to 
remove these crippling provisos now in 
H.3650, and to exert every possible 
effort to increase the necessary level 
of financial support to our institutions 
in order that they may continue to serve 
the needs of our students and citizens. 

A calendar of Hearings on bills relating to the Universitj 
for the 1967 session of the General Court had been supplied to 
members of the committee. Dean Redfern commented briefly on the 
current status of these bills. 

Dean Redfern testified in support of S.261 (Study of the 
Ability of the Commonwealth to Support Capital Development of 
Public Institutions of Higher Education in Decade Ahead) . He noted 
that the Advisory Council on Education would be willing to do such 
a study if the committee wished to consult with them. 

There was discussion of the Campus Center and its rela- 
tion to the University Program in Continuing Education, the com- 
munity and to student activities. 

Dean Redfern discussed the legislative slate for the 
March 8 session as listed on the calendar supplied, with particular 
reference to bills which required University position. (It was the 
sense of the meeting that a representative would be available to 
testify against repeal of the Fiscal Autonomy bill) . In the absence 
of Dean Soutter, the Director of Hospitals will testify on behalf of 
S.266. Appropriate representation will also be supplied in support 
of the S.267 bill, to establish ETV Center at the University at 
Amherst. It was the consensus to appear in opposition to bills 
H.516 and H.3911, also H.1978, on the basis that the responsibili- 
ties of the Board of Trustees are defined and the Board is already 
moving to complete their responsibilities and progress is being 
made with all practicable speed. Bill H.2720, which provides for 
no telephones in the dormitories without occupant's permission, 
received negative reaction from the committee, it being the con- 
tention that dormitories are available in which telephones are not 
standard, should a student wish to locate in such a building; how- 
ever, anyone who elects to reside in the dormitories in which 
phones are standard thus elects to have a telephone. 

Dean Redfern also discussed the March 13th legislative 
calendar as it pertains to the University. Bills H.326 and H.3903 
relate to repeal of fiscal autonomy It is planned to appear in 
opposition to H.326 and H.3903 and planned to appear in support 
of maintaining fiscal autonomy. 

There was discussion of Bill H.IO46 (to establish a Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Law School) . President Lederle spoke in 
support of this, stating it would seem practical to locate the 



Continuing 
Education 



2882 



COMMITTEE 



State 
Auditor ' s 
Report 



letic 

Teams 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

school in Amherst where library and other facilities are already 
established; also existing faculty could be utilized, thus keeping 
expenditures on a relatively economical basis. A study has been 
made and the President suggested making it available to the com- 
mittee since it demonstrates the need. It was felt advisable to 
work through the Board of Higher Education and thus come up with a 
positive position. 

Bill H.2852 - calling for extension of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston facilities was discussed. Dean Redfern 
stated it would mean trebling of the facilities. No resolution is 
necessary at this time. 

The State Auditor's Report was discussed. Treasurer 
Johnson supplied information to the committee on a number of items 
listed. He pointed out that no questions whatsoever were raised by 
the auditor concerning misuse or misappropriation of any funds 
although nearly $50 million was handled by the University in the 
1966 fiscal year. Instead, the Treasurer reported the auditor 
chose to focus on policy questions which are properly the concern 
of the Board of Trustees. 

The auditor continues to challenge decisions which 
have in some cases been certified by legislative enactments. 

President Lederle informed the committee on the 
results of a conference with the State Auditor as of February 17, 
1967. 

The committee was informed that the administration 
had just obtained copies of the back-up sheets from the Budget 
Bureau and is in the process of evaluating the implications for the 
University's operations. 

It was reported that the request of General Maginnis 
for consideration of a name change from "Redmen" to "Minutemen" 
for the University athletic teams had been considered by the 
Athletic Council which did not look favorably on the suggestion. 
The proposal is now under consideration by the Alumni Council. A 
final report will be given later. 



The meeting was adj< 



at 12:30 p.m. 




Secret 



UfL 

Robert J. McCartne: 



tary, 



Board of 




ees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

March 9, 1967, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 

Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Maginnis, 
Plimpton; Provost Tippo, Chancellor 
Ryan, Miss Coulter. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean Hunsherger, Dean Tunis, Pro- 
fessor Pao L, Cheng. 



The meeting was called to order by the Chairman at 



10:45 a.m. 

Chairman Troy welcomed Trustee Maginnis to the Committee. 

Provost Tippo stated that it had been expected to submit 
Tenure Recommendations to the meeting, but due to the great number 
of them, their preliminary review and preparation had been delayed 
in order to permit adequate consideration. 

Dean Hunsberger presented to each member of the committee 
a copy of a summary entitled HEADSHIP OF ECONOMICS. He briefly 
summarized that Professor Gamble stepped aside as Head of Economics 
in February of 1964. In December 1966, a distinguished 3-man 
committee visited the campus as consultants. They suggested four- 
teen persons as possible candidates for the department headship. 
After consideration, five were selected as eminently qualified for 
our needs. 

Dean Hunsberger reviewed the list of five names, their 
positions, qualifications, reputations, the distinguished records 
they have established, and their current salaries. He stated that, 
regrettably in each case, after time-consuming negotiations and 
interviews, each candidate has declined appointment to the Economic 
Headship due to superior offers elsewhere. 

Dean Hunsberger then distributed a description of a 
candidate for the Head of Economics, currently a Professor at 
Purdue. He described the background and accomplishments of this 
candidate. Dean Hunsberger felt it would take $27,000 to get him 
and hoped to be able to make an offer in that area. His reputation 
as an except! onally fine teacher was established and affirmed by 
all persons contacted. The candidate has stated he did not wish 
to be considered further, however, since he has decided to accept 
a visiting professorship at Harvard, combined with collaboration 
on a (third) book. 



S3 



Tenure 
Recommendation 



Headship 
Economics 



2884 



COMMITTEE 



Headship 
Psychology 



Deanship 
Business 
Adrnini strati on 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion encompassing motivation for change. 
Dean Hunsberger stressed (l) remuneration, (2) colleagues. 

Trustee Plimpton, as President of Amherst College, 
offered to be of assistance in this difficult matter of securing 
high quality faculty, with the thought that the area is a 
particularly appealing one to many persons of outstanding calibre. 

Dean Hunsberger commended the cooperation of the depart- 
ment, in particular Professor Bruce Morris, for assistance in 
knitting together the department, pending the selection of a Head. 

Next, Dean Hunsberger circulated a paper entitled HEAD- 
SHIP OF PSYCHOLOGY. It was noted that Professor Meet has resigned 
as head of the Psychology Department effective June 1967. As a re- 
sult of the visit of a team of consultants in July of 1966: Clark 
of Rochester; Cook of Colorado; Pfaffman of Rockefeller; Solomon 
of Pennsylvania) four men were considered for the headship of this 
department. The result of interviews with these men was in each 
case the same. In spite of our best offer, each re jected our ■ of fer 
with regrets. 

The description of another candidate for the Head of 
Psychology, who had been an administrator since 1962, was then sub- 
mitted to the committee. After discussion, Dean Hunsberger advised 
the committee that this man had called at 9:15 this morning to 
advise he elected to remain in his present position. 

Dr. Plimpton felt that when a man reached the $25-330,000 
salary bracket, additional increment is not most important. Other 
considerations such as teaching load, released time, become of in- 
creasing interest. It was conceded the headship carries a reduced 
teaching load, but there are many extra hours of work due to ad- 
ministrative responsibilities. 

Dean Hunsberger left the meeting. 

Provost Tippo described the search for the Deanship in 
Business Administration. He stated the selection committee has 
been one of the finest committees with which he has ever worked. 
As a result eight candidates were considered. Four have visited the 
campus. Provost Tippo described several of the men interviewed and 
the reactions of those involved. Biographical data on Joseph 
William McGuire, present Dean and Professor of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics of the University of Kansas, was presented. 

Provost Tippo introduced Professor Pao L. Cheng of the 
School of Business Administration and a member of the selection 
committee. Professor Cheng described the qualifications of the 
proposed candidate and the committee's enthusiastic recommendation 
of him for Deanship of the School of Business Administration. Pro- 
fessor Cheng read from the Annual Report of the University of 
Kansas to indicate the calibre of this candidate. He described the 



■1 



COMMITTEE 



II 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



philosophy of Dr. McGuire, with special stress on the forward- 
looking programs he has instituted. It was noted that Dean McGuire 
has made the programs at Kansas considerably more challenging in 
the hope they will provide personal challenge to the students. 
The nature of the business school is such the students seldom 
participate in the intellectual life of the University. Professor 
Cheng feels that Dr. McGuire has a dedicated interest in improving 
this attitude in the Business School so that it will become 
competitive with other schools on campus. 

Professor Cheng commented that Dean McGuire is a most 
dedicated person. He has no objection to spending as much as a 
third of his time traveling, whether to attract students to the 
University program by visiting high schools, or by gaining the in- 
terest of business establishments. It was Professor Cheng's view 
that this man is the most progressive and scholarly Business School 
Dean in the nation today. 

Chairman Troy stated that recruitment of better students 
and involving them in the intellectual life of the campus was an 
aspect which he found very persuasive. 

It was the consensus that Dean McGuire should be invited 
to the campus and have the opportunity to meet with the committee. 

There was discussion of appropriate salary and the matter 
was left to the Executive Committee. Professor Cheng then left 
the meeting. 

President Lederle supplied to the members of the 
committee, copies of a summary of enrollments at the six New 
England State Universities, under the New England Board of Higher 
Education regional arrangement. It is clear from this that 
Connecticut is taking the vast number of students from other states 
at in-state rates; Massachusetts is receiving very few out-of- 
state students. The President stated the New England Board of 
Higher Education has reviewed this; there is a feeling that one 
reason for the limited number of exchange students is that many 
regional programs do not permit entrance at the freshman year. 
Students who planned to transfer to another state institution 
later rarely do, as they have formed associations they wish to 
continue. The Presidents of the six New England State Universi- 
ties are recommending to their respective Boards of Trustees that, 
for a trial period of three years, admission for all "undergraduate 
regional programs should be at the freshman year at in-state or 
resident tuition rates. A continuing review of these programs is 
planned. Transfer privileges into regional programs would be 
available, even though the student did not start with the freshman 
year. President Lederle suggested the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy support the proposal. 



288 r 



Regional 

Undergraduate 

Program 






COMMITTEE 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion, which included assurance that out- 
of-state students would not be usurping space needed by Massachu- 
setts students. President Lederle stated that the latest migration 
figures show we export 5800 students to public institutions in 
other states and import about 800. Trustee Haigis held that a pro- 
gram similar to the Amherst College "Lord Jeff" program for 
example, (a boy and girl from each state: selected on the basis of 
leadership qualities, athletic ability, etc.) has many benefits, 
including affording opportunity for students to broaden their 
associations and learn from each other. 

Chairman Troy called for an explanation of the scope and 
possibilities of the proposal. Particular interest was expressed 
in the regulation which makes it necessary for the student to elect 
his course of study upon entrance in order to be eligible for the 
in-state tuition rate. If there should be a change of course after 
original election, out-of-state tuition rate would apply. 

President Lederle invited Dean of Admission and Records 
Tunis to explain the details of the program. Dean Tunis referred 
to descriptive pamphlets outlining the programs at each of the six 
cooperating schools. He stated the organization was not as yet 
ideally integrated. In theory, each of the six universities admits 
students from out-of-state at in-state tuition rates, to register 
for programs of study which are not offered in their home state. 
Theoretically, the arrangement would mean a university which had a 
strong; course, with good student registration would allow out-of- 
state students whose state university had no such course to attend. 
Thus duplication of selected courses at neighboring universities 
would be eliminated. This would allow strengthening of remaining 
courses. 

Dean Tunis said it is the soundest academic approach to 
have the program begin at the freshman level. He supported the 
theory of the program, but stated further direction is needed in 
establishing the actual courses offered. He said this was the 
feeling of the six state admissions officers. 

President Lederle suggested the possibility of appointing 
two of our Trustees to join with two Trustees of the University of 
Connecticut to see whether some arrangement could be worked out 
whereby we could work to eliminate one program which they would 
assume, and we could expand one of ours and allow them to eliminate 
the equivalent one. There was discussion of special areas of in- 
terest in this regard. The peripheral effects were considered. 

The committee continued the discussion and expanded into 
consideration of increasing the 5% out-of-state admissions ratio as 
established by the Trustees to 10$. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 



II 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees for 
a trial period of 1968-69 through 1970-71 
admission for all undergraduate regional 
programs may he at the freshman year at 
in-state tuition rates: 

that transfer privileges into regional pro- 
grams will still be available for qualified 
upperclassmen, as at present; 

that the operation of the regional programs 
should be continually reviewed, with a 
major re-evaluation during 1970-71. 

Chancellor Ryan discussed the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston Constitution and after an exchange of comments between 
members of the committee, it was agreed that the Chancellor would 
bring the committee's point of view back to his faculty. 

Provost Tippo submitted for the committee's consideration 
a change in the Constitution of the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst Faculty Senate which had been approved by vote at a meet- 
ing of the general faculty in accordance with the constitution. 
This is now presented for Board of Trustee approval. He explained 
that at the time this motion was framed, Section (m) of Article 8 
established the Senate Review Committee. Subsequently Article (k), 
having to do with the Fine Arts Council, was deleted leaving the 
Review Committee as Section (l). The motion is presented as 
originally framed with the intent that the Review Committee be 
abolished. Its functions will be taken over by the Rules Committee 
Accordingly, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTEEK To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they delete Section (m), Article 8 from 
the Constitution of the Faculty Senate. 



2887 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of T 




tees 



U of M at 
Boston 
Senate 
Constitution 

Amherst 
Faculty 
Senate 
Constitution 



2888 



COMMITTEE 



Continuing 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

March 16, 1967, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman pro tern Lyons; Presi- 
dent Lederle, Trustees Emerson, 
Haigis, Pumphret, Troy; Provost 
TIppo, Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer 
Johnson, Dean Redfern, Dean 
Gagnon, Secretary McCartney, 
Miss Coulter. 

In the absence "of the Chairman, Trustee Lyons was 
appointed Chairman pro tern. 

The meeting was called to order at 10:40 a.m. 

Following presentation by Dean Redfern of the report of 
the University of Massachusetts and Continuing Education, it was 
noted that prompt action is urged if the University is to be in a 
position, with qualified staff, to play an influential role in the 
field of continuing education and community services in the years 
ahead. 

The distinction between continuing and adult education 
and extension services was noted. Continuing and adult education 
is the formal, organized system of studies held on (or off) campus 
and conducted for either degree or non-degree purposes for those 
other than regularly enrolled students. The concept includes con- 
ferences, workshops, institutes, seminars, short courses and per- 
haps evening courses. Extension and community service is a form of 
applying educational resources toward the solution of problems or 
issues; stressing application of knowledge toward specific results 
and accomplishments on the problems of a particular community, 
neighborhood or region. 

Chancellor Ryan was invited to discuss the effect of this 
program on the Boston campus. He stated that at the moment he did 
not believe we should have two separate organizations, though Boston 
would have substantial differences in program offered and the way 
it is offered. The Chancellor said the framework proposed by Dean 
Redfern anticipates and is broad enough to permit development of a 
Boston program. 

Trustee Pumphret said there should be a coordinator who 
will correlate the present programs and outline costs. After 
further discussion, motion was made, seconded and it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2889 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the following items: 

1. The principle that programs in con- 
tinuing education and extension be 
based upon the schools, colleges and 
departments of the University. This 
is analogous to the present Graduate 
School structure. 

2. The principle that the programs in 
this area be statewide in scope, 
with opportunities for cooperative 
actions with other institutions and 
associations to implement this 
principle. 

3. The principle that University pro- 
grams be of a university level only. 

4-. A Division of Continuing Education be 
established under a University Ad- 
visory Committee, headed by a Dean of 
Continuing Educationfjuho will be 
assisted initially by a Director of 
Non-Resident Studies and a Director 
of Community Services (together with 
necessary clerical staff). In the 
future a Director of Conferences and 
Institutes may be requested to supple- 
ment the staff^ 

5. The principle that the State has an 
obligation to assist in support of 
continuing education as a public 
responsibility. 

6. The assessment of a $2 continuing 
education fee for enrollment in all 
courses or conferences conducted 
under the auspices of the Division to 
help defray cost of space, facilities 
and services provided to the Division 
by the Student Union-Campus Center, 
or by UMass-Boston. 

Over-ceiling appointments were discussed. It was said 
there must be careful and tactful consideration of this matter. 
Guidelines must be established to be used in the extended search 
for top quality personnel, specifically the Headship in Economics. 
Trustee Troy briefed the committee on the so far disappointing re- 
sults. He stated the field of Economics is a particularly diffi- 
cult one in which to find the kind of man we seek, due in some 
measure to the ceiling imposed on salary. Discussion of 



Over-Ceiling 
Appointments 



COMMITTEE 



Head of 
Economics 



Dean, School 
of Business 
Administration 



Research 

Computing 

Center 

Charges 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

alternatives, including finding bright young men rather than already 
acclaimed top men in this field, brought forth the comment that 
the headship set the pattern, influenced the calibre of faculty 
attracted, as well as the quality and number of the students to the 
course. 

Further discussion encompassed the 2% inclusion, the 1% 
overage; it was noted that on the basis of the 1% schedule, 11 
people could be acquired and to date we have used this emergency 
provision for only 3 members of the faculty. Provost Tippo noted 
that the Economics Department needs a senior ma-tt y and this would 
appear to require a salary in the $26, 000- $30, 000 range, according 
to national salary figures. The peripheral advantages considered 
by potential candidates, aside from the dollar figure, i.e., 
geographical area, academic associates, etc. were commented upon. 

Provost Tippo introduced biographical data on Dean Joseph 
McGuire of the University of Kansas. He noted his special 
accomplishments and abilities; also the enthusiastic endorsement of 
the selection committee of the School of Business Administration. 
It is proposed to invite Dean McGuire to the campus at a time when 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy may have an oppor- 
tunity to meet him. President Lederle urged quick action, stating 
he would like to have at least one deanship filled. He also stated 
he had been impressed with this candidate. It was suggested that 
the Provost could bring Dean McGuire to Boston to facilitate meet- 
ing with the committee and other members of the Board. 

Chairman Troy stated the importance of establishing 
guidelines to aid Dean Hunsberger when searching for department 
heads. Provost Tippo submitted a confidential survey of salaries 
throughout the country, which indicated the ranges. It appeared 
to be the consensus that the salary limit should not impose a re- 
striction in this instance, and the committee indicated its willing- 
ness to extend the range. 

Treasurer Johnson commented on the schedule of charges 
for supplies and services of the Research Computing Center. It was 
noted that members of the faculty and students in some instances 
need not pay, so that the computer will not be self-sustaining even 
with the proposed charges. Treasurer Johnson asserted these 
charges are primarily what other Universities levy and about one- 
half the commercial charges. After discussion, motion v/as made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they establish the schedule of charges (Docu- 
ment 67-055) for supplies and services for 
the Research Computing Center and to deposit 
all income received on account of such 
supplies and services in the Research Com- 
puting Trust Fund to be disbursed for the 
support of the Research Computing Center in 
accordance with the approved budgets. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Lederle was asked to preside. He introduced 
the subject of a Counselling and Orientation Fund for the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston and asked Chancellor Ryan to 
describe the proposal. 

Chancellor Ryan recommended a fee of $15.00. The 
Chancellor described the purpose of this fee, which is proposed 
to be called the "pre-registration fee" as follows: 

It will provide a new program for entering students prior 
to enrollment which will 

(1) assess their special academic strengths 
and weaknesses 

(2) increase their understanding of the Uni- 
versity requirements and curriculum 

(3) assist them to plan their academic program 
and accommodate their special need for 
study time, travel time, work time and 
other essential factors 

(4-) determine the appropriate level of entry 

to language, science and mathematics courses 

(5) improve their comprehension of study habits 
and performance standards necessary to 
success in the University 

(6) generally acquaint them with the students, 
faculty and program of the University. 

Chancellor Ryan said he felt the performance of students 
would be improved; decision making of admissions office will be 
improved; it will permit spring testing and arranging of programs 
and thus give students a chance to discuss how to prepare for the 
first year in college. 

Chancellor Ryan circulated a memorandum which included 
a listing of the General Program Requirements for 1967-68. 

There was general discussion. The operation of the plan 
was described by Dean Gagnon. It was stated this $15.00 fee will 
apply only to new students in Boston. Motion was thereupon made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
877 of the Acts of 1965, to establish a 
Pre-Registration Fee in the amount of 
fifteen dollars ($15.00) to be assessed 



2891 



Pre-registra- 
tion Fee - 
UM at Boston 



2 



COMMITTEE 



Amherst 
Student 
Union Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



to all new students entering the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts - Boston commencing 
with those entering in the fall of 1967 
to be billed and payable at the time the 
student confirms intention to matriculate, 
said fee to be held in a non-refundable 
trust fund entitled Pre-Regi strati on Fee - 
New Students - Boston and disbursed under 
the direction of the Chancellor for the 
purposes of providing a program or programs 
of introduction to the University of Massa- 
chusetts - Boston including the supplying 
of services and materials incidental or 
ancillary to classes and courses, student 
advising, counselling, testing, placement, 
student life and other orientation pro- 
grams and activities that may from time to 
time be determined by the President and 
the Chancellor to be necessary or de- 
sirable. The Orientation and Counselling 
Fee - Amherst will not be assessed students 
at Boston. 

There was presented to the Executive Committee the pro- 
posal to increase the Student Union fee, at Amherst to $15.00 per 
semester, the undergraduate students having already approved this 
advance in fee. President Lederle noted that the Seniors are 
exempted because they will not be using this enlarged campus 
facility, it will not be completed until they have graduated. 

It was stated that the adoption of the increase at this 
time will enable students to plan for the fall semester. At some 
later time the Student Union Fee may be turned over to the Building 
Authority by vote of the Trustees to complete the amortization of 
the Union and the Campus Center. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
effective with the fall semester 1967, the 
Student Union Fee - Amherst, is revised and 
increased to fifteen dollars ($15.00) per 
semester to be payable by all undergraduate 
students except those classified as "special" 
by reason of part-time matriculation and said 
fee shall not be waived for those students 
who might otherwise under University regulations 
receive waiver of tuition provided that the 
standard University policy pertaining to re- 
funds shall apply in like manner as to tuition 
where applicable and provided further that 
the Student Union Fee for academic periods of 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

less than a full semester shall be at the 
rate of $1.00 per week, provided that stu- 
dents graduating in the Class of 1968 will 
be assessed $10.00 per semester. 

Trustee Pumphret, as Chairman of the Finance Committee, 
introduced a letter from Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. investment 
counsel, in which they outlined the advances in operating costs 
and the resultant increase in costs of handling the University 
account. These conditions bring about the need for an increase 
in the fee. Trustee Pumphret stated these people work for five 
universities and the fee charged any of the five institutions. 
It was, therefore, recommended that the increased fees be approved, 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve an increase in the 
investment counsel fees for Standish, 
Ayer and Wood, Inc., from $1,000 per 
year to $2,000 per year for the Endow- 
ment Fund and from $500 per year to 
$1,000 per year for the Operating Fund 
to be paid from the income from each 
fund effective with the period commencing 
February 1, 1967. 

President Lederle submitted a vote authorizing transfers 
between subsidiary accounts. He stated the Provost and others had 
hoped to be allowed transfers for library purposes but funds were 
not available and this item had, therefore, been deleted. Motion 
was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the following transfers be- 
tween subsidiary accounts: 



From: 330-4-4-4-15 
To: 3304-44-03 



From: 
To: 



1350-01-06 
1350-01-15 



From: 
To: 



1350-01-09 
1350-01-05 



Cooperative Wildlife $700.00 
Research Unit 

To provide for the ser- $700.00 
vices of an assistant- 
ship part time. 

Janitor Supplies $3,500.00 
Equipment - To provide $3,500.00 
a specialized piece of 
equipment for in- 
struction in physical 
education 

Farm and Grounds $2,800.00 
Clothing - To provide $2,800.00 
protective clothing for 
volunteer firefighters. 



2803 



Increase - 
Investment 
Counsel Fee 



Transfers 

Subsidiary 

Accounts 



2894 



COMMITTEE 

Federal 
Grants 

Treasurer to 
Enter Into 
Agreement or 
Contracts 



Amherst Fire 
Department 
versus 
UM/Amherst 



Fire 
Academy 



Trustee 
Liability 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson explained that many routine documents, 
including applications for federal grants to promote the objectives 
of the University, require authorized signature. The vote 
currently in use needs modernizing and it was thereupon moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that under the authority provided by 
Sections 3A and 11 of Chapter 75 of 
the Ganeral Laws, the Treasurer of the 
University of Massachusetts is hereby 
delegated the authority to enter into 
agreement ox contracts with the federal 
government or agencies thereof, in- 
cluding the application for federal 
grants, where such agreements or con- 
tracts will promote the objectives of 
the University and are consistent with 
other policies, rules and regulations 
established by the Trustees. 

Treasurer Johnson apprised the Executive Committee of the 
need for a viable arrangement with the Town of Amherst on fire pro- 
tection. He stated studies have been made and it is very clear the 
fire department in Amherst must be increased, not only because of 
the growth of the University, but also due to the growth of the 
town. The selectmen met with President Lederle and have worked out 
an arrangement where the University will supply a fire truck and 
will hire additional fire and security guards and volunteer to be 
called in the event of need in the town. 

In addition to the foregoing, there is presently some 
consideration being given by the Legislature to the establishment 
of a Fire Academy. This might be set up on the Amherst campus. 
The equipment and manpower would also aid the town. This would 
enable the University to have equipment on campus for protection of 
our own buildings. There ensued discussion as to how this would 
operate. It was stated 

1. There would be no academic credit 

2. This would not be a University budget request 

3. Firefighters around the state would be active in it 

Dean Redfern will make a presentation to the committee. 

President Lederle submitted for committee consideration 
a matter which Trustee Lambson had brought up. Trustee Lambson ex- 
pressed concern about liability, occasioned by the assumption of 
the duties of a Trustee of the University. He had supplied the 
President with a sample insurance policy which he had secured to 
cover this possibility. No action was deemed necessary by the 
committee . 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Emerson was invited by the President to describe 
the meeting with the Governor which had immediately preceded the 
Executive Committee meeting and had been attended by Trustee 
Emerson, the President and the Treasurer. 

Trustee Emerson said this was an informal meeting to 
bring the Governor up to date on what the University is doing, 
what is planned, both short and fairly long range, and to acquaint 
him with the problem of the Boston site, as well as the land for 
the Medical School. 

Trustee Emerson commented that the Governor had some 
things on his mind also including the falsely rumored dominant 
role the University is assuming on the Board of Higher Education 
and a ten-year program to be worked up by a long-range tax study 
commission. 

The President advised the Governor we would top off at 
3,500-3,600 in the fall of 1968 at Boston, pending a permanent 
campus, which will take at least three years to build after the 
site is determined. The Governor had reflected a feeling of un- 
easiness about the lack of decision thus far on the Boston site. 

It was an entirely harmonious forty-minute session, 
according to Trustee Emerson, and it is hoped to have another such 
meeting in six to eight weeks. 

There v/as an exchange of views and discussion with 
reference to adding impetus to the decision-making process on the 
Boston site. Trustee Haigis commented that the Mayor seemed more 
interested in the possibility of an in-Boston location for the 
University, on the basis of a limited 4-5-acre need as compared to 
the former plan for 150 acres. He said 7 sites are now being 
viewed, of which 3 seem quite good. 

There was general acceptance of Trustee Pumphret's 
suggestion that one meeting be devoted entirely to the subject of 
the Boston site selection. It is planned to have a meeting of the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee on April 12 in Boston. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of 



stees 



2895 



Meeting with 
Governor 



Boston 
Site 



2896 



COMMITTEE 



Evaluation 
of Potential 
Sites, UM at 
Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

April 12, 1967, 10:30 a.m., Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 

Watertown, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Crowley, Emerson, 
Gordon and Maginnis; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Gagnon and 
Mr. Frank O'Brien of UM at Boston; 
Mr. Pietro Belluschi, Architectural 
Consultant; Messrs. Sasaki, Galehouse, 
Alexander, Thomas and Minervino of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay, Inc. 



The meeting was called to order at 10:35 a.m. by Chairman 



Haigis. 



Chancellor Ryan outlined the procedure agreed upon at a 
previous meeting. This involved evaluation of seven potential sites 
for location of a permanent campus for UM at Boston. 

Representatives of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. 
together with Mr. Frank O'Brien of the UM at Boston staff touched 
on various criteria affecting these sites. Mr. Alexander spoke 
first for Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. He noted that the 
agreed upon figure for a campus of 15,000 students was 3,333,000 
sq. ft. of space. This would include space for instruction, office 
purposes, research, library, general services. Options which might 
affect the ultimate space usage upwards or downwards were discussed 
including the number of full versus part-time students; also whether 
or not there was to be programming of instruction into evening 
hours. 

There followed a lengthy discussion in which the criteria 
of size, location, development potential, economic feasibility and 
general availability were applied to the following seven sites: 
Highland Park, Governor Shirley site, Columbia Point, Copley Square- 
Park Square, South Station-Turnpike, Fort Point Channel, Naval 
Annex. 

After thorough evaluation of all of the factors involved, 
it was moved, seconded and unanimously 



:OMMITTEE 



289? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To go into executive Session for the pur- 
pose of discussing two prime sites which 
might be recommended to the Board of 
Trustees as first choice (with or without 
designation of first alternate) as the 
future location of the permanent campus 
of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston. 

After further lengthy and detailed discussion concerning 
the application of specific criteria to the sites, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED: To come out of executive session for the 
purpose of declaring a luncheon recess. 

The committee reconvened at 1:15 p.m. 

Chancellor Ryan pointed out that the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston will require additional space this year in 
order to accommodate its programs. Mr. Frank O'Brien has been 
working with the firm of Drummey, Rosane and Anderson to obtain 
cost estimates for the space requirements and to develop specifi- 
cations for bids. The sum of $400,000.00 is now available in the 
budget for rental purposes. 

Buildings involved in the proposed expansion include 
(l) the Sawyer Building (entire); (2) the Salada Tea Building 
(3rd floor); (3) 8th floor - Liberty Mutual Building and (4) Armory 
directly across the street from the main building at 100 Arlington 
Street. 

The Chancellor indicated that the projects would go to 
bid as soon as the specifications were completed. It was pointed 
out that, on the basis of an estimated 3500 students, the Univer- 
sity at Boston would approach approximately one-third of the 
normal ideal square footage space formula, providing the space 
mentioned above is obtained. 

After further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that, contingent upon approval of the 
State Superintendent of Buildings, the 
Treasurer of the University, Kenneth 
W. Johnson, be and he hereby is authorized 
to enter into a tenant-at-will agreement 
with Thomas J. Diab, owner, in accordance 
with the proposal of Mr. Diab dated 
March 24, 1967, on file in the Treasurer's 
Office, for the occupancy of approximately 



Lease of 
Temporary 
Space UM 
at Boston 



2898 



COMMITTEE 



Award of 
Contracts - 
DM at Boston 



Contract to 
E. H. Sheldon 
Co. 



Contract to 
James Con- 
struction Co. 



Residence 
Halls and 
Dining 
Facilities 
for 1970 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



7900 square feet of space on the third 
floor of the Salada Building located 
at 330 Stuart Street, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 

The Treasurer reported that satisfactory bids had been 
received for renovations and the installation of fixed equipment 
at the University at Boston. After brief discussion and upon 
motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the award of a con- 
tract for furnishing and installing 
science laboratory equipment, Renova- 
tions UM/B Phase II, Project No. 67-3, 
Contract No. 1, Federal Project Mass. 
4-1691, to E. H. Sheldon Co. in the 
amount of $200,016.00 including 
alternate No. 1 laboratory furniture. 

It was also 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they award the contract for general 
construction contract, Phase II Renova- 
tions UM/B, Project No. 67-3, Contract 
No. .2, Federal Project Mass. 4-1691 to 
James Construction Co. in the amount of 
$507,114.00 including Alternate No. 1, 
additional plumbing, Alternate No. 2, 
installation of still and sterilizer, 
Alternate No. 3, auditorium lighting 
and sound system, Alternate No. 4, in- 
stallation of 208 volt panels and feeders, 
and Alternate No. 5, relighting sixth 
floor areas. 

The Treasurer stated that a memorandum had been received 
from the Deanof Students stressing the urgency for providing addi- 
tional residence hall and dining facilities for September, 1970. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that it request the University Building 
Authority to commence a design study for 
two residence halls for 1400 students to 
be completed and available for occupancy 
by September, 1970 and to be located so , 
that about one-half those housed could eat 
with North Dining Commons and the other 
half in the South Dining Commons. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer described a proposal made by Miss Ruth 
Mclntire for the donation of a land tract between lj and 2 acres 
adjoining the University campus to the southwest of Butterfield 
dormitory and south of the Apiary. The condition of this gift 
would be that it be maintained by the University as an undisturbed 
wildlife sanctuary. In exchange, Miss Mclntire would request the 
University to deed to her a 100 foot strip across the southern end 
of its woodland to the south of Butterfield residence hall. 

The Treasurer noted the desirability, as one phase of this ex- 
change, of acquiring the present Mclntire residential tract of 
approximately .94 acres together with dwelling. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Treasurer be authorized to enter 
into negotiations for the Ruth Mclntire 
house (63 Clark Street) Amherst. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that a tract of land consisting 
of 24.7 acres, the property of William and Louise Sheldon, said 
property located in Amherst and Hadley, had been appraised inde- 
pendently at $55,000.00 and $40,000.00. The University has an 
option to acquire the property at the sum of $49,000.00. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that, in accordance with Chapter 590 
Acts of 1966 Item 8067-69, authorizing 
the Trustees of the University to acquire 
land, or land with buildings thereon, by 
purchase or by eminent domain under 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws, for the 
further development of the University; in- 
dependent appraisals of the value of the 
land and buildings, if any, having been 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers 
and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
that the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, a portion, 
24.7 acres more or less, of the property of 
William and Louise Sheldon located in Amherst 
and Hadley, Massachusetts adjacent to and 
west of parcels 4 and 6 of Page 8A of the 
Amherst Town Atlas (1964) and that the pur- 
chase price for said property be Forty-Nine 
Thousand ($49,000.00) dollars. 



2899 



Land 

Acquisition 

Amherst 



Mclntire 
Property 



Sheldon 
Property 



2900 



Naming of 
Buildings - 
Petition of 
Senator Parker 



COMMITTEE 



Other 
Business 



Petition 
for Hearing 



Meeting with 
Town of 
Amherst 
Officials 
with respect 
to fire 
protection 
problem 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President reported the gist of a petition by Senator 
Parker that some future building be named for a late, distinguished 
citizen of the Commonwealth, the Honorable Christian Herter. The 
committee responded favorably to this suggestion. No specific de- 
termination was made at this time pending further study to identify 
an appropriate facility for this purpose. 

President Lederle informed the committee that he had re- 
ceived a letter suggesting that a future building or memorial room 
within a building be named for Professor Emeritus Reuben 
Trippensee. Pending further review and study, no action was taken 
on this matter. 

It was reported that a few representatives of the Massa- 
chusetts State Employees Association had visited Chairman Haigis, 
requesting a meeting with the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to 
air certain grievances. After brief discussion, it was decided to 
defer this hearing in view of upcoming employee elections involving 
designation of an employee bargaining unit. At a later date this 
matter may be considered by the Executive Committee. 

The committee agreed that it would be desirable to meet 
at an early date with Amherst town officials, Fire Chief Doherty, 
a representative of the University Building Authority and other 
persons as appropriate in an executive session to review and clarify 
certain misunderstandings with respect to the University's policies 
and practices on fire protection. Accordingly, the Secretary will 
call a meeting of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to meet 
with the aforementioned parties at 10:00 a.m. on Monday, April 17, 
1967. 

The meeting was adjpurned at 2:20 p.m. 

(\l. c 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board o: 



rustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
April 17, 1967, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, Amherst, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson, Gordon, 
Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Miss Coulter. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : From the Town of Amherst: Messrs. 
Torrey, MacLeod, Keedy, Markert, 
Skillings, Fire Chief Doherty, Howes. 
From the University: Messrs. Redfern, 
Grady, Marchant, Goetzel, Field. Also: 
Mr. Glynn of Stubbins Associates. 

Chairman Haigis opened the meeting, expressing the general 
desire of the University to cooperate with the Town of Amherst, 
stating although there has been some difference in dialogue on the 
question of fire protection, it now seems advisable for the Town 
and University officials to get together with members of the Build- 
ings and Grounds Committee to discuss the problem. 

Treasurer Johnson described the Fire Needs Committee of 
the town which is composed of representatives from Amherst College, 
the University and private citizens. This committee prepared a 
report last December, which alleged that there were inadequacies in 
the University fire protection program and recommended that steps be 
taken to improve the situation. These included supplying a new 
thousand gallon pumper fire truck for the use of the town, as well 
as having additional fire and security guards available at the Uni- 
versity, who could also be used as call firemen for the Town. It 
had been felt progress was being made, until a widely publicized 
press interview with the Fire Chief indicated otherwise. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that the charges of inadequacies ir 
the construction of residence halls erected by the Building 
Authority had created parental concern for the safety of students 
housed there. 

After discussion, Chief Doherty stated the position he 
took was not related to the size of the Town fire department, nor 
to the proposed Fire Academy, nor was it part of any strategy to 
force immediate action. The entire press interview, he said, was 
"spontaneous." His reactions flowed from what he termed "frustra- 
tion" at obtaining results. 

The Chief said the basic University problem related to 
fire protection is that he has not been able to find any single 
person responsible for making final decisions . He said the build- 
ings are superior buildings, built to codes; but, although legal, 
they are built to meet a minimum of fire safety standards. They 
are, however, generally superior to what universities and colleges 



2901 



Fire 

Protection 
Town - 
University 



Fire Needs 
Committee 



2902 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

throughout the country are constructing. The Chief stated he must, 
however, look at the kind and amount of building usage and not just 
the structure itself. 

Fire Chief Doherty went on to describe areas of concern tc 
him, which included fire discipline training of students; location 
of fire hydrants; standpipes; and the need for a continuing overall 
review of fire safety procedures, especially in view of the antici- 
pated major building expansion. 

Mr. Gerald Grady, Business Manager for the University, 
said the differences of opinion are actually a conflict only in 
technology; the experts do not agree. He outlined efforts made to 
work with town committees. He repeated that experts themselves did 
not agree on the effectiveness of the measures under discussion; 
standpipes, elevators, evacuation drills. Mr. Grady expressed the 
opinion that much of Chief Doherty 1 s dissatisfaction stems from the 
difference in organization between the "uniformed services" and a 
university. Mr. Doherty' s experience in the uniformed services is 
channeled to deal with a single source of authority. A university 
has a totally different organization plan. Mr. Grady felt very 
strongly that the newspaper interview given by Chief Doherty was 
ill advised and harmful. 

President Lederle added that last fall he and Chief 
Doherty had what appeared to be an entirely satisfactory conference, 
with the understanding that if further difficulties should arise 
the Chief would advise the President. Until this time, except for 
the newspaper reports, the President has been unaware the Chief had 
experienced further difficulty in getting decisions. 

Chief Doherty stated that another matter of minor cost 
became quite irritating. It was his recommendation, endorsed by 
the Rating Association, that a direct phone line be installed to the 
fire station. After protracted delay the line was finally installed 
He noted that Amherst College had previously complied. 

Treasurer Johnson stated the University policy had always 
been to call the Fire Department direct. Thus, it was considered 
that a direct line was in fact operative. However, when it became 
clear that a different kind of line was required, it was immediately 
installed. 

The Chief went on to describe an instance where a Uni- 
versity policeman borrowed a smoke ejector from the town Fire De- 
partment to clear a dormitory after a mattress fire. His department 
had not been notified. He responded, not by loaning the smoke 
ejector, but by sending apparatus. 

Mr. Goetzel, University Fire and Safety Officer, stated 
he had a record of this matter. The procedure followed was the 
normal one of borrowing the smoke ejector. Mr. Goetzel briefly 
outlined his professional background, including systems and pro- 
cedures of firefighting in tall buildings (alluding to Mr. Doherty' s 



COMMITTEE 



2903 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

special concern with the Southwest complex) . He stated that he, 
too, found it hard to adjust to the academic atmosphere at first; 
perhaps Mr. Doherty is having similar difficulty. Mr. Goetzel 
cited a hydrant survey submitted to Mr. Hugill, Director of Physical 
Plant in January. Treasurer Johnson noted that hydrant studies 
have been made in the past . One is n °w in process . 

Dean Redfern observed that progress is being made. He 
felt that Chief Doherty would like to be informed and consulted in 
matters pertaining to fire safety. Treasurer Johnson said it is 
standard procedure to submit all building plans to the Chief before 
they go to bid. Mr. Goetzel is the University liaison "contact 
point" for the Fire Chief. 

Chairman Haigis summarized that there doesn't seem to be s 
great deal of difference of opinion; there are no points on which 
we are tremendously far apart. The University is a different kind 
of entity. Some changes requested by the Town of Amherst would re- 
quire a special act of the Legislature, and this may or may not be 
possible. 

There was discussion on the responsibility for housekeep- 
ing in the buildings, with particular reference to deliveries and 
storage. Special mention was made of volatile material, flammable 
liquids. Mr. Goetzel has been working with Mr. Hugill and Depart- 
ment Heads on this problem. He knows he is trying to keep the 
problem in check. He has kept himself informed as to the nature of 
the liquids and the recommended handling procedures by soliciting 
information from appropriate authorities. 

Trustee Gordon said the Trustees are charged with the 
management of the University. They do their best. From this point 
on, through Mr. Grady's office and other means, he hoped the 
Trustees would have further liaison on fire protection problems. 
He explained the University is growing at a tremendous rate. How- 
ever, continued liaison between men of goodwill and good judgment 
to undertake the protection of the student body is a good thing and 
should continue. The Board of Trustees felt they were giving stu- 
dents structures of quality which they deserved and were concerned 
that Chief Doherty' s news release indicated otherwise. The Board 
is relieved to find that the Chief agrees on this point. 

Trustee Emerson said that the Chief had raised some good 
issues. Based on the growth of the University, it would seem ad- 
visable to have a long-range fire protection plan. 

Selectman MacLeod, as Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
expressed the feeling that the meeting had been helpful. He said 
both the University and the Town have demonstrated their great de- 
sire to cooperate. He would like to have the University agree with 
what is actually needed for fire protection regardless of who is 
going to pay for it. 



2904 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chief Doherty felt the program was paramount and the 
financing was a matter of separate concern. He felt the Trustees 
should be supplied with a copy of the Fire Protection Needs Report. 
Mr. MacLeod said that a meeting to discuss the total picture has 
never been held; only details and fragments are reviewed. In view 
of the great responsibility of the Town Fire Department for the 
property and lives of students and faculty, it is vitally important 
for the Trustees to be informed by reading this report. 

Mr. Grady said the administration has discussed the total 
picture and has presented a plan for doubling the town fire pro- 
tection in a good program. These matters have had private discus- 
sion and exploration with the Town Manager and others. 

Town Manager Torrey said one proposed solution was to have 
a University Fire Department. He opposed this proposal. He further 
stated that if such a plan were consummated, he would enter a bill 
in the Legislature to have the Town of Amherst absolved from all 
responsibility for University fire protection. 

Chairman Haigis stated that the committee would be happy 
to consider any proposed solutions, but that the full Board of 
Trustees makes the final policy decisions. 

Chief Doherty reiterated that his statement to the press 
was spontaneous. He apologized, for he knew he did not follow 
protocol. He conceded that he had promised at a meeting a week 
earlier with Treasurer Johnson that he would clear through the 
Trustees before making any outside statement. Mr. Torrey said there 
is always a gray area of jurisdiction. Amherst cannot impose its 
building code on the Buildings and Grounds Committee. Determination 
should be made as to where the jurisdictional lines begin and end. 
He stated that the Chief's remarks were poorly timed, but that he 
stood solidly behind him. He conceded that the Town Fire Department 
had many problems of its own. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that as a result of Chief 
Doherty' s newspaper statement, the Stats Fire Marshal was on campus 
on Friday. The Governor had asked him to make a report to him on 
what should be done. 

Chairman Haigis thanked the Amherst Town Officials for 
joining the meeting and they left. 

Trustee Pumphret read portions of a memorandum from Mr. 
Glynn of Hugh Stubbins and Associates which refuted comments 
attributed to Chief Doherty about the inadequacy and poor quality 
of buildings erected by the University Building Authority. He made 
special reference to access and fire hydrant installations as well 
as storage conditions in specific areas, indicating that indiscrimi- 
nate piling of storage items and housekeeping or maintenance con- 
ditions were less than ideal, creating lack of proper aisles. 
Discussion ensued between Mr. Goetzel and Mr. Glynn on proper 
storage procedures. With the completion of the Center Warehouse in 
a few months, it is expected appropriate areas will be set apart. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Gordon suggested securing an expert, with 
acknowledged professional stature, to provide an overall analysis 
of the entire situation. The President added that Mr. Goetzel is a 
qualified operating specialist and the addition of an outside con- 
sultant seemed feasible. This was mentioned in a recent report by 
Sasaki Associates. Treasurer Johnson described the qualifications 
of Mr. Rex Wilson, stating he has been under contract to the Uni- 
versity. It was proposed he be engaged to do a complete analysis of 
the campus in terms of what is required, including review of what 
Whitman and Howard are doing. Discussion ensued as to means of 
financing, with Chairman of the Finance Committee Pumphret suggest- 
ing the possibility of a similar arrangement to that which the 
Turnpike Authority has with the towns. 

A motion was made, seconded, and it was 
To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : To retain Mr. Rex Wilson, fire protection 
consultant, to do a study of present and 
future fire protection needs on the campus. 

Trustee Emerson suggested the consultant be advised to 
proceed on the basis of a future enrollment of 25,000 students. He 
should also consider the feasibility of creating a University fire 
department. The future growth of the University makes this an 
essential consideration. 

Treasurer Johnson quoted the Fire Marshal |S report and 
stated it will be available for distribution in a month. 

Trustee Gordon suggested Mr. Goetzel keep in touch with 
Chief Doherty and, within a day or two, secure from him a list of 
specific problem areas which he still feels need attention. 

The meeting moved to the discussion of the acquisition of 
property in Worcester for the Medical School. Treasurer Johnson 
described the current situation with the Syrian Church. The six- 
acre property was acquired by them nine years ago, at a price of 
$7,322.00; last August we offered $21,000 and had no reply until 
recently, when it developed they had appealed to the Governor who 
referred them to counsel. Representative Gammal from Worcester 
called last week requesting that $55,000 expended for plans for the 
future church building should also be repaid. 



The meeting was then a 



ned at 12:05 p.m. 




(Mid 1 ,/. 



Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of 




tees 



290;- 



Fire 

Protection 

Consultant 



Medical 
School 
Land 
Acquisition 



2906 



COMMITTEE 



Faculty 
Club 



Investment 

Counsel 

Service 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

May 1, 1967, 3:40 p.m., Conference Room, U of M at Boston, Mass, 

PRESENT : Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Frechette, Gordon; 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney, Miss Coulter. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Messrs. Wood and Ladd of Standish, 
Ayer and Wood, Inc. investment counsel; 
Messrs. Brand, Myers, Morrissey. 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting of the Committee on 
Finance at 3:4-0 p.m. 

Treasurer Johnson discussed item 2 of the agenda, Financing 
of the Faculty Club addition. He explained the plan for the build- 
ings, as approved by the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. The 
proposal calls for moving the Homestead to a site north of the 
Stockbridge House. A connecting structure of colonial style would be 
added by the Faculty Club. The cost will approximate $100,000 for 
the addition. The Treasurer said the Faculty Club is undertaking a 
fund raising campaign for this. The success of the drive will 
determine the need and the extent of borrowing required to complete 
the job. In the meantime, avenues for borrowing are being explored. 
One possibility would be for the Trustees to approve an interest- 
bearing loan from endowment funds. A standard commercial loan will 
not be possible; the property is not of course owned by the faculty 
organization. There was discussion. President Lederle said it is 
not unusual for a university to provide a place for the faculty to 
gather informally. 

Question was raised as to the legal status of the proposed 
Faculty Club. Treasurer Johnson will consult with legal counsel on 
this. 

Treasurer Johnson advised it would be fall before the 
Faculty Club needed money. The current inquiry is actually just to 
secure a statement of position. Any further Finance Committee 
action would result from a later request or recommendation of the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee. After further discussion, it was 
the consensus that this matter should be moved forward. 

Mr. Ladd circulated copies of "Portfolio Policy of College 
Endowment Funds" (attached) which showed that many universities had 
endowment funds invested in real estate. Mr. Wood of Standish, 
Ayer and Wood, Inc., investment counsellors, addressed the committee. 
He noted that the predictions of their previous report to the com- 
mittee have been borne out. At this time there is a business 
recession which would not appear to be of long duration nor of great 
depth. There are already signs of recovery. A report as of March 3C 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

has been prepared and will be in the hands of the committee soon. 
This will show the University portfolio is pretty much in line with 
the rest of the country. Basically, he recommended maintaining our 
current investment position. 

Mr. Ted Ladd referred to the letter of April 26 which had 
been supplied to the members of the committee. He continued to 
describe the current market situation on bonds, saying it is wildly 
gyrating and has started to weaken again. Mr. Ladd considered it 
entirely possible bond prices would be lower later this year. He 
went on to discuss the possible effects, and recommended taking 
advantage of the long-term issues. Mr. Ladd recommended selling 
the 4"2 Treasury bonds; buying export-import. It was Standish, Ayer 
and Wood, Inc.'s opinion the bond portfolio is spread over the next 
thirty years pretty evenly and they suggest leaving it so. He des- 
cribed the stock portfolio, saying it seemed opportune to do a 
little "housecleaning" by taking small recent holdings and switch- 
ing into other issues on the theory of concentrating, since any 
gains on small issues would not cumulate consequentially. 

Mr. Wood then described the situation in oil holdings, 
stating there seemed to be a pretty large industry commitment in 
this field and it was considered advisable to cut down. Discussion 
ensued and resulted in a decision to sell 128 shares of Mobil, 
leaving a balance of 300 shares of this stock in the portfolio. 

Chairman Pumphret favored adoption of the recommendations 
as extended to the committee by the investment counsellors. After 
discussion, a moation was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the changes in 
orders in the University's investment portfolio 
as recommended by Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. 

Common Stock Proposal 



Sell Issue 

171 Continental Insurance Co. 

29 General Mills 

23 Manufacturers Hanover 

22 New England Merchants 

128 Mobil Oil Corporation 

11 Society Corporation 

27 Warner Swasey 

30 F. W. Woolworth 



290? 



Approximate 


Market 


Price 


Value 


78 


$ 13,338 


68 


1,972 


47 


1,081 


45 


990 


44 


5,632 


54 


594 


44 


1,188 


23 


690 



Endowment Funds - Uninvested Principal Cash 



$ 25.485 

12.310 

$ 37.795 



COMMITTEE 



John W. Ryan 
Faculty - 
Convocation 
Award Fund 



Trust Fund 
Legislation 



Buy 

80 
300 
100 
100 
100 
140 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Issue 



Dow Chemical 

Travelers Corporation 

Union Carbide 

Monsanto 

Goodyear 

Fund American 



The Operating Fund was left status quo. 



Approximate 


Market 


Price 


Value 


80 


$ 6,400 


34 


10,200 


55 


5,500 


52 


5,200 


43 


4,300 


34 


4.760 



$36.360 



Treasurer Johnson asked for a current policy decision on 
Certificates of Deposit, also what is considered to he a favorable 
rate on savings bank deposits. Mr. Wood counseled to continue pur- 
chase of CD's or go into commerical paper market. He recommended 
not going into the 90-day preferred interest savings bank accounts 
too deeply as this could tie up funds. 

President Lederle made a motion to rescind the existing 
policy on Certificates of Deposit, to allow flexibility in investment 
of funds. Motion was seconded and it was 

VOTED : To rescind the existing policy requiring 

minimum earnings of 4i% on savings accounts 
and 5% on Certificates of Deposit. 

Copies of a letter from Associate Professor Bluestone 
describing a fund collected by the faculty of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston to commemorate the inauguration of Chancellor. 
Ryan and the Convocation of December 1966 were supplied to the mem- 
bers of the committee. The committee expressed its approval both of 
the fund and the honor thus bestowed on the Chancellor. A motion 
was thereupon made, seconded, and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the John W. Ryan 1966 Faculty-Convocation 
Award Fund be included in the Endowment 
Funds of the University in accordance with 
the terms of the grant attached herewith. 

Treasurer Johnson commented on the proposed Trust Fund 
Legislation draft by the Legislative Committee on Federal Financial 
Assistance ( re State Auditor's Report). The Treasurer has his 
report, in response to the Auditor's report, prepared but has 
delayed circulation, in hope that the pending legislation would take 
care of these questions. 

Trustee Gordon felt the University should one day have 
someone in Washington to correlate all University requests to be sure 
all possible Federal funds are obtained. 



\ 



I 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



2903 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was further discussion as to the proposed legisla- 
tion which proposed that all overhead and grant funds go into the 
State General Fund. The Trustees vigorously opposed this pro- 
cedure . 

Members of the Finance Committee were supplied with 
copies of a report entitled VOLUNTARY GROUP DISABILITY INCOME 
INSURANCE, which had been prepared by the Ad Hoc Advisory Insurance 
Committee of the faculty. This report evaluated the bids and sug- 
gested a carrier to the University for the aforementioned insurance 
plan. There was discussion which brought out that the entire cost 
of the program will be borne by the employees who elect to join the 
program. The effect of the proposal is merely to permit the 
company to came on campus to establish the group. The University's 
only contribution would be to bear the cost of payroll deductions. 

Mr. Sidney Myers, Assistant Business Manager, described 
the plan and responded to questions. Trustee Frechette expressed 
concern as to division of professional and non-professional plans. 
It was explained that this was a division established by the in- 
surance company and that the rates were based on this breakdown. 

After furtiher discussion, a motion was made, seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it award the contract for the Voluntary 
Group Disability Income Insurance program 
to Boston Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
Boston, Massachusetts (Agent: James D. 
Raymond Insurance Agency, Inc., 41 Main 
Street, Northampton, Massachusetts) in 
accordance with specifications on file in 
the Office of the Treasurer, and specifically 
that the entire cost of said program be paid 
by the employees who elect to join the program. 

Note was made that Trustee Healey was absent and did not 
participate in this vote. 

Treasurer Johnson stated his comments on the Auditor's 
Report will be presented at the nexts meeting of the committee. 



Voluntary 

Group 

Disability 

Income 

Insurance 



The meeting was then 




Robert J. Mclcartiftey 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2910 



COMMITTEE 



Engineering 
Revision - 
Ph.D. in 
Mechanical 
Engineering 



Department of 
Mechanical & 
Aerospace 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 8, 1967, 11:30 a.m., President's Office, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 
Haigis, Lyons, Maginnis, Plimpton; Provost 
Tippo, Secretary McCartney, Miss Coulter. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Chancellor Ryan, Dr. Swanhart, A.C.E. 
Intern, Dr. Venman, Dean Moore, Dean 
Picha, Dean Hunsberger, Associate Dean 
V/agner, Professors Dixon, Benzanson, 
duBois, Me lien, and Professor Dwight 
Allen of Stanford. 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 11:30 a.m. 

Provost Tippo informally advised the committee of the 
defacing over the weekend of several University buildings with 
painted anti-war slogans. 

The Provost also mentioned the art exhibit now being shown 
in the Commonwealth Room of the Student Union. 

Discussion followed on proposed new programs and courses. 
Supporting material had been supplied to the members of the committee 
in advance. 

Dean Picha, Professor Mellen and Professor Dixon entered 
the meeting. Professor Dixon presented the proposals of the School 
of Engineering for a revision of the M.S. degree and establishment 
of the Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering; also the establishment 
of an Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Program; also the change ir 
name for the Department of Mechanical Engineering to the Department 
of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

There was discussion on the changing picture and require- 
ments in the field of engineering. Dean Picha commented on the need 
for the doctoral program in Mechanical Engineering, as outlined in 
the summary sheet supplied (Document 67-059) . Provost Tippo 
supported this recommendation. 

Dean Moore of the Graduate School entered the meeting. He 
stated the Ph.D. is an appropriate degree for engineering in these 
times . He noted that approval of the doctoral program in Mechanical 
Engineering would aid in attracting a high calibre faculty. 



it was 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

approval of the revision of the M.S. degree 
program and a doctoral program in Mechanical 
Engineering, as outlined in Document 67-059. 



i 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After further discussion, a motion was made, seconded, 



and it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
an undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Pro- 
gram be established, as outlined in Document 
67-060. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve a change in name for the De- 
partment of Mechanical Engineering to the 
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering . 

Dean Hunsberger, Dean Wagner, Professor Bezanson and Pro- 
fessor duBois entered the meeting. They submitted the proposal for 
a Bachelor of Music degree. Dean Hunsberger outlined justification 
for the proposal as described in a memorandum to the College of 
Arts and Sciences, copies of which had been supplied to the com- 
mittee in advance of the meeting . (Document 67-061) . 

Discussion ensued. 






911 



Aerospace 

Engineering 

Program 



Bachelor of 
Music Degree 



After further comment, motion was made, seconded, and it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve a Bachelor of Music degree as 
detailed in Document 67-061, which document 
has been supplied to the Board of Trustees and 
is attached herewith. 

Dr. Venman and Professor Mellen submitted to the committee 
a listing of proposed new courses (Document 67-062). 

The Provost stated each proposal had been reviewed within 
the originating department and all appropriate university committees 
Question was raised as to whether, in view of new courses added, any 
courses were discontinued. It was agreed that a listing would be 
supplied yearly to the Board showing added, modified, or discontinued 
courses . 



New 
Courses 



it was 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the courses of instruction 
summarized in Document 67-062, which docu- 
ment is herewith made a part of these 
minutes . 



2912 



Deanship - 
School of 
Education 



COMMITTEE 



Boston 
Faculty- 
Constitution 



daVinci 
Manuscripts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee then moved to the Dukes Room of the Student 
Union for luncheon. Professor Dwight W. Allen of Stanford University 
candidate for the Deanship of the School of Education, was inter- 
viewed . 

After Professor Allen's departure from the informal meet- 
ing, discussion ensued and it was unanimously agreed to recommend to 
the Board of Trustees at its meeting on May 15 that Professor Allen 
be offered the Deanship of the School of Education. 

Secretary McCartney distributed copies of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston Constitution (Document 67-063) . After brief 
discussion and after a motion was made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they confirm and approve the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston Faculty Constitution, 
Document 67-063, which is herewith attached 
to and made a part of these minutes. 

President Lederle briefly reported on the current status 
of the University's relations with the Spanish authorities, with 
respect to publication of the da Vinci manuscripts. This matter has 
been resolved very favorably. During the recent visit of Dean Moore, 
the Spaniards recognized the validity of the original contract. As 
the matter now stands, however, they have the right to publish an 
initial, popular edition. Ten percent of the royalties of the 
popular edition will be given to the University of Massachusetts in 
support of the scholarly edition which we are to publish. In turn, 
we will give to the Spanish authorities, 100 copies of the scholarly 
edition, one of which they plan to present to President Johnson. An 
elaborate contract signing ceremony is planned to be held in Madrid 
on May 17. Dean Moore will represent the University of Massachusetts 



I 



The meeting was adjourne 




Robert J 
Secretary 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



a 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
May 15, 1967, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Haigis, Healey, 
Lyons, Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 
Miss Coulter 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan 



In the absence of the Chairman, Vice Chairman Healey 
opened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. 

It n»as decided to defer discussion of agenda item "Budget 
Transfers" to the June meeting. 

Treasurer Johnson discussed Policy Items for the 1969 
Budget Request briefly. He said the University has been assured 
of Reserve Funds, but has not yet received them in full. 

Discussion continued on the 1969 Budget Request, with 
the comment that it is expected Amherst will have an increase of 
1,500 students; Boston anticipates an enrollment of 3,400 students, 
an increase of 800. The Summer School will increase by 275. The 
breakdown was offered as 



Undergraduate 


12,430 


(up 


1090) 


Graduates 


2,800 


(up 


400) 


Stockbridge 


570 


(up 


10) 



The Treasurer stated that planned salary levels of the new appoint- 
ments must be projected at approximately 6% increase from present 
overages. 

President Lederle noted the need for additional funds for 
specific programs, including the library, continuing education, 
public television; also that the University should move toward im- 
plementing a law school. 

The committee discussed the foregoing and it was the 
consensus that despite the able report demonstrating the need for 
a law school, current and pending problems, i.e. UM/Boston site, 
Continuing Education, should first be satisfactorily resolved be- 
fore pressing for additional new programs. It was decided to con- 
sider a budget request for the law school again next year. 



2913 



2914 



COMMITTEE 



Student 

Health 

Fee 



UM/Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Executive Committee was advised the operating budget 
would he presented to the Board in the month following the appro- 
priation act. Trust Fund budgets will be presented at the meeting 
on June 3 or at the next following meeting. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 
of discussing certain matters pertaining to 
personnel and finances. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the 
purpose of continuing with the agenda of 
the meeting. 

Discussion of Agenda Item 4, Increase in Student Health 
Fee, was postponed until June 3 to allow the appropriate student 
organizations to consider this proposal. Dr. Gage is hopeful the 
fee will be raised from $20 to $25 per semester. 

Chairman Boyden introduced into the meeting a letter he 
had from the President of the Student Senate recommending an 
optional student meal ticket plan, with a request for Trustee 
approval. After brief discussion, it was agreed, without vote, to 
defer action on this request. 

Chairman Haigis of the Buildings and Ground Committee re- 
viewed a prepared statement he proposed to present to the full 
Board relative to the site of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston. Chancellor Ryan distributed copies of a statement 
summarizing for each member of the Board the University s f undamentah. 
aims in searching for the site. 

The meeting was adjourned for luncheon at 12:30 p.m. 



r 



I 




Robe 
Secretary 



I 



COMMITTEE 



291 5 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 26, 1967, 10:00 a.m., UM at Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Halgis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Croce, Frechette; Treasurer 
Johnson, Miss (Joulter. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Chancellor Ryan, Dean Soutter, 
Planning Officer Littlefield, 
Acting Director of Libraries Clay, 
Mr. Frank O'Brien and Mr. John 
Stockwell. 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:05 a.m. He 
introduced the first agenda item, a plot of land in Worcester now- 
owned by T,ne Syrian Church. 

Treasurer Jonnson advised that State Representative Gammel, 
who was expected to be present could not attend. He will appear at 
some future meeting. This will be in support of the Syrian Church's 
claim for a substantially higher price for their property which the 
University seeks to acquire as part of its Medical School/Hospital 
area. The Treasurer briefly reviewed the history of this matter for 
the benefit of the committee, noting that the original offer had 
been $41,000 for the six acres of land, subject to the approval of 
the Trustees. Nothing official had been heard from the Syrian 
Church. 

Chairman Haigis turned the meeting over to Dean Soutter 
for discussion of Medical School - exterior design. The Dean ad- 
vised that Mr. Aldrich of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty was in San 
Francisco. In any event he is not now ready to make a formal pre- 
sentation of the facade of the building. The Dean, by means of a 
table model, illustrated the theory of the plan for the buildings, 
including future additions when the need may arise. He described it 
as a functional building, pointing out the purposes of the various 
areas and the aesthetic effect of placing the library and dining 
halls in separate wings. The Dean feels the solution is acceptable. 

Dean Soutter opposed the use of wide panel glass through- 
out the building, based on the experience of hospitals throughout the 
country stressing the need for patient privacy and also screening the 
elements. In general discussion, the committee expressed satisfac- 
tion at the resulting building design. 

Concern was expressed for improved acoustics, especially 
in the laboratories. 

Mr. John Stockwell, Hospital Director, described for the 
committee the interior planning of the hospital building, indicating 
on a set of blueprints the areas of interest and their proposed use. 



Land - 
Worcester 
.(Gammel 
Petition) 



Syrian 
Church 



Medical 
School 
Exterior 
Design 



Medical 

School 

Interior 



2916 



COMMITTEE 



Wore ester - 
Library 
Preliminary 
Plans 



Amherst 
Library 
Preliminary 
Plans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It is expected there will be 4-00 beds. The importance of separating 
traffic was emphasized, since all types have quite different needs. 
Plans to insure separation and easy pedestrian flow were shown. 

It is expected . daily that there will be 500 - 1,000 
people entering this building. Thus, separate patient entrances in- 
cluded in the design will effectively separate the different types 
of people entering, each according to their requirement. 

Dean Soutter explained that this will be a !; referral type" 
hospital, which makes a forecast of its full scope of activity 
difficult this far in advance. 

Applications for federal grant were filed in February. 
The site visit was held April 3 and 4. Dean Soutter reviewed the 
results of the site visit, including the plan for a second visit. 
He stated that further consideration to the application would 
probably be given by August. 

The Dean briefly summarized current plans for acquiring 
faculty and stated they were going well, due in great measure to 
the facilities and proposed program plans. He also stated that 
30,000 books have arrived in Amherst to be sorted, labeled and 
listed on punch cards, before storing in Worcester pending completioji 
of library facilities there. Treasurer Johnson anticipated that, 
at the next meeting of the Buildings and Grounds Committee, plans 
for acquisition of the Shaw Building in Worcester for this purpose 
would have progressed to the point where formal committee action 
would be needed. 

Planning Officer Littlefield described the preliminary 
plans for the Library at Amherst. The architects have been working 
closely with Acting Director of Libraries Clay and Mr. Littlefield; 
also, Dean Belluschi has gone over the exterior design with 
Treasurer Johnson. 

Mr. Littlefield submitted for examination sets of prints 
which indicated the library would have 28 levels; two underground, 
and an ultimate capacity of 2 1/2 million books. Professor Clay 
joined in describing the building, floor by floor, along with the 
proposed use of the areas indicated. There was animated general 
discussion. It was noted that every modern device is being employed 
to aid the students (anticipated total of 25,000 by 1975) and to ex- 
tend the usefulness of the facilities, including microfilming, to 
save space. 

The building was designed to be red brick; however, the 
committee expressed an interest in having an alternate plan for 
limestone. Treasurer Johnson agreed to secure colored renderings 
from the architect showing the building with each material. It was 
left that alternate bids be prepared. On motion made and seconded, 
it was 



1 



COMMITTEE 



II 



2917 



UNiVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

V01ED : To recommend to one Board of Trustees 
approval of preliminary plans for tue 
Horary as prepared by Edward Durrell 
otone, architect, subject t,o further 
review of the material on the exterior 
facade of one building. 

Dean Soutter distributed copies of a brochure showing the 
Medical School. Dean Belluschi has approved the design. After dis- 
cussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : Subject to the approval of the Beard of 

Trustees, to accept the preliminary exterior 
design of the Medical Science Building. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a request for Trustee action 
on the exterior lighting at the Southwest Complex. The original 
plans anticipated the lights from the building itself would be 
adequate, but experience has proven lamp posts and exterior lighting 
is necessary. After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority to install area lighting 
in the Southwest Dormitory Complex. 

The Treasurer informed the committee of the advisability 
of acquiring a small parcel of land on the northwest corner of the 
campus in order to tie two parcels together on the west side. He 
stated two appraisals have been made: ($250 and $300) and the owner 
insists upon $400, plus permission to pump water out of the brook. 
After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees: 

1. That in accordance with Chapter 590, Acts 
of 1966, Item 8067, and other acts, 
authorizing the Trustees of the University 
to acquire land, or land with buildings 
thereon, by purchase or by eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, for 
the further development of the University; 
independent appraisals of the value of the 
land and buildings, if any, having been 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers 
and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
the Trustees of the University purchase or take 
by eminent domain in fee, that portion, 22,050 
square feet more or less, of the property of 
Anna and Casmir Ziomek located in Amherst, 
highway 116, and designated as parcel 4D-7 on 
pages 4D and 7B of the Amherst Town Atlas 
(1964), and that the purchase price for said 
property to Four Hundred ($400) dollars. 



Medical 

Science 

Building 

Exterior 

Design 



Southwest 
Complex 
Exterior 
Lighting 



Ziomek 
Property 



2318 



COMMITTEE 



Mclntire 

Land 

Acquisition 



UM/Boston 
Master Plan 
Designer 



UM/Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. That, to the extent that the Trustees 
may be authorized in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 75 of the 
General Laws, Treasurer Kenneth W. 
Johnson is authorized to grant to 
Anna and Casmir Ziomek owners, permission to 
enter the above described land from 
time to time for the purpose of pump- 
ing irrigation water from the creek 
located thereon. 

Treasurer Johnson read a draft of a letter to Professor 
Ruth Mclntire, embodying the terms of a proposed acquisition of 
property. The result of the negotiation is a gift of land and ex- 
change of land with Professor Mclntire. After discussion, it was 
the consensus that a straight deed would be acceptable and Treasurer 
Johnson was authorized to continue with negotiations. 

After consideration of a Master Plan Designer for the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Boston, the Treasurer advised that 
Pietro Belluschi had made formal application to the Designer Selec- 
tion Board of the project. There was further discussion of the 
various architects who should also be considered for recommendation 
to the Designer Selection Board. These will be the topic for dis- 
cussion at the next meeting of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds . 

Chairman Haigis submitted to the committee a copy of a 
brochure prepared and sent by Mr. Logue's BRA office, describing the 
advantages of Columbia Point as a site for the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston. Presumably each Trustee will receive this by 
mail. Chancellor Ryan and Mr. O'Brien discussed at length the con- 
tents of the brochure. 

The need for a formalized evaluation of Columbia Point 
using our site criteria was expressed. It was agreed to secure this 
from Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, in form to be supplied to the 
Trustees . 

The advisability of preparing a presentation similar to 
Mr. Logue's on the Air Rights site was considered. This, too, was 
considered the province of the consultants, Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates. 

Mr. O'Brien informed the committee of the results of 
personal meetings and conversations with various key people relative 
to the Air Rights site. The new result indicated that there was no 
obdurate, general deepseated objection. 

Chancellor Ryan outlined conversations neld at various 
times with Mr. Edward Logue of BRA; also, with Mr. Tyson of Liberty 
Mutual, and the editor of the Boston Herald. Chancellor Ryan stated 



\ 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



Z919 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



he has informed everyone we want an inter city location. A com- 
pendium of inner city sites under consideration should be prepared. 



The meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p.m. 





Robert/y. McCartney 
Secretary, feoard of Trustee 




Q920 



COMMITTEE 



M.S. and Ph.D. 
in Astronomy 



CAMROC 
(NEROC) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

June 19, 1967, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Rowland, 
McNamara; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Miss 
Coulter . 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Deans Moore, Spielman, Hunsberger, 
Tunis, Maki, Wagner; Professors 
Mellen, Gluckstem, Irvine, Sheckels,, 
Hutchinson, Westhead, Paulsen. 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. 

A proposal to offer a Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree in Astronomy was submitted. Dr. William M. 
Irvine, Chairman of the Astronomy Prog-ram, and Dr. Gluckstem, Head 
of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, explained the need for 
the program. 

Dr. Irvine stated the time was propitious, the faculty 
strong, the national need great for Ph.D. graduates in Astronomy. 
The importance of Ph.D. work in Astronomy relative to the national 
space program and the attraction of industry was emphasized. Such 
a program also would enable recruitment of a quality faculty that 
is difficult to obtain with undergraduate program alone. In 
addition it would make available grants for equipment and facilities 
not possible to obtain for undergraduate departments. It was noted 
that no other state university in New England offers graduate work 
in Astronomy. 

There was discussion on acquisition of equipment. Dr. 
Irvine stated the great expense is offset through cooperative 
efforts with other schools: i.e. Harvard, for the use of the 85' 
radiotelescope; also, with the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory. 

The proposed program is described in Document 67-072. 

Dr. Robert L. Gluckstem advised the Committee of the 
interest of the Cambridge Radio Observatory Committee (CAMROC) in 
having the University participate in its programs and join the 
group. He stated there is no financial commitment envisioned at 
present. This is a federally funded project. The corporation has 
a scientific purpose. It is devoted to establishment of laboratories, 
experimental stations and other facilities for research and develop- 
ment in physical and biological sciences. Initially its interest 
is in radio astronomy. Membership would provide access to the $25- 
$35 million dollar facilities - one of the major observatories in 
the world. The preliminary design for the New England Radio-Radar 
Telescope has been completed and formal request for NSF funding is 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pending. GAMROC proposes a non-profit corporation (CAMROC, INC.) 
to submit the proposal to NSF, to recommend or select the final 
site and provide scientific management of the facility. 

Drs. Gluckstern and Irvine left the meeting. 

Discussion followed. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the proposal to offer 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
Degrees in Astronomy, as described in 
Document 67-072. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the University join GAMROC (Cambridge Radio 
Observatory Committee) with the attendant 
responsibilities and privileges. 

Professors Sheckels and Hutchinson joined the meeting. 
Dr. Sheckels submitted a request for approval of a Ph.D. program. 
He briefly reviewed the beginnings of the Electrical Engineering 
Department, and the improvement in quality of the graduates 
attracted, noting that this year there have been 219 inquiries on 
admission prior to June, 1967; twenty-five to thirty students plan 
to attend in the fall. The fourteen faculty members are qualified 
to carry on the program. Professor Sheclcels outlined the following: 
(l) the great need of the teaching profession and industry (2) the 
improved quality of the department which would result from the 
addition of this program (3) the increased opportunity to obtain 
fellowships (4) additional grant money available to faculty members 
with Ph.D.'s (5) increase in general University prestige. The 
entire proposal is outlined in Document 67-073. There was dis- 
cussion. Professors Sheckels and Hutchinson then left the meeting. 

Dean Moore supported the proposal. He stated the program 
had been in preparation for three years. He further stated that in 
his judgment the proposal was 20 years overdue. 



it was 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the Ph.D. program for the 
Electrical Engineering Department, as 
outlined in Document 67-073. 

Dean of the Graduate School, Edward Moore, described the 
proposed Master of Science Program in Marine Science, as outlined 
in Document 67-074, supplied to the members of the committee in 
advance of the meeting. The present staff is sufficiently competent 



2321 



M.S. & Ph.D. 
in Astronomy 



Ph.D. in 

Electrical 

Engineering 



Zd22 



COMMITTEE 



M.S. Program 
in Marine 
Science 



Undergraduate 
Major in 
Biochemistry 



Master Plan 
for 

Reorganization 
Graduate 
Program in 
Germanic 
Languages and 
Literature s 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and interested in the program to support it. It is expected that 
the Boston campus will he included as the program develops. 

President Lederle noted that the program is "basically a 
regrouping of courses. Only one new course will be required. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the interdisciplinary program 
leading to the Master of Science Degree in 
Marine Science as detailed in Document 67-074. 

Dr. Edward Westhead, Acting Head of the Department of 
Biochemistry, introduced a proposal for an undergraduate major in 
Biochemistry. Complete description of the proposal, including 
justification, comparative data with other universities, space and 
equipment requirements as well as staff requirements and data were 
incorporated in Document 67-075. This was supplied to the committee 
in advance of the meeting. Professor Westhead stated the Department 
of Biochemistry proposes to inaugurate an undergraduate program 
leading to the B.S. degree with a major in Biochemistry. No new 
courses are proposed. There was discussion. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the proposal for an undergraduate 
major in Biochemistry as outlined in 
Document 67-075 he adopted. 

Dean Hunsberger, Dr. Paulsen and Associate Dean Wagner, 
presented a proposed Master Plan for reorganization of the Graduate 
Program in Germanic Languages and Literatures. These course changes 
and additions, designed to broaden the Department of Germanic 
Languages and Literatures in the areas of (1) Scandinavian 
Languages and Literatures (2) Dutch Language and Literature 
(3) Germanic Philosogy were incorporated in Document 67-076, 
supplied to the committee in advance of the meeting. 

There was discussion as to long range plans and benefits. 
It is proposed to experiment for the time being with only one 
language, i.e. Danish — if enrollments are good in the next two 
years, the Department proposes to try Swedish. Provost Tippo 
stated a report would be made yearly on enrollment in these courses. 

Dr. Paulsen left the meeting. 

There was discussion and comment; motion was made, 
seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

adoption of the master plan for reorganiza- 
tion of the Graduate Program in Germanic 
Languages and Literatures as outlined in 
Document 67-076. 



I 



I 



! 



1 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Haigis suggested a future meeting devoted ex- 
clusively to the discussion of language courses, in light of 
current world need. 

The Provost presented four proposed changes (amendments) 
to the Constitution of the Faculty Senate, UM/A, as set forth in 
Document 67-077, attached. All of these have been approved by the 
Senate. The changes (1) arrange for the Athletic Council to keep 
the outgoing chairman on for a year following expiration of his 
term if his chairmanship and term of council membership expire 
simultaneously (2) provide for inclusion of members of the pro- 
fessional library staff as members of the Faculty Senate (3) allows 
the Committee on Committees to recommend temporary replacement as 
necessary to Senate committees during the summer (4) includes the 
Director of University Libraries as a member of the Senate. 

On motion thereupon made, seconded, it was 

■ VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they confirm and approve the pro- 
posed amendments to the Constitution of 
the Faculty Senate as detailed in 
Document 67-077. 

Associate Dean Wagner next presented a proposal from the 
Art Department for a curriculum which would lead to a specialized 
degree - Bachelor of Fine Arts. This is covered in Document 67-078, 
The program will provide art courses for students desiring to make 
a professional career of art. The proposed degree would adequately 
prepare art majors for study in any graduate school in the nation. 



it v/as 



After discussion, a motion was made and seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the proposed program lead- 
ing to a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio 
Art and Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art 
Education as described in Document 
67-078, attached. 

Provost Tippo submitted a listing of new courses, stating 
that some 45 departments and programs were involved. After comment, 
motion was made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of new courses as listed in 
Document 67-079. 

The Provost next introduced the subject of nepotism, 
specifically appointment of man and wife in the same academic de- 
partment. Discussion followed. The President stated his general 
opposition to nepotism on the ground of principle, but it was 
agreed that certain rare exceptions should be made from time to time 



2923 



Faculty Senate 

Constitution 

Amendments 



Bachelor of 
Fine Arts 

Studio Art 

Art Education 



New Courses 



Nepotism 



2924 



COMMITTEE 



Center for 
International 
Agricultural 
Studies 



Latitude in 

Entrance 

Requirements 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

involving unusually qualified husband and wife teams, both of whom 
are proven scholars and both of whom have held professional posts in 
other universities of quality. 



tinued . 



The meeting moved to luncheon, where the business con- 



Dean Spielman submitted a proposal for a Center for Inter- 
national Agricultural Studies. Copies of this proposal had been 
supplied to members of the committee in advance of the meeting - 
Document 67-080. 

The Dean outlined University involvement in international 
programs over the past century, including Colonel Clark's historic 
visit to Hokkaido, Japan, also the programs in Malawi, Uganda, 
Oxford, Bologna and Madrid. 

Dean Spielman stated a committee of the Faculty in Agri- 
culture had been appointed to study possibilities for international 
activities within the College of Agriculture. Reference was made to 
the Food for Peace Act, passed in 1966, also the International Edu- 
cation Act in 1966, not yet funded. The faculty committee 
recommended programs at both the graduate and undergraduate level. 

The committee agreed to endorse the proposal in principle. 
Any specific proposals will be brought back to the committee for 
further discussion. 

Dean Tunis was invited to discuss Latitude in Entrance 
Requirements in Unusual Cases , as described in Faculty Senate 
Document 67-047. The Dean described the effect of the proposed 
modification of policy, pointing out that it was slight. He 
mentioned that a special faculty committee made up of negro faculty 
members has recommended special consideration for underprivileged 
students. This group plans to travel all over the state in an 
effort to attract promising but underprivileged youth. 

At present certain secondary school subjects are listed as 
required for admission; students who do not meet these requirements 
may be admitted, but with deficiences that have to be made up with- 
out credit. Two modifications are recommended to this policy. Firs 
the same subject requirements should be considered as strongly 
recommended subjects be considered for admission without deficiency 
if, in the judgment of the Dean of Admissions, they show real pro- 
mise of being successful students. 

Dean Tunis reported that the Faculty Senate has voted to 
approve the plan but with the proviso that only 3% of the Freshman 
Class may be exempted from present requirements. 

Dean Tunis assured that the results of this relaxing of 
policy would be reviewed as related to enrollment and result 
annually and a report given to the Faculty Senate and then to the 
Trustee Committee on Faculty and EducationalPoliey. 



] 



COMMITTEE 



jj 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After thorough discussion, motion was made, seconded and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

modification of the University policy on 
subject requirements as detailed in 
Faculty Senate Document 67-047 and as 
amended by the Faculty Senate to limit 
cases to 3% of the Freshman Class. 

President Lederle stated that the final Evaluation Report 
of tne New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
would be summarized at a later meeting. The President termed it 
a very enthusiastic report, indicating the University is on the 
move. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:55 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney / 
Secretary, Board of Trus 



292" 



New England 
Association of 
Colleges and 
Secondary Schools 
Evaluation 
Report 



2926 



COMMITTEE 



Bargaining 
Unit 



Local 1776, 
AFSCME 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



June 26, 



1967 , 10:00 a 
PRESENT 



m., Chancellor's Conference Room, UM, Boston 



Vice Chairman Healey, President Lederle, 
Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Pumphret, Troy; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney, Miss Coulter. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean Redf ern, . Business Manager Grady, 
Staff Assistant Myers; Chancellor 
Ryan. Mr. William Marcello, Chairman, 
Institution Committee, MSEA; Joseph E. 
Deschenes, President, UMEA; Roland R. 
Robinson, Grievance Committee Chair- 
man, UMEA; J. Ernest Fug ere, Vice 
President UMEA; David H. Mercure; 
Paul Korpita, President, Local 1776, 
AFSCME; Edwin J. Butltiewy, Treasurer, 
Local 1776, AFSCME; Richard E. Banner, 
Chairman of Janitors, Local 1776, AFSCME; 
Mark Dalton, General Counselm MSEA; 
Charles C. McGlynn, 1st Vice President, 
MSEA: Clarence Hunter, Executive 
Committeeman, MSEA(UM): Mrs. Barbara 
Fifield, Local 1776, AFSCME; Mr. Kelley, 
State Department of Personnel; Mr. 
Joseph Correa, counsel for Local 1776, 
AFSCME. 



Acting Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 10:10 a.m. 
in the Conference Room of the University at Boston. The first item 
of business was the scheduled informal hearing relating to the 
determination by mutual agreement of the appointing authority and 
employee groups of appropriate bargaining units. 

President Lederle reported on conversations with the 
Attorney General's office on the propriety of holding discussions 
with the University employees prior to establishment of the unit for 
collective bargaining. Business Manager Grady discussed the effect 
of recent pertinent changes in regulations issued by the Office of 
the State Director of Personnel. 

It was agreed to allot twenty minutes to each employee 
group represented at the meeting for presentation of its position. 

Mr. Correa spolce for the Local 1776, AFSCME (AFL-CI0) . 
He reported that he is in effect requesting agreement of three units 
as follows: (1) janitorial employees at Amherst, for which agree- 
ment was sought through presentation of Form B on May 26 (the Presi- 
dent noted that this form was unsigned); (2) for security personnel 
at Amherst, which unit Y/as sought through filing of Form C with the 
State Personnel Director, and (3) for non-professional personnel at 



r 



i 



COMMITTEE 



Wl'* 1 



O"? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston, 'which unit was sought through filing of Form C with the 
State Personnel Director. His position was that the large number 
of University employees made it impractical to group them into one 
unit. In addition, the wide variety of duties and functions of the 
various employees, dictated the need for special, smaller groupings, 
i.e. Janitors (Amherst), Secretarial (Amherst), Clerical (Boston), 
etc. as the need arose. He also contended that the janitor group- 
ing best met the criterion of a common supervisor. 

Mr. Correa indicated, however, that his group would con- 
sider the Boston campus non-professional employees as a separate, 
single group, because of its relatively small size. 

President Lederle questioned Mr. Correa on the propriety 
of filing with the Director of Personnel a Form C, "Petition for 
Bargaining Unit Determination'' , when in fact discussion about a 
bargaining unit had not been completed with members of Local 1776; 
that no disagreement exists until procedures set forth in the rules 
to reach an agreement have been exhausted; and that two of the 
petitions relate to units about which the University has never been 
contacted, much less its agreement sought. 

Mr. Correa explained that he had anticipated disagreement 
as an inevitable future development, and becaise of an earlier 
decision by the Trustees in favor of the single unit, it seemed 
appropriate to him to file such notice. 

Chairman Healey thanked him for his presentation and 
stated that the Executive Committee would endeavor to present the 
employee matters to the full Board of Trustees for discussion on 
Friday, June 30. 

Mr. Mark J. Dalton, representing the Massachusetts State 
Employees Association, next addressed the Committee. He stated that 
MSEA would favor all non-professional employees at the University 
as one unit for bargaining purposes, and had so requested by sub- 
mitting From B on May 26, 1966. A similar determination has not 
been made on the Boston campus, but it seems likely that UM at 
Boston non-professional employees would be considered one unit also. 
The needs of special interest groups would be handled within the 
overall unit. Mr. Dalton produced what he stated were approximately 
500 cards signed by employees asking that the MSEA represent them. 
He stated they represented personnel from all sections of the non- 
professional staff of approximately 2,000 non-professional employees 
on the Amherst campus. 

Chairman Healey thanked him for his presentation. 

There was discussion and brief rebuttal in which both 
parties presented final summaries. The employee representatives 
then left the meeting. 

Chairman Healey stated that it seemed as if both groups 
would agree on a unit composed of all non-professional employees at 



MSEA 



2928 



COMMITTEE 



Employees 
UM at Boston 



Bargaining 
Unit 



Graduate 
Student Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston; both Mr. Correa and Mr. Dalton expressed agreement with 
such a unit. 

Chancellor Ryan joined the meeting. He indicated that no 
active interest was apparent among his employees in regard to 
selection of bargaining unit and that he was not aware of any form 
of organizational activity as yet along these lines. 

After thorough discussion, Chairman Healey noted that the 
Administration and Trustees recommended single bargaining unit in 
November 1966, and that the criteria for determining a unit had not 
changed significantly. 

Trustee Lyons stated the Administration has been very 
open and fair in handling, relations with employee groups and in 
soliciting their viewpoints as to what should constitute an appro- 
priate bargaining unit. 

Chairman Healey stated as the sense of the meeting. 

We recommend to the Board that they designate that the 
appropriate unit for bargaining purposes is "all non- 
professional employees within 15 miles of Amherst" 
and to authorize the President to do whatever is 
necessary to implement the decision of the Board. 
He also noted that mutual agreement exists with 
Local 1776 and the Massachusetts State Employees 
Association on treating UM at Boston non-professional 
employees as a single unit. 

After further discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
one appropriate bargaining unit consist of 
all full-time, non-professional employees 
whose primary place of employment is on or 
within 15 miles of the Amherst campus, 
except those who have been classified 
"managerial"; also that another appro- 
priate bargaining unit consii of all 
full-time non-professional employees of 
UM at Boston, except those who have been 
classified "managerial" . 

Treasurer Johnson submitted for consideration, a proposal 
that a new fee policy for graduate students be adopted, effective 
with the fall semester, 1968. This fee would include the Student 
Union Fee, Health Service Fee and Identification Card Fee (but 
exclude the Commencement fee) on a basis of $5.00 per credit hour, 
up to a maximum of $50.00. This program has the approval of the 
Provost and the Dean of the Graduate School. 



I 



I 



There was discussion. Motion was made, seconded, and it 



was 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that, effective with the fall semester 
1968, graduate students shall pay a 
General Fee consisting of the Student 
Union Fee, the Health Service Fee and 
Identification Card Fee (but excluding 
the Commencement Fee) on a credit hour 
basis up through a total of ten credit 
hours. < A fee of $5.00 per credit hour 
shall be assessed all students for each 
semester and a fee of $2 . 5O per credit 
hour shall be assessed for each summer 
session. Any student registered for 
thesis shall pay a fee of $50.00 regard- 
less of the number of credits for which 
he is registered. Holders of fellowships 
and assistantshir^who receive a waiver 
of tuition do not thereby receive a 
waiver of fees. Each student pays his 
own fees unless special arrangements are 
approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Discussion of the 1968 operating budgets was held. On the 
state appropriated budget, based on what is expected to be appro- 
priated some time in the next few days, the President terms the 
1968 allocations "an austerity budget" . It was noted that the 
growth potential of the University appears to be recognized by the 
Legislature solely on the basis of providing a sufficient number 
of faculty to handle the students. Less money was allowed than 
previous years for travel, supplies and equipment, all of which 
needs to be increased proportionately with the advancement in 
numbers of students and faculty. The President emphasised that the 
situation is "serious." If budget cuts are not restored by later 
supplemental appropriations, the University will find itself 
"moving backward," he said. Though academic salaries are competi- 
tive in New England, provision of support staff is radically below 
the proper level necessary to sustain the faculty. 

Provost Tippo discussed the 1968 State Fund Operating 
Budget. An acute need for additional funds is created by the 
addition of 1500 students, plus 500 full-time equivalent summer 
students - a total increase of 2000 - plus 100 new faculty. 
Despite this growth, less money has been appropriated in a series 
of accounts such as travel, advertising and printing, office 
supplies and equipment. This will seriously handicap the admini- 
stration of university affairs. The Provost pointed out that, 
although we have added 100 new faculty, we have no allowance in the 
budget for furniture or equipment for them. He said the overall 
budgetary increase for educational supplies (account 13) when 
divided by the number of additional students, comes out to $16.66 
per student. This creates an impossible situation. 



2929 



Budgets 



2930 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Provost also reported that our request for supporting 
staff (clerics and technicians) has "been cut drastically. 

Conferences with the Deans, in an effort to cope with 
these problems, resulted in proposals which would mean turning 
students away from laboratory courses or shutting down certain 
laboratories. The computer budget will not permit continued opera- 
tion after January - February, 1968. 

The library situation is really critical. The appropria- 
tion for books is short of the need by $300,000. There has not 
been an increase in the library book funds for the last five years, 
though the number of students using the library has advanced 
rapidly (i.e. 6,000 students). This is reflected in the accredita- 
tion report of the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools which comments at many places on the University's 
"inadequate library." With the present shortage of library funds 
it may become necessary to reduce the hours the library is open. 
The American Council on Education has a table on libraries of 106 
universities. The University of Massachusetts is listed in the 
sixth quality group, which is the lowest grade. The Provost con- 
tinued that faculty research support has been curtailed by $50,000. 
» needed$80,000 is not available for controlled atmospheric chambers 
in the Morrill Science Center; an additional $50,000 is needed for 
library equipment. The Provost continued that the University in- 
tends to put in for a large NSF Center of Excellence grant which 
would do much for our prestige - not to mention a grant of five to 
six million dollars. A real question is emerging whether such a 
grant would be made in view of the present level of budgetary 
support for the library. 

Discussion continued encompassing other areas of deep 
concern. A supplementary budget is vitally necessary. Lacking 
this, a restoration of funds should be requested through a 
deficiency budget. Otherwise, progress at the University may be 
said to have come to a halt. 

Chancellor Ryan described the situation at UM at Boston. 
He stated that the budget adds $40,000 to the Governor's recommenda- 
tion because of six positions left out of the Executive budget. He 
stated the Boston campus is short in every category detailed as 
short in Amherst, particularly library appropriations, the equipment 
account and items to satisfy needs in the science areas. 



Specifically: 

Library appropriations of 
$300,000. 



;]100,000 should be 



Equipment appropriations are approximately one- 
half what is needed. 

Around $375,000 more than is presently in the 
16 account will be required for rental space 
next fall. This is a new item based on bids 
just received for lease of additional space. 



COMMITTEE 



293 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Ryan commented on proposed use of additional 
rented space in the Armory and the Sawyer Building. He is hopeful 
of retaining third floor space in the Salada Building pending com- 
pletion of renovations to the other buildings. 

There vras discussion as to the proper course of action to 
pursue on the budget. Chairman Healey said a general instructior 
only was needed: to work for restoration to the budget of as much 
as possible of sums originally requested. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the acceptance of 
1968 State and Trust Fund Operating budgets. 

Treasurer Johnson submitted a proposal for a change in 
the dining commons fee . He explained the budget for the Boarding 
Hall and the operating problems of the past year. This year the 
Southwest dormitories will be filled, and with the approval of the 
proposed adjustment in fee, the budgets will be in balance for the 
coming year. 

Business Manager Grady commented that the Trustees might 
consider at some time adopting the policy now common throughout the 
country that all students who live on campus eat on campus. 

There was discussion, encompassing general campus policy 
on meals. After motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees an 
increase in the daily meal rate for the 
dining halls for three meals on Saturday 
and three meals on Sunday to the same 
rate as charged for the other days of 
the week: $2.75 a day effective in 
September, 1967. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:10 p.m. 



Til at Boston 

Temporary 

Space 




J 





Robert Z. McCartney 
Secretary, LBoard of Trustee^ 



Dining 
Commons Fee 



Increase in 
Meal Rate 



2932 



COMMITTEE 



UM at Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

June 26, 1967, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle, Trustees 
Gordon, Brown; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Miss Coulter. 



I 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION : 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Redfern, Business 
Manager Grady, Staff Assistant Myers, 
Mr. O'Brien; Mr. John Carl Warnecke, 
Mr. Wallace V. Cunneen, Jr. and Mr. 
A. Eugene Kohn, architects; Dean Paul 
Gagnoi\« 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 2:30 p.m. He 
stated that any Boston site proposal for the University must first 
be reviewed by State and City authorities. 

Mr. O'Brien was asked to describe the Allston site, which 
he is in the process of checking . He said it consists of about 50 
acres. This site borders the riverfront. It encompasses no homes; 
only a business district. Sasaki, Dawson & DeMay Associates are 
presently checking the location. 

Mr. Haigis stated, in accord with public statement the 
committee continues to accept and review possible sites. The July 
meeting of the committee will be devoted to discussion of the UM at 
Boston site, at which time site analyses are expected to be avail- 
able. 

The meeting advanced to the discussion of the acquisition 
of temporary space in Boston. 

Bids on fifteen properties had been received by the State 
Superintendent of Buildings on June 12, 1967. After discussion, 
motion was made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees leasing 

of the following spa^e: 

I3U UoiumDuo Ave., kevj-ttn Realty, Alternate #1, 
41,700 sq. ft., $4.295/sq.ft., $179,120 annual 
rent, for Locker, Storage and Library use; 

140 Berkeley St., Black & White Taxi, 150,000 
sq.ft., $3.90/sq.ft., $585,000 annual rent 
(excluding electricity) for Classroom, Study 
area, Cafeteria, Student Lounge, Bookstore, 
Student Activities and Student Affairs, and 
Faculty Offices. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson advised it would be necessary to 
request an additional appropriation of $385,000 to pay for this. 
It was thereupon moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a supplemental budget request be submitted 
to cover the cost of the rental of additional 
space for UM at Boston in an amount of $385,000. 

The Treasurer advised that the Tenant at Will Agreement 
on the Liberty Mutual Building was to expire July 1 and has been 
extended to October on the same terms. 

Chancellor Ryan advised that the agreement for the third 
floor of the Salada Building runs out shortly, and he would like to 
continue occupancy through the summer, possibly into October in 
order to provide suitable space until the other rental buildings 
are ready. 

Treasurer Johnson has discussed the matter of the Medical 
School office space with Dean Soutter, with the thought that funds 
could be supplied by the Medical School to rent offices. This 
group requires space in Boston to facilitate discussion with 
architects and other professional people concerned with the planning 
and construction of the Medical School. 



it was 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded and 



2P33 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize the Treasurer to negotiate 
appropriate contracts to extend the use of 
space in the Salada Building until other 
space is available, and to take appropriate 
action to secure office space for the Medical 
School. 

Mr. Warnecke of John Carl Warnecke and Associates, with 
his Vice President, Mr. Cunneen and Mr. Kohn joined the meeting. 

Descriptive brochures were distributed describing the 
Warnecke organization and graphically illustrating some of the 
building which this firm has planned and constructed. Mr. Warnecke, 
using slides, projected extensive examples of the worldwide experi- 
ence in varied types of construction. There was discussion between 
the members of the committee and Mr. Warnecke, who indicated he 
would be quite willing to work with Mr. Belluschi or any other 
master planning consultant named by the Designer Selection Board to 
assist in the development of UM at Boston. 

Basically, Mr. Warnecke' s architectural philosophy on 
urban universities was concerned with the development in metropoli- 
tan environments of the so-called "megastructure" a series of 
adjoining buildings constructed flexibly so that varied or different 



2934 



COMMITTEE 



George and 
Regina 
Gizienski 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

use of given units could be undertaken, for example, a decade from 
now should different institutional needs arise. 

The experience of the Warnecke firm encompassed many uni- 
versity buildings including the Stanford Undergraduate Library and 
a master plan for the new University of Virginia campus. 

Treasurer Johnson described a parcel of land, 2.68 acres 
more or less, presently owned by George and Regina Gizienski, 
located in Amherst and Hadley, adjacent to Highway #116, needed for 
University use. It was recommended that the request of the present 
owner for permission to enter the land from time to time to pump 
irrigation water from the creek located thereon, be granted. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

in accordance with Chapter 590, Acts of 1966, 
Item 8067-69, and other acts, authorizing 
the Trustees of the University to acquire 
land, or land with buildings thereon, by 
purchase or by eminent domain under Chapter 
79 of the General Laws, for the further 
development of the University; independent 
appraisals of the value of the land and 
buildings, if any, having been made by 
qualified disinterested appraisers and 
filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
the Trustees of the University purchase or 
take by eminent domain in fee, that portion, 
2.68 acres more or less, of the property of 
George and Regina Gizienski located in 
Amherst, and Hadley, Massachusetts which 
is adjacent to and east of Highway 116, and 
designated as parcel 2, Page 7B of the 
Amherst Town Atlas (1964), the parcel ex- 
tending into Hadley; and that the purchase 
price for said property to be One Thousand 
Five Hundred Sixty-Seven ($1,567.00) dollars. 

That, to the extent that the Trustees may be 
authorized in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 75 of the General Laws, Treasurer 
Kenneth W. Johnson is authorized to grant to 
George and Regina Gizienski, above named 
owners, permission to enter the above des- 
cribed land from time to time for the pur- 
pose of pumping irrigation water from the 
creek located thereon. 

The Treasurer described a parcel of land, the property of 
Florence Jekanowski and Josephine Werenski, consisting of 17.15 
acres, located in Hadley, on the easterly side of Route #116. 
Treasurer Johnson described the relevant value and location of the 



I 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

property as related to the University. Appraisals having been made 
by qualified appraisers, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
in accordance with chapter 59, Acts of 1966, 
Item 8067-69, authorizing the Trustees of 
the University to acquire land, or land with 
buildings thereon, by purchase or by eminent 
domain under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
for the further development of the University; 
independent appraisals of the value of the 
land and buildings, if any, having been made 
by qualified disinterested appraisers and 
filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
that the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, the 
property of Florecne B. Jekanowski and 
Josephine C. Werenski consisting of 17.15 
acres, more or less, and located in Hadley, 
Massachusetts on the easterly side of Route 
#116, the southerly side of land now or 
formerly owned by Peter 0. Ostrowski, the 
northerly and westerly sides of land owned 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and 
that the purchase price for said property be 
Fifteen Thousand Five Hundred ($15,500.00) 
dollars . 

The Treasurer advised that the acquisition of the Paul 
Winkler property is still under consideration. An offer has been 
made based on the appraisals and word is awaited from Mr. Winkler 
prior to the start of taking proceedings. 

Plans for additional development of the Physical Education 
playing fields were described. This would require moving the beef 
cattle barn to Deerfield; the sheep would then be moved to the 
former beef area, 
it was 



After discussion, motion was made, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the plans and specifications for the 
Physical Education fields as prepared by 
Gordon Ainsworth and Associates be approved 
and that arrangements be made to move the 
sheep and swine to other locations. 

The Treasurer noted that background material on Mr. 
Murray D. Lincoln, Class of 1914, had been supplied to the committee 
(attached). After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the new Campus Center be named the Murray 
Lincoln Campus Center in honor of this late, 
distinguished alumnus of the University. 



2935 



Florence B. 
Jekanowski and 
Josephine C. 
Werenski 
Property 



Winkler 
Property 



Physical 

Education 

Fields 



Murray Lincoln 
Campus Center 



2936 



COMMITTEE 



Experimental 
Biology 
Laboratory, 
Wareham 



Architects, 
UM at Boston 



Governor's 
Capital Outlay 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The plans for the new research building at Wareham were 
described by the Treasurer. Plans and specifications were shown. 
After discussion, a motion was made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that plans and specifications for the 
Experimental Biology Laboratory at 
Wareham be approved. 

The Treasurer informed the committee of the activities 
to date of the Designer Selection Board, stating the Board has 
interviewed the following firms and individuals as potential 
architects and/or master plan consultants for the development of 
UM at Boston: 

Architects uoilaborative of Oambrj.uge 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay & Associates of Watertown 
P. Belluschi of Boston 
Harry Wiess of Chicago 

John Carl Warnecke & Associates of San Francisco, 
Washington, and New York 

The selection Board indicated it would welcome further 
recommendations from the Trustees. Marcel Breuer and others will 
be interviewed at a later date. 

Mr. Johnson has informed the Designer Selection Board 
that Dr. Belluschi is our first choice. 

Treasurer Johnson also reported on his talk with Gordon 
Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owens and Mayer with respect to the above 
project. Mr. Bunshaft was too busy and declined. 

Copies of the Governor's Capital Outlay budget for the 
University totaling $18,765,000 were distributed (attached). This 
is in addition to the $45,000,000 for the Medical School already 
appropriated this year. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:35 p.m. 



I 





J. McCartney 
Board of Trustees 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

August 7, 1967, 10:30 a.m., Chancellor's Conference Room, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Lyons, 
Croce, Plimpton, Rowland, Green- 
blatt; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



ALSO 

PRESENT : Chancellor 



Chancellor Ryan, Acting Dean Gagnon; 
Dean Soutter, Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. 

Dean Gagnon presented the proposed program of curricular 
development for the University of Massachusetts at Boston. He 
stated this course material had been considered by the Faculty 
Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate and also by the Chancellor' 
Office. In general there is a close relationship between these 
proposals and major requirements at the Amherst campus of the Uni- 
versity. Outline of requirements of each major department for stu- 
dents pursuing degrees in each specialization were supplied to the 
committee (Document T68-003). 

The President cautioned against adopting a schedule of 
courses exceeding the capacity of the staff to man and teach them. 
He referred to the prescribed 15-1 student-teacher ratio. 

Chancellor Ryan stated the schedule for the semester 
must be worked out within the 15-1 ratio, and that two things stand 
behind the requirements for this curricula: (1) the course may be 
listed but not taught - in the event of lack of student interest 
(2) the course may be listed but not offered - due to non-availa- 
bility of faculty. The Chancellor anticipates the new junior 
offerings will be well filled. Dean Gagnon stated there are 855 
pre-registrations for upper classes, among students moving from 
sophomore to junior class and it is expected there will be about 
150 transfers. Spread over all advanced courses proposed this 
would average 18-20 students per section. 

There was discussion of the departmental major require- 
ments and Dean Gagnon presented new courses proposed for 1967-68 
to fill the junior-senior needs in each department. 

The members of the committee were supplied with detailed 
supporting material (Document T68-004) and a summary of the 
numbers of courses to be offered. The large increase from the 
1966-67 offerings, Dean Gagnon said, reflected the addition of a 
junior class, a number of seniors, and the need to provide upper- 
level courses of considerable variety to satisfy major requirements 
developed by the faculty. It is expected that few courses will be 
added in 1968-69, consistent with the University policy of avoiding 



293 



w" 



Curricular 
Development 
UM at Boston 



New Courses 
1967-68 



2938 



Courses 
Discontinued 



COMMITTEE 



Partition 
Social Rela- 
tions Depart- 
ment into De- 
partment of 
Psychology & 
Department of 
Sociology- 
Anthropology 



Departmental- 



ization 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proliferation of specialized offerings. The summary indicated a 
total of 250 semester courses, compared to 136 offered previously. 

A listing of courses to be discontinued (Document T68-005) 
was reviewed and discussed. 

There was discussion, following a query by Trustee 
Greenblatt, of the practice of instructors teaching oil both 
campuses. Chancellor Ryan advised that this has been considered, 
but not yet adopted. The President stated we should focus on this 
a little more. At the time a graduate level program is offered, 
Chancellor Ryan said, it could be that some of this work would be 
done in Amherst and some in Boston. 

Dean Gagnon advised that currently of the 855 pre- 
registered students, 250 indicated major in humanities, 385 social 
sciences, 120 natural sciences, 100 mathematics; this does not in- 
clude the expected transfers. In addition, 150 of these students 
are also preparing for state teachers requirements - elementary or 
secondary level. 

Dean Gagnon explained that the partition of the Social 
Relations Department into the Department of Psychology and Depart- 
ment of Sociology-Anthropology is now desirable partly because of 
a change in personnel. Returning to the traditional division be- 
tween these two groups is more compatible with the current situation 
Introductory courses will be called Social Relations as before, and 
taught by the two staffs working together. 

President Lederle noted that this indicated a trend in the 
direction of departmentalization. He asked Chancellor Ryan to 
elaborate on this development. 

Chancellor Ryan stated that the University at Boston does 
not now have departments in the formal sense, but new recruits, due 
to previous associations (graduate schools, professional societies, 
etc.) think of themselves as members of a department. He stated 
he was in favor or organization of University of Massachusetts at 
Boston on a department basis and operating in this way where appro- 
priate. Super specialization and super compartmentalization, as 
well as fractionalizing of the faculty, will be avoided. 

The Chancellor indicated the direction recommended today 
is to establish a number of subject-matter areas into departments, 
with chairmen and their own committees. Division structure will be 
preserved as a cementing agent. 

Dean Gagnon noted that to give the division meaning, it 
is necessary to leave a good deal of authority in the hands of the 
Chairman - for example, faculty recruitment and budgets. De- 
centralization of administration would result. Cohesive academic 
units to think out and develop programs would result. The ad- 
ministrative detail can be better handled by a division chairman who 
is at least two steps closer to his constitutent departments than a 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



dean would be. It is, 
the administration. 



in fact, a device to change the nature of 



Chancellor Ryan stated that, at a later date, a 
recommendation would be submitted to the Trustees to organize a 
specific number of areas as departments and appoint the various 
persons as chairmen. He noted there will be three divisions, in 
place of the four now established, since Math will be included 
with the Humanities. These divisions will be: Humanities, Social 
Sciences, Natural Sciences. The recommended framework, manner of 
operation and functions of the chairmen will be clarified in a 
later presentation. 

It is expected that a division chairman could also teach. 
The Chancellor said it is inevitable that, as the program grows, 
additional administrative personnel will be required so that 
valuable teaching time will be released. In addition, it may be 
necessary to provide released time to chairmen of some of the 
large departments because of the increased size of the department 
with attendant administrative responsibilities. 

On the question of rotating department chairmanships, 
Chancellor Ryan commented that an appointed chairman would be a 
possibility, with a three-year term. This would take the burden 
of administrative work off the professional teacher. The 
Chancellor said he would always consult with his faculty before 
presenting any name to the President and the Trustees. 

Dean Gagnon submitted a preliminary report on the Teacher 
Certification Program. He informed the committee that 260 students 
have expressed interest in teaching elementary school; 150 of these 
are juniors. The Dean advised that the statutory requirements of 
the Commonwealth are relatively liberal and can be met by courses 
regularly offered. Search has been instituted for an administrator 
to coordinate the program with special reference to the practice 
teaching program. None of the candidates has been found suitable 
to date. In view of this a qualified capable regular member of 
the department of English has been appointed as Acting Coordinator: 
Mr. Alex Campbell. The Dean outlined Mr. Campbell's qualifications 
briefly, including his teaching experience and scholastic back- 
ground. It was noted that this approach represents a simple ver- 
sion of Dr. Conant's recommendation that universities prepare 
teachers basically out of general curriculum and reserve the senior 
year for methodology. 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



2939 



Teacher 

Certification 

Program 



2940 



COMMITTEE 

Approval 

UM at Boston 

Department 

Structure 



UM at Boston 
Faculty-staff 
sources; 
bibliography 



Medical 
School 
Candidate, 
Department of 
Bio- chemistry 



Charter for 
Student 

Freedom 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the Department structure, as 
submitted by UM at Boston 



Document T68-003 - 
Document T68-004 - 

Document T68-005 - 



Departmental major re- 
quirements 

New courses proposed for 
1967-68 to fill Junior- 
Senior needs in each de- 
partment 
Courses to be discontinued 



A listing of the sources of the University of Massachu- 
setts at Boston faculty and staff was supplied to the members of the 
committee, with a partial bibliography of the faculty. The Dean 
noted that recruitment has been greatly aided by the location of the 
University in the Boston-Cambridge education-research complex. He 
called attention to the wide flung areas of the country represented 
by the faculty. The Chairman said he was enormously impressed with 
the breadth of experience and academic attainment of the UM at 
Boston faculty. 

Trustee Lyons entered into the record the committee's 
satisfaction with the Dean's report. 

Dean Soutter was invited to describe a distinguished can- 
didate for Professor and Chairman of the Department of Bio- 
chemistry, for the School of Medicine. After discussion, Chairman 
Troy expressed the committee's interest and favorable impression of 
the candidate and encouraged Dean Soutter to proceed with further 
negotiations. 

President Lederle informally advised the meeting that a 
Charter for Student Freedoms was under consideration, and that con- 
versely there should be a Charter of Student responsibilities. He 
stated the basic problem is to develop a fair and equitable process 
for administering discipline. A student-faculty committee has been 
working on an improved student disciplinary code which will be im- 
plemented this fall. The court system is quite complicated, he 
said, and it will be submitted to Attorney Broadhurst for review and 
comment prior to presentation to the Trustees. The President said 
the Student-Faculty recommendations will be finalized through the 
Committee on Student Activities sometime during the next academic 
year. The Association of Governing Boards meeting in Washington 
will discuss similar matters at a meeting in Washington in the fall. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 




Robert J A 
Secretai 




cCartney 
Board of Trusl 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

August 7, 1967, 12 Noon, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Thompson; also, Trustees Croce* and 
Plimpton*; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Ad hoc members for Medical Affairs 



Dean Soutter; Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Mr. O'Brien of UM at Boston; Director 
of Physical Plant Hugill and Mr. 
Martin Nelson; also, Appraisers J. C. 
Brody, John Tehan and Archie Home. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Haigis at 
12:45 p.m. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a report on progress in ac- 
quiring the Shaw building and property adjacent to the Medical 
School in Worcester. This property is currently owned by Henry 
and Alyce Jacobs and Mr. Samuel Pearlman of Boston. Title to this 
property is reported to be in contest. 

Three appraisals have been received, each arrived at in- 
dependently and are on file with the Treasurer. 

It was noted that the appraisals were arrived at in part 
by taking into account an estimate of replacement cost. Discussion 
followed. Dean Soutter observed that the Medical School would re- 
quire a location to house faculty and certain kinds of storage 
while the school was in the construction phase. The property could 
also be used, if necessary, to teach the first class until perma- 
nent buildings became available. Messrs. Brody, Tehan and Home, 
the three appraisers, were introduced to the committee and made 
themselves available for questioning. In addition to other con- 
siderations, the appraisers had based their valuation on rental 
averages in the Worcester area. The Shaw Building is approximately 
16 years old and has 44,000 square feet of gross space. Present 
assessment is $256,800 on land and building. The land area amounts 
to 117,037 square feet. The building is completely air conditioned 
It is heated by forced hot water in the front section and forced 
hot air in rented rear sections, plus a third, separate heating 
system. 

Discussion brought out that the current construction rate 
for a similar building is $20 to $22 per square foot (front 
section) ; but the rear section (warehouse space) may now be con- 
structed for an average of $14.85 per square foot. Original cost 
of the building was approximately $600,000. 



2941 



Acquisition 
of Shaw 
Building - 
Worcester 



2942 



COMMITTEE 



Pinney 
Realty 
Property 



Approval of 

Medical 

School 

Building - 

Preliminary 

Plans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After further discussion, in conformance with the 
recommendation of the Treasurer, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimous ly 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that, in accordance with Chapter 276 
Item 8067-98 of the Acts of 1967, and 
all other acts, authorizing the Trustees 
of the University to acquire land, or 
land with buildings thereon, by purchase 
or by eminent domain under Chapter 79 of 
the General Laws, for the development of 
the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School in the City of Worcester; inde- 
pendent appraisals having been made by 
qualified disinterested appraisers and 
filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, a 
parcel of land now or formerly the Pinney 
Realty Corporation property as shown on 
a plan entitled "Land in Worcester 
(Worcester Co.) Mass." Surveyed by 
Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, Inc., 
May 18, 1967; and that the purchase 
price for said property be $500,000. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Soutter described 
the basic plan for the Medical School building. This plan calls for 
two wings -- one for the basic sciences, the second for the clinical 
sciences with a third wing extended to include student laboratories 
and student lecture halls on floors stacked one above the other. 
The library connects at one floor only. 

Space in the Medical School building has been allocated 
at the rate of 720 square feet per faculty member, with 1,000 square 
feet allocated for chairmen of departments. The animal quarters 
designed in collaboration with a veterinarian, will be housed in 
the basement. Presently, the space allocation is uniform for each 
department; later on certain changes may have to be made. 

Dean Soutter advised the committee that Federal authori- 
ties had raised certain questions: 

1. Why place the lecture halls next to the hospital? 

2. Why so many seats in the lecture halls (178)? 

3. Why so many laboratories? 

The Dean noted that there were practical answers for all 
of these questions. For example, with the possibility of expanding 
the enrollment of the Medical School at a later date, it is far 
simpler at this time to plan additional lecture hall seats than to 
attempt to renovate within a few years. It was agreed that the 



r 



i 



i 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Federal government would fund the project for 120 seat lecture 
halls and the Medical School would assume the cost of the extra 58 
seats. 

Dean Soutter stated that the exterior of the building 
will be quite handsome, particularly the library. The outside 
finish will be pre-fabricated limestone. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that the cost estimates have 
risen. The Bureau of Building Construction, he said, assumes that 
the project may be approximately $1,615,000 over the appropriations 
at present. On the other hand, there is still novalid information 
on this, or a solid basis for any estimate. From this time forward 
weekly meetings will be held with the architects who will be ex- 
pected to keep a running total of cost estimates in the future. 
Dean Soutter observed that the University will need to obtain 18 
million dollars in Federal grants on the Medical School building 
as well as 20 million on the hospital, otherwise the project will 
be in difficulty. 

President Lederle warned the committee that the current 
legislative policy is to absorb any increase in Federal allocation 
of funds while, at the same time, keeping the original cost ceil- 
ing on- any given project. Dean Soutter added that the thing most 
to be feared is limited Federal participation. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded 
and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they approve the preliminary plans 
with corrections as noted thereon for 
the Medical School as presented by Dean 
Soutter, and as drawn by the architectural 
firms of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, 
Ritchie Associates and Ellerbe. 

Discussion turned to costs and other factors effecting a 
choice of energy source for heating the Medical School and Hospital 
Complex. Francis Associates are the engineers working with the 
architects in this matter. 

Dean Soutter presented the following figures as compara- 
tive estimated costs for heating the Medical School singly; also 
for the combined Medical School and Hospital utilizing either 
electricity or oil-gas: 



Medical School -- -- 



Combined Medical 
School & Hospital 



$893,511 electricity 
$586,843 oil-gas 



$1,565,000 electricity 
$1,059,000 oil-gas 



2943 



Energy Source 
for the 

Medical School 
- Hospital 
Complex in 
Worcester 



2944 



COMMITTEE 



Demolishment 
of Buildings 
at Medical 
School Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Director of Physical Plant Hugill observed that, if the 
buildings were heated electrically, there would be a need for a 
large number of auxiliary standby generators. He added that the 
basic power under consideration was gas alternating with oil. A 
question remains whether plans should be made to heat with hot 
water or high pressure steam, or a combination of both; also, what 
to utilize for standby purposes in case of emergency. Mr. Hugill 
informed the committee that his department could not recommend or 
justify going to all electric heat. He stated that an incinerator 
stack must be constructed in any case to provide for the disposal 
of trash to conform to the State Department of Public Health regu- 
lations banning completely any pollution of the atmosphere. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that, if things proceed on 
schedule, the plans and specifications for the Medical School must 
be completed by May 3, 1968 and put out to bid on July 1, 1968. 

Discussion followed on the practicability of installing 
all electric heat in view of a possible, future lower cost due to 
supply from atomically powered electrical plants. 

Mr. Hugill stated that, in order to make all electric 
heating practical, the cost would have to be brought down to 1c per 
KW hour before the figures became competitive with steam. He 
doubted that this could be realized within a ten-year period. 

The Treasurer noted that the cost to the Commonwealth will 
be approximately $150,000 higher per year to heat by electricity for 
the foreseeable future. Dean Soutter added that all electric heat- 
ing would require the University to have an enormous oil or gas- 
fired generating plant available on a standby basis for emergencies. 
It was stressed, however, that the Medical School was not building 
a "total disaster" facility. Standby facilities would be available 
to meet normal emergencies. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they approve a combination gas-oil 
energy source for the Medical School - 
Hospital Complex in Worcester with steam 
as the source of heat. 

Dean Soutter reminded the committee that the Board of 
Trustees had approved the demolishment of certain farm buildings on 
the site of the Medical School in Worcester at the earliest possible 
date. He stated that the Department of Mental Health now wishes to 
keep farm animals on the land, pending start of construction next 
spring. 

Afer brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



I 



I 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they demolish the farm buildings 
on the Medical School site in Worcester 
as a part of the construction contract 
when site work begins in the summer of 
1968. 

Dean Soutter informed the committee of certain diffi- 
culties experienced with the architects getting things done on 
time; also keeping plans firm, once they were agreed upon. Chair- 
man Haigis agreed to pursue this matter further with the architects 
and at the State level. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that it is expected that the 
Graduate Research Center, which will go out to bid this fall, is 
now about 2 million dollars over the original cost estimate. It is 
planned to make up this sum out of building equipment. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they accept the final plans for 
the Graduate Research Center as pre- 
sented by the architectural firm of 
Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that agreement had been reached 
with Dean Spielman of the College of Agriculture to move the sheep 
and swine from its present location to the Tillson Farm and other 
renovated farm buildings at a cost of approximately $35,000. This 
will clear the way to proceed with development of the Physical 
Education Fields planned for this area. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they approve the plans for develop- 
ment of Physical Education Playing Fields 
as detailed in documents on file in the 
Office of the Treasurer. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the committee that the Board 
of Trustees had approved a prior award of $75,000 for the purchase 
of the property of Paul Winkler, adjacent to the campus in Amherst. 
This offer has been declined by Mr. Winkler. The Treasurer stated 
that the average of the appraisals, plus 107» allowable under State 
procedures, amounts to $82,500. It is not certain whether 
Mr. Winkler will accept an offer at this figure. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 



2945 



Admonishment 
to Architects 



Approval of 
Final Plans - 
Graduate Re- 
search Center 



Approval of 
plans - 
Physical 
Education 
Fields 



Land 

Acquisition 

Amherst 



2946 



Winkler 
Property 



COMMITTEE 



Waskiewicz 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 590 Acts of 
1966 Item 8067-69, and other Acts 
authorizing the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity to acquire land, or land with 
buildings thereon, by purchase or by 
eminent domain under Chapter 79 of the 
General Laws, for the further develop- 
ment of the University; independent 
appraisals of the value of the land and 
buildings, if any, having been made by 
qualified disinterested appraisers and 
filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
that the Trustees of the University pur- 
chase or take by eminent domain in fee, 
the property, of Paul K. Winkler, consist- 
ing of 23.95 acres, more or less, located 
in Amherst, Massachusetts, and described 
as a parcel of land lying northerly of 
Eastman Lane, a Town way, and westerly 
of East Pleasant Street, a Town way; 
said parcel being a portion of that 
described in Book 1459 at Page 254 of 
the Hampshire County Registry of Deeds; 
and that the purchase price for said 
property be Eighty Two Thousand Five 
Hundred ($82,500.00) dollars. 

The Treasurer next described a parcel of land near the 
University Stadium, valued at $13,500. He noted that the University 
required this property in order to even out boundary lines in the 
Stadium area parking complex. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 544 Acts of 
1961 Item 8262-12 and other Acts 
authorizing the Trustees of the Univers- 
sity to acquire land, or land with build- 
ings thereon, by purchase or by eminent 
domain under Chapter 79 of the General 
Laws, for the further development of the 
University; independent appraisals of the 
value of the land and buildings if any, 
having been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and filed with Kenneth W. 
Johnson, Treasurer; that the Trustees; of 
the University purchase or take by eminent 
domain in fee, the property of Edward T. 
Waskiewicz (supposed owner), consisting of 
0.72 acres, more or less, located in 
Amherst, Massachusetts, on the north side 
of Amity Street and east of the Amherst- 
Hadley Town Line; said parcel being that 



I 



( 



II 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

described as Parcel 14, Page 13B of the 
Amherst Town Atlas (1964) ; and that the 
purchase price for said property be 
Thirteen Thousand Five Hundred ($13,500.00) 
dollars. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the committee that prior 
discussion had occurred on a proposed exchange of property with 
Miss Ruth Mclntire. It is Miss Mclntire's wish that the Univer- 
sity maintain in perpetuity as a woodland park a parcel of land 
which she proposes to deed to the University in exchange for a 
small parcel of land now owned by the University which she would 
require to complete the boundaries of an area where she intends to 
build a home. Miss Mclntire now requests that land owned by the 
University adjacent to the parcel of land which she would deed also 
be designated as a part of the "woodland park". 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept from H. Ruth Mclntire, a par- 
cel of woodland consisting of 71,419 sq. ft., 
more or less, and described as Parcel B on 
a plan entitled "Three Parcels of Land in 
Amherst, Mass." Surveyed for the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts for the use of the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
prepared by Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, 
Inc. and dated June 26, 1967; and that in 
accepting this property, the Trustees affirm 
their intention to maintain it as a natural 
woodland park, together with certain other 
University land adjacent thereto, in memory 
of Presidents Baker and Van Meter and Pro- 
fessor Vinal; to keep the area free from 
litter and debris, and to provide necessary 
care for the growth of indigenous trees and 
shrubs. That the Trustees sell and convey 
in the name of and for the Commonwealth, to 
H. Ruth Mclntire, a professor of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, for the consideration 
of property stipulated above, a strip of land 
approximately 100 feet by 150 feet containing 
15,531 sq. ft. more or less and described as 
Parcel C on the plan stipulated above; with 
the provision that said land be used only as 
a private residence. 

The Treasurer stated that the bringing of the boulevard 
from its present terminus near the southwest residence hall complex 
to North Pleasant Street would infringe on "Parcel A" of the 
Baptist Church on North Pleasant Street, as designated in a plan 
which was shown to the committee. The Baptist Church proposes to 



294' 



Mclntire 
Property 



2948 



COMMITTEE 



Gift of Land 
from the 
Baptist Church 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

deed "Parcel A" to the University in exchange for our providing them 
right of access across our parking lot to their own parking lot 
adjacent to the church. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept from The First Baptist Church 
of Amherst, a religious corporation duly 
established by law, a parcel of land in 
Amherst, Massachusetts, located on the 
westerly side of North Pleasant Street, 
and more particularly bounded and described 
as follows: ' 

Beginning at an iron pipe in the westerly 
sideline of North Pleasant Street, said pipe 
marking the northeasterly corner of the 
parcel described herein and being further 
S 19° 33' 19" E a distance of 134.38 feet 
from a bound marking an angle point in said 
westerly sideline; thence S 19 33' 19" E 
along the westerly sideline of North Pleasant 
Street a distance of 94.19 feet to a point; 
thence northerly on a curve to the left of 
radius 289.425 feet an arc length of 97.60 
feet to a point, along land of the grantor 
herein; thence N 67 32* 05" E along land 
of the grantee herein a distance of 29.03 
feet to the point of beginning and contain- 
ing 1099 square feet. 

The parcel described above is more completely 
shown as Parcel "A" on a plan entitled "Plan 
of Land in Amherst, Mass. to be acquired by 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts" made by 
Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, Inc. dated 
May 2, 1967 to be recorded herewith. 

^To 3 recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

VOTED : To the extent that the Trustees may be 

authorized in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 75 of the General Laws of Massa- 
chusetts, permission is hereby granted to 
The First Baptist Church of Amherst, a re- 
ligious corporation, its successors or assigns, 
their agents and servants, to use a certain 
parcel of land designated as Parcel C on a 
plan entitled "Plan of Land in Amherst, Mass. 
to be acquired by the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts for the use of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts" made by Gordon E. 



r 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



] 



2949 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Ainsworth & Associates, Inc., dated May 2, 
1967, and to have access in common with 
others, from said property of the owners, 
to a road designated as P-3 on a plan en- 
titled "Road Construction I University of 
Massachusetts, Drawing Number 8 of U.M. 
64-1, Contract No. 4", made by Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. dated 
January 28, 1966, particularly for the pur- 
pose of passing and repassing over the same 
with motor vehicles. 

The Treasurer next explained that a similar infringement 
on Newman Center property would be caused by the bringing of the 
boulevard to North Pleasant Street. The Newman Center has re- 
quested the University to deed to them "Parcel C" in exchange for 
Parcel "A" as shown on a map displayed to the committee and 
attached herewith. It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept from The Roman Catholic Bishop 
of Springfield, a corporation sole, under 
Chapter 368 of the Acts of 1898, a parcel 
of land in Amherst, Massachusetts, located 
on the westerly side of North Pleasant 
Street, and more particularly bounded and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at a flush gun barrel in the 
westerly sideline of North Pleasant Street, 
said gun barrel being northerly on a curve 
to the left of radius 761.07 feet an arc 
length of 46.08 feet from a concrete bound 
marking a point of tangency in said westerly 
sideline and said point of beginning marking 
the southeasterly corner of the parcel de- 
scribed herein; thence S 73 35' 40" W along 
land of the grantee herein a distance of 
26.00 feet to a point; thence northerly on 
a curve to the left of radius 300.00 feet 
along land of the grantor herein an arc length 
of 88.86 feet to a point; thence southerly on 
a curve to the right of radius 761.07 feet 
along the westerly sideline of North Pleasant 
Street an arc length of 87.64 feet to the 
point of beginning and containing 1011 square 
feet, being designated as Parcel A on a plan 
entitled, "Plan of Land in Amherst, Mass. to 
be acquired by The Commonwealth of Massachusetts," 
made by Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, Inc. 
dated May 3, 1967, and revised May 25, 1967, 
to be recorded in the Hampshire County Registry 
of Deeds. 



Deed of Land 
to Newman 
Center 



2950 



COMMITTEE 



Progress 
Report - 
Campus 
Center 



Revised 
Traffic 
Rules and 
Regulations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To the extent that the Trustees may be 
authorized in accordance with the pro- 
vision of Chapter 75 of the General Laws 
of Massachusetts and in consideration for 
land granted in the preceding paragraph, 
the Trustees grant to The Newman Club at 
the University of Massachusetts, Inc., an 
association established at the University, 
with Quitclaim covenants, a certain parcel 
of land designated as Parcel C on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land in Amherst, Mass. 
to be acquired by The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for the use of the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts" made 
by Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, Inc., 
dated May 3, 1967. Treasurer Kenneth W. 
Johnson is authorized to sign the deed 
and transfer of title on behalf of the 
Board of Trustees 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the low bid on the Campus 
Center of $11,273,527 entered by Daniel O'Connell and Sons, is 
$1,900,000 over the original cost estimate. The University Build- 
ing Authority is working to bring this matter into line. If the 
foundation area is sufficiently dry, it will be possible to save 
approximately $311,000 in revised type of construction at that 
point. There is also the possibility of significant cost saving by 
a shift in the building's exterior finish. 

The Treasurer advised the committee that the next action 
on the Campus Center will be a management and services agreement to 
be provided for their consideration, along with a proposal for trans 
fer of the Student Union to the University Building Authority. 

The Treasurer distributed to the committee copies of 
proposed revisions in the Motor Vehicle Regulations of the Universit} 
These proposals are set forth in Document T68-002 which is hereby 
attached to and made a part of these minutes, and which will now be 
forwarded to the Board of Trustees for their information and review. 

The Treasurer stated that, beginning this fall, the 
University will be working toward a completely pedestrian campus. 
He displayed a map showing shaded parking areas numbered from one 
to six, where entrance will be controlled by a guard. Every staff 
member will have an assigned lot near where he or she is working. 
Student parking lots will be at the periphery of the campus. 

With respect to the proposed changes in the regulations 
the Treasurer stated that nothing major was being proposed except for 
a change in disciplinary action detailed on the last page under 
Article VII section 5. This provides that - 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"In addition to fines and penalties imposed 
or any other action taken by the courts of 
the Commonwealth, repeated violations of the 
State or University motor vehicle laws or 
regulations shall subject the offender to 
the same disciplinary action, including 
suspension or expulsion from the University, 
as would be taken for a violation of other 
University regulations governing the general 
conduct of its students." 

The Treasurer noted that the parking lots under guard 
would be covered only during the day and for special events at 
night. At other times the lots would be open. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the amendments to the Motor Vehicle 
Regulations of the University as indi- 
cated in Document T68-002 be approved. 

In conclusion, the Treasurer provided to the committee a 
confidential list of firms which had applied to the Designer Se- 
lection Board for consideration with respect to the master plan 
for the University of Massachusetts at Boston and action taken 
thereon. (attached confidential list) 

A brief discussion followed on the progress of the site 
search for a permanent campus for the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary, Bo 



artney 

of Trustees 




295 1 



UM at Boston 
Site - 
Progress Report 



2952 



COMMITTEE 



Student 
Union Fee 
Campus 
Center 



Parking 
Garage 



Transfer of 
Student 
Union to 
Building 
Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
August 31, 1967, 12:00 Noon, Chancellor's Conference Room, UM/B 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Vice Chairman Healey; Trustees 
Emerson, Lyons, Pumphret, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Redfern, 
Dean Field, Planning Officer 
Littlefield, Assistant to the 
Treasurer Kittle, Miss Coulter. 



Acting Chairman Healey convened the meeting in the Con- 
ference Room of the University at Boston. 

The first item on the agenda was the Campus Center. 
Treasurer Johnson advised that the Student Union fee of $30, to be- 
come effective next September, is nominal in terms of that charged 
by other schools and that an increase of $5 in this fee, effective 
in September 1971, will be recommended at an appropriate time. The 
Treasurer advised that starting this fall, Student Union fee 
collections coming in from students will be reserved for debt ser- 
vice to the Campus Center and Student Union combined. A fee to be 
charged to adults using the Center for conference purposes will also 
be available for debt service. Income from the Center food service, 
bookstore, room rentals, etc. will cover maintenance and operation 
of the building. The Treasurer supplied the members of the 
committee with copies of a detailed schedule showing cost and 
projected use and revenue for the Campus Center and Parking Garage. 

The legal work for the transfer of the Student Union to 
the Building Authority is being prepared by Attorney Broadhurst, 
the Treasurer stated. He advised the committee that under an 
arrangement established with the Ways and Means Committee at the 
time the Student Union building was constructed, the State has paid 
for the upkeep of the structure as well as heat, light, water, etc. 
and that the Student Union Fund has provided for such upkeep and 
maintenance service as redecorating, new furniture, etc. This was 
to off-set the academic and university-wide use of the Union rather 
than billing the state for rental of space in the Student Union for 
convocations, University functions, and academic activities. 
Attorney Broadhurst believes it appropriate to incorporate a similar 
provision in the new Center agreement, rather than expecting the 
students to amortize this University-wide usage. 

There was discussion. The Treasurer said charges can be 
increased when and if the need dictates. One example is the con- 
ference fee, which presently is a nominal $1.00 per head. 
Logically this could be increased. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee next considered the Parking Garage which 
is projected to cost $3,496,000. The anticipated revenue at 
various rates of turnover was discussed. The Treasurer supplied 
detailed projections indicating that of the available spaces, 270 
would be reserved for faculty and staff on a long-term lease basis 
($100 year/ $80 ten month appointment/ $10 month for summer 
appointment, or an equivalent of 27c a day.) Short-term parking 
for students, staff and faculty in the remaining 730 spaces is 
projected at a cost of 10c per hour; visitors and conferees, at 
50c first hour, 15c each additional hour, $2.00 per day maximum. 

The revenue, based on scales of usage, is calculated to 
provide adequate income for amortization. (See Document T68-006 
attached. ) 

The Treasurer said it is expected there will be a turn- 
over during the course of a day, possibly as high as two or three 
times and that occupancy of 70-80 percent will be assured on the 
lease space. This will provide over $400,000 a year income rather 
than $235,000 as projected conservatively in Document T68-007 
attached. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the campus for the first time 
this fall will become a strictly pedestrian campus. Only those 
cars bearing a special decal for assigned lots will be permitted to 
park on campus; others will park in the large lots on the 
periphery of the campus. Parking spaces are to be assigned and 
guards will supervise entrance to the lots. The Treasurer said 
this plan has been reviewed by the Campus Master Planning 
Committee and the Faculty Senate. The general consensus was that 
the faculty would be willing to pay for parking in lots if they 
were guaranteed a space. However, at this time it is not proposed 
to levy a charge on present faculty parking in assigned lots. The 
charges will be levied only for parking in the garage. 

The Treasurer expressed the hope that this new parking 
plan will eliminate the very acute problem of illegal campus park- 
ing which has necessitated towing of cars and created a serious 
public relations problem. 

In summary, the Treasurer said figures from student fees 
and minimum anticipated revenues from the parking garage have been 
combined to provide a total of expected revenue. Considerations 
taken into account include: 

(1) Projected growth of 1500 students per year. 

(2) Increase of present Student Union fee by 
$5.00 effective in September 1971. 

(3) Projected total growth to 25,000 students, 
with 22,500 actually paying fee, by 1972-75. 



2953 



Parking 
Garage - 
use and 
revenue 



Campus 
Parking 



Summary 



2954 



COMMITTEE 



Campus 
Center 



Campus 
Center - 
Student 
Use 



Campus 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

This then will produce enough revenue to amortize the total Campus 
Center - Parking Garage complex of $16,620,000 on an estimated 
financing of 31 payment 4%7 a bonds. 

The Treasurer pointed out that even if the enrollment did 
not reach the anticipated level of 25,000 students, the project 
could still be amortized by increasing fees. The fees presently 
proposed are nominal in comparison with some of those presently 
assessed at other universities. 

There was discussion and clarification of the numbers of 
students vs. conferees projected as users of the Campus Center as 
a whole. Dean Field stated an average of 66% student use could be 
expected - higher on special weekends. The Dean said the structure 
will be flexible, moving back and forth between student and con- 
ference use. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the committee that the cost of 
the Campus Center has risen substantially, due to the general in- 
crease in construction costs. 

The committee emphasized in general that this is to be a 
student building and they should have the principal use of it for 
their functions. A lesser part of the whole concept is the con- 
ference and continuing education use. Trustees Healey and Pumphret 
stressed that "carrying the load" of the structure should not be 
put over onto the student tax base. 

Treasurer Johnson stated the students have concern that the: 
Student Fee not be used to amortize the parking garage; they have 
been assured it will not be. 

Trustee Pumphret, speaking for the Building Authority, 
said the Authority is now pressing its $60,000,000 ceiling on the 
funding of new projects. He suggested that in order to expedite 
signing of pending construction contracts, required by September 6, 
the garage be temporarily eliminated from the authorizing vote of 
the Trustees (January 31, 1967). The garage will be submitted 
separately for approval at a later date, when legislation authorizing 
a higher ceiling is passed. Hopefully, this will occur before the 
next meeting of the Trustees on September 14, 1967. 

There was considerable discussion encompassing the inten- 
sive efforts made by the administration in combination with the 
architects and builder to reduce the cost of the proposed structure. 
Trustee Pumphret stated the Authority has received tremendous 
cooperation from the administration and that this building more than 
any other is a result of mutual participation between the administra 
tion, the architect and the Building Authority. 

It was then moved, seconded and 



] 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



295." 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That the reduction in the scope 

of the Eleventh Project of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building 
Authority proposed by the letter of 
the Authority dated August 29, 1967 
and presented to this meeting be and 
hereby is approved, authorized and 
concurred in and that Joseph P. 
Healey, Acting Chairman of the 
Executive Committee, be and he here- 
by is authorized to endorse said 
letter to evidence the written con- 
currence of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts in said 
proposed reduction. 

It was decided to defer consideration of the agenda item 
on transfer of the Student Union to the Building Authority until a 
detailed, documented background memo could be prepared and distri- 
buted to the Trustees for their study and review. Following this, 
the Executive Committee will refer the matter to the Board of 
Trustees for action. 

It was also decided to defer until a later date, con- 
sideration of the agenda item on approval of Campus Center charges. 

Chairman Healey, as delegate to the Board of Higher 
Education, reported on recent developments with respect to a pro- 
posed amendment of Section 3 of Chapter 703. The effect of this 
proposed amendment is to reaffirm the authority of the Board of 
Trustees to request the University Building Authority to initiate 
projects after (a) soliciting the view of the Board of Higher Edu- 
cation and receiving notice that said Board has no objection or 
(b) reasserting its (the Trustees) request with full authority in 
event the Board of Higher Education objects; or (c) notification 
to the Building Authority that 60 days have elapsed since the Board 
of Higher Education has received from the Trustees notification of 
a request to the Building Authority, and that no reply to the 
Trustees has been received. 

Bond Counsel Broadhurst submitted a draft of this amend- 
ment, which was mailed to Chancellor Millard in advance of a meet- 
ing of the Board of Higher Education. Subsequently, Counsel draftee 
a second, preferred version of the amendment and sought to have it 
replace the first one submitted. However, a sub-committee of the 
Board of Higher Education had already approved the first amendment 
submitted and is now in the position of considering the replacement 
for this amendment, but no definite action has been taken. 

Trustee Healey read to the meeting a copy of Chancellor 
Millard's letter of transmittal of the second version to the Board 
of Higher Education sub-committee. This letter reflected position 
of the University's Counsel and contained his request to have this 
version replace his first draft of an amendment to Section 3 of 



Building 

Authority 

Eleventh 

Project 

Request 



Board of 
Higher 
Education - 

Proposed 
Amendment 
Section 3, 
Chapter 703 



2956 



COMMITTEE 



Master 
Plan 



Approvel 
Amendment 
Section 3 
Chapter 703 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chapter 703 originally approved by the sub-committee of the Board of 
Higher Education. The letter included the offer of Attorney 
Broadhurst to stand by in the event the Board of Higher Education 
sub-committee wished to have clarification. Counsel Broadhurst 
was not called upon. Trustee Healey's personal view was that the 
first draft of the amendment as approved by the Board of Higher 
Education sub-committee is an improvement on the previous structure 
of Section 3 of Chapter 703. However, Counsel Broadhurst, after 
discussion with counsels for SMT1 and Lowell Tech, feels approval 
of the second revision is desirable. Accordingly, Acting Chairman 
Healey recommended that the Executive Committee support Counsel 
Broadhurst' s proposal. 

There was general discussion and it was the consensus of 
the Executive Committee that the Board of Higher Education should 
not in any fashion limit the authority of the Board of Trustees to 
deal directly with the Executive Branch or Committees of the legis- 
lature on any pertinent matter. However, under statute, it was 
pointed out that the Board of Higher Education has the authority 
to approve the overall, long range development of higher education 
in the state. 

It was the consensus that a master plan for the Univer- 
sity should be presented to the Trustees without further delay. 
Dean Redfern stated it would be possible to have this for early con- 
sideration. Trustee Pumphret suggested the plan should show what 
is being considered for the Amherst campus, the Boston campus and 
possible long range developments in Worcester. The report should 
be concise and readable, regardless of how much documentation was 
appended as back-up material. Dean Redfern agreed to present a 
draft of the Master Plan at the next meeting of the committee, pro- 
viding no emergency matters divert the attention of the President 
and staff. 

There was further discussion and comment and upon motion 
made and seconded, it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : To approve the version dated August 25, 
1967 of an amendment of Section 3 of 
Chapter 703 as prepared by Bond Counsel 
Broadhurst, copy attached herewith 
(Document T68-008) . 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m 





J. McCartney 
Board of Trust 



F 



s 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
September 14, 1967, 11:30 a.m., Sheraton Boston Hotel 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Pumphret, President 
Lederle; Trustees Crowley, 
Frechette, Lambson; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney 



Provost Tippo, Dean Redfern, 
Professor Havard, Miss Coulter 
and Messrs. John Wood and Ted 
Ladd of Standish, Ayer & Wood, 
Inc. 



Chairman Pumphret opened the meeting by introducing 
Messrs. Wood and Ladd of the firm of Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 
investment counsel, who proceeded to review the Endowment Fund 
Portfolio. They noted the fund was distributed as follows: 



(Book Value) (Market Value) 



$64,000 




$64,000 


5.7% 


422,701 




380,000 


33.6 


21,000 




21,000 


1.9 


7,200 




7,000 


0.6 


N.A. 




659,681 


58.2 




$1 


,131,881 


100 . 07, 



Uninvested Cash 
Marketable Bonds 
Fraternity Loans 
Preferred Stocks 
Common Stocks 



They presented recommendations for investment of the 
$64,000 of uninvested cash and other changes which were discussed 
by the committee. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 



295? 



VOTED : 



To 


buy: 


25 


,000 1 


25 


,000 


50 


,000 


To 


switch 



issue 



5.20 



Fed Nat'l Mtge.P.C 

1/19/77 
Boston Edison 1st 6-1/8 

6/1/97-72 



price 
96 3/4 



market 
$24,187 



102 1/2 25,625 
Total $49,812 



up to $75,000 par value of U.S. Treasuries 
into comparable maturity Federal Agencies at a 
minimum yield to maturity advantage of 50 basis points 
at a time to be recommended by Standish, Ayer and 
Wood, Inc. 



J 



To sell : issue 

236 

100 



price 



market 



Fairfield County Trust(L40) 33 
Stamford Water (1.80) 



To buy : 
100 
100 
200 



Armco Steel (3.00) 
Travelers Corp. (0.64) 
Minn. Mining (1.30) 



) 33 


7,788 


46 


4,600 


55 


5,500 


29 


2,900 


86 


17,200 



Endowment 
Fund 

Portfolio 
Review 



Investment 



2958 



COMMITTEE 



Ocean Spray- 
Cranberry 
Stock 



Faculty 

Club 

Addition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustees hold 47 shares of common stock and 62 shares 
of preferred stock in Ocean Spray Cranberry of which the initial 
stock was given to the University many years ago, in order to per- 
mit the University to market its surplus cranberries from the Cran- 
berry Experiment Station through this cooperative. On motion made 
and seconded, T^t was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees . 
VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to establish 
a separate trust fund for the purpose of 
accounting for the stock of Ocean Spray 
Cranberry. 

Professor Havard, President of the Faculty Club, pre- 
sented a Fund Drive brochure that the Faculty Club is circulating, 
to raise funds to pay for expansion and improved facilities for the 
Club. An architect has prepared sketches for the addition. It was 
noted that the Trustee minutes of January 31, 1967 record the 
Trustees' approval of the plan to move the Homestead to the site 
north of Stockbridge House and permit the Faculty Club to join the 
two historical buildings together with an addition as described in 
the brochure. The architect's current estimate of the cost of the 
project is: 



Construction (architects letters of 9/12/67) 

Architects fees 

Kitchen equipment 

Furnishings 

Contingency 

Total Cost 



$129,000. 

15,000. 

25,000. 

25,000. 

6,000. 

$200,000. 



} 



The Faculty Club now needs $15,000 so that the architects 

may continue the plans and prepare sketches for the fund drive. 

After discussion, it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

VOTED : To agree in principle that funds should 
be made available for the project and 
that a recommendation would be made to 
the Board of Trustees after consultation 
with legal counsel. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 noon. 




Robert 
Secretary 




cCartney 
the Universi 



) 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
September 25, 1967, 12:30 p.m., Room 414, Statler Hilton Hotel, Bostor 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Acting Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Brown, Haigis, 
Lyons, McNamara, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, 
Dean Redfern, Business Manager 
Grady, Dr. Cope, Office of Insti- 
tutional Studies; Miss Coulter. 



Acting Chairman Healey convened the meeting. 

President Lederle outlined the basic reasons for the 
meeting, including review of the budget, prior to consideration 
by the full Board of Trustees on October 21; also, the necessity 
to obtain approval of the Executive Committee so that the ad- 
ministration can submit it to the State House by the end of 
September. 

The need for improved legislative liaison also was 
described as a pressing problem. There is a need for day to day 
contact and coverage of pertinent legislative matters. The Presi- 
dent outlined various proposals that had been suggested. The 
Executive Committee's consensus was that the President take appro- 
priate steps in the light of the discussion. 

The President continued that the next item for con- 
sideration would be the non-professional employees manual. He 
asked Treasurer Johnson to explain the problems relatingto this 
document to the Executive Committee. 

Treasurer Johnson said the administration has been under 
pressure by the Massachusetts State Employees Association to get 
the University's rules and regulations into print. The draft 
manual prepared by the University Personnel Office and supplied 
for committee review is mainly a compilation of existing rules, 
regulations and procedures, calculated to guarantee equitable 
treatment to non-professional employees. Business Manager Grady 
then described for the committee the policy issues which are 
covered in the manual. 

1. The over-all welfare of the University will 
be considered in all personnel practices and 
policies. 



2959 



Legislative 
Liaison 



Non- 
Professional 
Employees 
Manual 



2960 



COMMITTEE 



10. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Policies and procedures relating to non- 
professional employment will be uniform 
and apply to all non-professional positions 
and employees, and will be administered by 
a central personnel office. 

It is the policy of the University to 
guarantee equal employment opportunities 
all qualified applicants will receive con- 
sideration for employment without regard 
to age, race, creed, color, national origin, 
or sex. 

It is the policy of the University not to 
consider applicants during the time when 
they occupy or are candidates for full-time 
political office. 

It is the policy of the University to 
process employment applicants throughout 
the year. Testing and appointing is con- 
tinual and open. 

It is the policy of the University to give 
full publicity to job openings and to pro- 
vide ample time and opportunity for pro- 
spective employees to apply. 

It is the policy of the University not to 
employ persons under the immediate authority 
of close relatives. 

The personnel policies and procedures of 
the University are directed toward obtain- 
ing the best qualified person for every 
position. All applicants are interviewed 
and objective criteria are used in the se- 
lection of employees, including appropriate 
tests. 

It is the policy of the University to 
encourage promotions and transfers when 
they are to the mutual advantage of the 
employee and the University. Vacancies 
are filled by promotion from within the 
University staff unless there is sufficient 
reason for an exception to this rule. 

It is the policy of the University that 
whenever two or more applicants for a posi- 
tion are considered approximately equal in 
all other factors, seniority within the 
University will determine which applicant 
shall be appointed. 



2961 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



11. All employees must be physically able 
to perform the duties and responsibili- 
ties of the position to which they are 
appointed, and must satisfy the pro- 
visions of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth relating to tuberculin 
tests. Handicapped persons may be 
employed in positions for which they 
qualify. 

12. All employees are required to take the 
"Oath of Allegiance" required by the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth. 

13. The selection of an applicant by the 
appointing authority of a department 
is a recommendation subject to the 
approval of the President. 

14. When there are more than five bona- fide 
on-campus applicants for each vacancy 
in non-professional positions above 
Grade 7, the selection procedures may 
include the recommendations of Advisory 
Boards on Non-Professional Appointments; 
the membership of such Advisory Boards 
will include non-professional employees. 

15. For the first six months all appointments 
are probationary. During this probationary 
period, an employee may be terminated at 
any time, and such action cannot be 
questioned or appealed by the employee. 

No member of the non-professional staff 
shall, after having actually performed 
the duties of any office or position at 
the University of Massachusetts for a 
period of six months, be thereafter dis- 
charged, removed, suspended, laid off or 
lowered in rank or compensation from the 
latest office or employment held by him 
at the University except for just cause 
and for reasons specifically given him in 
writing, as long as funds are available 
to pay his salary. 

16. No University employee in a probationary 
status shall be eligible for appointments 
to a position unless all applicants are 
in a similar status or are non-University 
employees. 



2962 



COMMITTEE 



Budget 

Request 

1969 



Master 
Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



17. The University recognizes the value of 
employee organizations, and in 
accordance with the rules and statutes 
of the Commonwealth, cooperates with 
such organizations in the common goal 
of promoting the best interests of the 
employees and the best interests of the 
University. 

It was agreed that the policies covered in the manual 
apply only to the Amherst campus. 

Acting Chairman Healey duly noted that the Board of 
Trustees, through the Executive Committee, has been advised of the 
President's intention to promulgate the rules and regulations of 
the University which apply to non-professional personnel practices 
and procedures. 

President Lederle introduced the next agenda item, the 
1969 Operating Budget Request. He asked for comments and 
suggestions on the content and form of presentation so as to insure 
the most effective impact of the document. After thorough 
discussion of the general editorial approach, it was agreed that 
certain editorial changes would be made to strengthen the document 
before it is submitted to the Governor. 

The Treasurer commented on the Supplemental Budget request 
He expressed optimism that certain budget cuts for vitally needed 
items at the University will be replaced in the supplemental budget. 
These include additional positions and library funds for both 
Amherst and Boston. 

Acting Chairman Healey then called for further comment on 
the figures involved in the report. There being none, he stated 
the Operational Budget Request for 1969 was ready to be referred to 
the Governor with copy to the Board of Higher Education. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of the Operations Budget 
Request for the Fiscal Year 1969, as 
detailed in document T68-011, which 
document is herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes. 

President Lederle then asked Dean Redfern to discuss the 
Master Plan, copies of which had been supplied to the committee in 
advance of the meeting. 



' 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Dean said this plan should be visualized in three 
sections (1) enrollment (2) academic program (3) capital develop- 
ment and operational requirements. Each section would grow out of 
approvals of the prior section. Sectionalization will permit de- 
tachment of each portion of the report for selective distribution. 
The Dean noted that the present draft has incorporated 
suggestions made at a prior meeting. We now indicate "plateau 
levels" for the University at Amherst and at Boston. The impact 
of transfer students on projected future enrollment is covered. 

Acting Chairman Healey expressed approval of the draft. 
He stressed the importance of keeping these documents confidential 
and within the committee until the final report is completed and 
officially released. 

There was discussion relative to the 257» enrollment 
figure in the graduate area. President Lederle stated the Univer- 
sity has a mandate to engage in graduate work. It is probable 
that progress is not being made as fast as it should be at the 
graduate level. 

The role of the community colleges and the role of the 
University in the total structure of higher education was 
discussed. Trustee Troy said the firmness and the completeness of 
the University commitment to the community colleges is good, but 
we should try to get as many good students as we can. We limit 
the number of incoming freshmen by this commitment to transfers 
from other institutions and we must be sure that in the process we 
are not denying superior students opportunity to enter as freshmen 

President Lederle assured the meeting that he has exerted 
efforts to encourage other institutions to assume more of the 
burden of community college transfers to allow the University 
greater flexibility. 

Dean Redfern noted that the enrollment figures as shown 
for Boston and Worcester were contingent on the availability of 
adequate facilities at a permanent site. 

Acting Chairman Healey re-emphasized that the Master Plan 
should be kept within the Executive Committee for the present. 
When completely and finally formulated, it can be submitted for 
consideration by the full Board of Trustees. It should then be 
presented to the Board of Higher Education. Dean Redfern encourage^ 
the committee to submit suggestions and said he would now proceed 
with the next block. 

Due to the importance of the item on Honorary Degrees, 
the Chairman suggested that this matter be postponed until the 
Secretary could arrange a convenient date for committee discussion 
of this item at greater length, hopefully in advance of the 
Trustee meeting of October 21. The President noted that the final 
vote on honorary degrees should be at the November meeting of the 
Board. 



2963 



COMMITTEE 



Realignments 
between 
University & 
Alumni 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President asked Secretary McCartney to outline 
briefly for the committee the key points in a draft proposal for 
certain realignments in relations between the University and the 
Associate Alumni. 

Trustee Troy said six members of the Board are graduates 
of the University. He suggested formation of a committee, with 
the Secretary, to explore the possibilities contained in this pro- 
posal. President Lederle said we must think in terms of total 
university development. 

Chairman Healey said the students and graduates of the 
University are getting a bargain in education and owe more to the 
University than graduates, for example, of Harvard or Yale. In this 
context, they should be willing to contribute generously. 

It was left that Trustee Troy and Secretary McCartney 
would confer and arrange follow up. 

The President advised that the Commencement speaker had 
been secured. Further discussion on Honorary Degrees will be left 
until the Secretary has arranged another meeting of the Executive 
Committee at a mutually convenient time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:20 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 





McCartney 
rd of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



2965 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



October 3, 1967, 11:00 a.m 

PRESENT 



Whitmore Building, Amherst 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Crowley, Emerson; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Gagnon, Director of Physical Plant 
Hugill, UM/B Planning Director 
Francis O'Brien; Messrs. Sasaki, 
Galehouse and Alexander of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc; 
Dean Field, Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting and asked consul- 
tants from the staff of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. to 
review for the committee, the background of the search for a site 
for the University at Boston. 

Mr. Kay Alexander, referring to an area map, and a wall 
chart, recalled the sequence of previous evaluations of sites. 
Mr. Alexander reviewed the three sites suggested by the BRA: 
Columbia Point, Highland Park and East Boston. He said, after 
working with the BRA to the point of a tentative agreement, the 
matter then deterioriated. Early in August last year a site 
comparison of three locations was requested and prepared: 
Wollaston, Columbia Point and Highland Park, as well as a typical 
Route 128 site. The issues which arose from these comparisons 
brought forth Trustee indication that a location as close as 
possible to the urban core was desirable. 

Mr. Alexander continued - in February, 1967, seven more 
sites were evaluated and a five-item site criteria was established, 
This criteria was illustrated on the large wall chart (see 
attached) . 

Emphasis was placed on the relation of the campus to 
Boston's resources and the site size became a minimum for 15,000 
full-time students. The public press rejected the University's 
locational objectives as then indicated, he said. Mr. Alexander 
outlined on the Boston area map the sites considered or under 
consideration, labeling them 

a. core area 

b. core fringe 

c. outside core area 

and related them to the wall chart showing the major assessments 
or the three types of areas. 



UM at Boston 
Site 



2966 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Alexander then showed slides of areas under discussion 
so that the full import of surroundings, transportation facilities, 
expansion possibilities and other salient factors were evident. 
Graphic discussion followed on: 



(1) Wollaston Golf Course 

(2) Watertown Arsenal 

(3) Allston interchange area 

(4) Naval Annex 

(5) Columbia Point 



(6) Highland Park area 

(7) Channel site 

(8) Copley turnpike air 

rights site 

(9) Park Square 



(10) Statler Hilton 

(11) Governor Shirley site (no photo.) 

Mr. Sasaki said the consultants can describe the physical 
aspects of the sites, note environment, size and possible acquisi- 
tion cost and thinking in terms of availability, can look at exist- 
ing uses that would have to be moved or redeveloped. He suggested 
that Mr. Francis O'Brien of the UM/Boston Planning staff would be 
able to contribute concrete factual information as to practical 
availability. Mr. O'Brien then addressed the committee. He briefly 
reviewed the history of his investigation starting in February 1967 
of the seven sites then under active consideration. In terms of the 
practical aspects and urgency of securing a site, with a minimum of 
delay, Mr. O'Brien concluded, Columbia Point is the only 
immediately available site; viewed in terms of desirability and 
accessibility, as demonstrated by the application of the criteria 
in the wall chart, he held the Copley turnpike (air rights) site 
was unequaled and was in fact the only suitable site and encouraged 
the committee to pursue this matter further. He was extremely 
optimistic that persistent and knowledgeable efforts could bring 
about the desired result - acquisition of this area. 

Chancellor Ryan underlined the factor that recommendation 
of a site to the Legislature must be made by January, thus the 
Trustees must resolve the selection by December. The Chancellor 
felt the only in-city site which is big enough and is without known 
opposition and, in fact, has neighborhood support, is the Governor 
Shirley site. It was noted that this 45-acre site would involve 
displacing approximately 375 people and 150 buildings would have to 
be moved. 

There was general discussion in which Chairman Haigis 
stated the Board was justified in the philosophy that there is a 
mandate to be an urban university, a part of an urban area and urban 
society. The President commented, however, in view of the exhaustive 
search for an inner city or core location, that it is a sad 
commentary that no one has come forward positively and wanted the 
University there. President Lederle said he shared the view of the 
desirability of a location in the center of the city, but we should 
now consider the possibilities of other locations with the ad- 
vantages of proximity to rapid transit and other features. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



296' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was the considered opinion that rather than stay with 
only the core site, two or three outside sites should be included 
as top possibilities, in which case the acreage would be increased 
geometrically (to include consideration of a green campus, etc.). 
In line with this, it was agreed the Watertown Arsenal should be 
considered. Chairman Haigis issued a mandate to Chancellor Ryan 
to clarify the availability of this site. 

Treasurer Johnson said the practical thing to do is to 
list those sites which are available (rather than try to find ideal 
sites that are not available) and evaluate them to see which of 
them is the best choice. Mr. Sasaki said in view of the feeling 
that availability and accessibility are important, perhaps 
Metropolitan State Hospital land in "<7altham should also be added 
to the list for consideration. 

The meeting moved to luncheon during which there was an 
open discussion on the naming of new buildings. 

After luncheon the committee toured the Project 8 dormi- 
tories and the Whitmore Administration Building. 

The meeting reconvened. 

Treasurer Johnson described a proposed land acquisition 
in Amherst at 63 Clark Street consisting of a house and one acre 
of land. The University holds an option for $26,500 from the owner 
and recommends the acquisition. Two appraisals have been made 
which determine this value. On motion made and seconded, it was 
then 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 590, Acts of 

1966, Item 8067-69 and other Acts 
authorizing the Trustees of the University 
to acquire land, or land with buildings 
thereon, by purchase or by eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, for 
the further development of the University; 
independent appraisals of the value of the 
land and buildings; if any, having been 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers 
and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
that the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, the property 
of H. Ruth Mclntire (supposed owner) , consist- 
ing of 43,359 sq. ft. more or less, located 
in Amherst, Mass., at 63 Clark Street said 
parcel being that described as Parcels 2 and 
3, Page 11B of the Amherst Town Atlas (1966); 
and that the purchase price for said property 
be Twenty Six Thousand Five Hundred ($26,500) 
dollars. 



Mclntire 
Property 



2968 



COMMITTEE 



Designers 
Master Plan 
UM/ Bos ton 



Master Plan 
Scope 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reported the property expected to be 
acquired in Amherst and Worcester through eminent domain proceed- 
ings, and approved by previous action of the Board, had not yet 
been completed, due to unavoidable delay in routine by counsel. 
It is expected this work will be accelerated and completed soon. 

Provost Tippo advised there had been threat of picketing 
inside one of the buildings on campus. The legality of this was 
questioned and Trustee Emerson suggested securing the opinion of 
the Attorney General on this matter and it was agreed to do so. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that the designers for the 
master plan for the Boston campus had been appointed; Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates, Inc. and Pietro Belluschi, working together as 
associates. The Treasurer said the University administration had 
two meetings with them to work out a program arrangement for the 
scope of the master plan in which the Chairman of the Bureau of 
Building Construction also participated. 

Treasurer Johnson supplied to the committee copies of a 
working draft (Document T68-012) which outlined the Scope of Service 
indicating the major studies required to prepare a long-range 
Master Plan, along with items important to explain the University's 
proposal. The Treasurer said the designers will report to 
Chancellor Ryan for direction as the project progresses. Mr. Sasaki 
then asked Mr. Kay Alexander to give the highlights of the program. 

Mr. Alexander explained the long-range Master Plan will 
be a comprehensive guide to the development of the permanent campus 
for the Boston Branch of the University of Massachusetts. He said 
the plan will give positive direction and guidance to campus de- 
velopment and will be able to adjust to changes in academic 
organization, building program and construction staging. 

Mr. Alexander said the plan will establish functional and 
design objectives for the campus development through a series of 
drawings illustrating general site layout, major use and circulation 
building bulk and massing, open space organization, general archi- 
tectural character and construction staging. General estimates of 
construction cost also will be prepared for the University's capital 
budgetary purposes. 

A series of work phases have been established, Mr. 
Alexander stated, which include: 

I. Site Evaluation 

II. Review and Evaluate University Building Program 

III. Compile Site Data 

IV. Initial Master Plan Studies 

V. Development Initial Studies 

VI. Finalize Master Plan Studies 

VII. Documentation 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He stressed that phase III (Compile Site Data) cannot be completed 
until the site for the Boston campus has been selected, as it will 
include base survey map, soil borings, traffic and transit data, 
etc. Although a work model will be prepared and used during the 
planning, a display model will also be prepared. The designers 
plan to meet with the BBC on work phases IV and V. The University 
then would be able to complete the architect's contract for the 
first phase of construction. Mr. Sasaki commented that the site 
evaluation process could consume the total budget unless this 
period is limited. 

Treasurer Johnson said the site selection process will 
continue outside the scope of this program of site evaluation and 
that the plans will return to the committee and the Board, at the 
time of review by the BBC, so that any additions or changes can 
still be made. 

In summary, Chairman Haigis said that the committee is 
not yet ready to go to the Governor or the Legislative leadership 
with a site, in fact the situation has changed and the following 
possibilities are under consideration: 

(1) can abandon the idea of a core location; 
or consider the three previously listed: 

a. Governor Shirley 

b. Columbia Point 

c. Copley Turnpike 

(2) can go outside the core 

(3) can change the philosophy (split the units - 
or go to suburbs) 

After wide discussion, it was considered that Chancellor Ryan had 
a mandate from the committee to work with the consultants and 
Mr. O'Brien to compile a list, with criteria to evaluate non-core 
sites; against which the inner-city sites could also be evaluated. 

The meeting then moved to consideration of dormitory 
sites in Amherst. 

The Treasurer said the Building Authority had been re- 
quested by the Trustees to provide housing for 1400 students by 
1970. Delay has been occasioned by lack of appropriate legislation 
which would lift the ceiling on the Building Authority borrowing. 
The Treasurer exhibited a plan of the campus as it is today and 
explained that the original intent was to split the proposed dormi 
tories so that 800 students would be served meals in the North 
Dining Commons and 600 in the South Dining Commons; it is now 
planned to serve all the students in the North Dining Commons. 
The Treasurer said this might prove crowded, but it was felt de- 
sirable to acquire more experience in the operation of the South- 
west before programming another Dining Hall. 



2969 



2970 



Dormitories 



COMMITTEE 



Traffic 

and 

Parking 



Faculty 
Club 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In the following discussion, the Dean of Students 
suggested the future possibility of requiring all resident students 
to eat within the dining halls on at least a five-day basis; con- 
sideration was also extended to a seven-day basis as is followed in 
many other universities. The Treasurer pointed out that in this 
event another dining hall would be a necessity by 1970. The Dean 
stated, in the meantime, the policy of exempting only senior stu- 
dents (except in Southwest dormitories) would be continued. 

Treasurer Johnson submitted alternate site proposals for 
the new dormitories as recommended by the Master Plan consultants: 

(a) fill in north women's court area 

(b) wooded area east of Women s ' Physical Education 

Building 

(c) other sites that split the group 

Mr. Sasaki felt that the north women's dormitory area 
should be studied to determine if it is not indeed feasible. 



After thorough discussion, motion was made and seconded, 



and it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
request the Building Authority architect 
to develop study plans to house 1400 
students at the site shown as plan A on 
file in the Office of the Treasurer - 
being the area inside the north women's 
dormitory area and to report back whether 
the site is architectually feasible. 



The representatives of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
then left the meeting. 

Chairman Haigis informed the committee of a petition from 
local homeowners he had received in his capacity as Trustee, as a 
result of the traffic conditions incurred by the campus construction 
and re-routing program. Mr. Hugill, Director of Physical Plant, 
outlined the steps that had been taken to alleviate this situation, 
including conferences with the Town Manager. As a result of this, 
the Town Manager is to form committees to work with University 
committees and Mr. Lambert of the Planning-Engineering Department. 
The keynote to the whole situation is acquisition of a small parcel 
of property, as yet unattainable, which blocks construction of a 
planned new road. The Treasurer assured Chairman Haigis that every 
effort will be made to expedite satisfactory solutions. 

Chairman Haigis presented, for approval, preliminary plans 
for the Faculty Club. After examination and discussion, motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the preliminary plans for the Faculty Club. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman submitted for consideration, approval of 
the Project 8 dormitories, through which the committee had toured 
following luncheon. Motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

acceptance of Project 8 dormitories as com- 
pleted in accordance with plans and speci- 
fications, subject to the completion of items 
on a list on file with the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

The Chairman then submitted for approval, the Whitmore 
Administration Building which had been inspected by the committee 
earlier in the day. Motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the Whitmore Administration 
Building as completed in accordance with 
plans and specifications, subject to the 
completion of items on a list on file with 
the Office of the Treasurer. 

After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the Agricultural Engineering 
Building as completed in accordance with 
plans and specifications, subject to the 
completion of items on a list on file with 
the Office of the Treasurer. 

Mr. Hugill described the steps taken to improve road 
lighting on campus as well as the continuous study on the parking 
situation. On motion thereupon made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the completed Road Project 
#U-64-l, Contract No. 3, Phase I, Cross 
Campus Boulevard (improvement to roads, 
sidewalks and parking areas) . 

The preliminary plans for the new boiler plant were pre- 
sented by Mr. Hugill. After consideration, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of preliminary plans for the 
new boiler plant expansion to the power 
house - Project U 63-7. 

Preliminary plans for the parking garage were supplied by 
Mr. Hugill. After examination and discussion, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 



2971 



Inspection and 
Acceptance 
Dormitory 
Project 8 



Whitmore 

Administration 

Building 



Agricultural 

Engineering 

Building 



Road 
Project 



Power 
Plant - 
boiler 



2972 



Parking 
Garage 



COMMITTEE 



Central 
Storage 
Building 

Naming of 
Buildings 
and Streets 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

acceptance of the preliminary plans for 
the parking garage as submitted by the 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority. 

Due to the nature and usage of the Central Storage Build- 
ing, it was the consensus that it should be named the Physical 
Plant Building. Motion was thereupon made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the name of the Central Storage 
Building be THE PHYSICAL PLANT BUILDING. 

Discussion was held on the naming of new buildings and it 
was the unanimous opinion that one of the major campus buildings 
should be named in honor of the late Governor Herter. At an appro- 
priate time recommendation will be made to the Board of Trustees. 
In the meantime, the Treasurer will compile a list of all buildings 
and streets as yet unnamed for consideration by the committee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:20 p.m. 



ffl 





! 



McCartney 
Board of Truf 



ees 



COMMITTEE 



2973 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
October 9, 1967, 10:00 a.m., Whitmore Building, Amherst, Mass, 



PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, Provost Tippo 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Dean of Students Field, Associate 
Dean of Students Noffsinger, In- 
tern Thompson, Miss Coulter, Miss 
Frances K. Boronski, Vice President 
Student Senate; Mr. Robert J. 
LaTremouille, Committee on Student 
Life; Mr. Stephen P. Nault, Student 
Senate Committee on Men's Affairs; 
Miss Elinor T. Needle, Chairman of 
Women's Affairs; Mr. James J. Burke, 
Area Coordinator-Central Area; Dr. 
George B. Goddard, Faculty Senate 
Committee Student Affairs; Dr. John 
A. Hunt, Committee on Student Life; 
Dr. Donald N. Maynard, Chairman, 
Faculty Senate Committee on Student 
Affairs. 

Chairman Lyons convened the meeting at 10:00 a.m. stat- 
ing the occasion of the meeting was a progress report and 
discussion of the result of the changes in residence hall regula- 
tions and role definitions instituted at the University a year 
ago; these included curfew regulations and redefinitions of the 
functions of residence hall counselors and heads of residence. 

The Dean of Students introduced the representatives of 
the Committee on Student Life and Faculty Senate Committee on Stu- 
dent Affairs and initiated discussion of the two major subjects 
proposed for discussion: 

(a) codification contained in the student hand- 
book (Document T68-013) 

(b) questionnaire data, following year of opera- 
tion in residence halls. 

Dean Field noted the student handbook was supplied to 
the committee for information only and would be submitted to the 
Board of Trustees for consideration and potential action after a 
one year experience. 

The Dean expressed the hope that the meeting would pro- 
vide opportunity for the individuals present who represented two 
key committees on campus to discuss freely the entire situation 
with the Trustee Committee on Student Activities. 



2974 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Lyons referred to the three-page summary supplied 
to the committee, entitled "Major Findings and Implications of the 
1967* Student Life Survey, University of Massachusetts" (Document 
T68-014) . He commented that in general the reaction to the changes, 
including the modified curfew regulations (limiting the curfew to 
freshman women) seemed quite favorable, as reflected in this docu- 
ment. 

Mr. LaTremouille, representative of the Committee on Stu- 
dent Life and the Student Senate Committee on Men's Affairs, said 
the general attitude on the "no curfew system" was that it is 
merely a return to normalcy; that in fact a curfew was an abnormal 
situation to most students in their non-academic environment. He 
said as a result of this change the social climate is much more 
healthy without the stress of the regulation hanging overhead. 
Miss Needle, Chairman of Women's Affairs and a member of the 
Committee on Student Life concurred, adding there is now strong 
student support for the elimination of curfew after the first 
semester, stating there is no reason after one semester for this 
distinction between Freshmen and Upperclassmen in this respect. 

Chairman Lyons pointed out that one of the factors con- 
sidered in establishment of the curfew was the benefit to the new 
student, in helping to get adjusted to University life and to adopt 
sound study habits. Miss Needle agreed, but felt this effect had 
been established after the first semester and that the students' 
familiarity with the campus had developed to a point of maturity 
which eliminated the need for sustained curfew rules. 

Mr. Burke, Area Coordinator-Central Area and Chairman of 
the Committee on Student Life, felt the only value in curfew was for 
the initial stages of Freshmen, but that it did not improve study 
habits. He stated in fact the curfew was more of a social factor 
and had no relation to studies. 

Chairman Lyons then opened discussion on the results of 
the survey bearing on moral climate, drugs and alcohol. He noted 
the survey indicated more than 607o of the student body reported they 
consumed alcoholic beverages in their own home with their parents' 
knowledge and consent. Alcohol is not permitted in dormitories at 
the University. A small percent of students indicated experience 
with the use of marijuana and a still smaller percent had used LSD. 
The survey showed no major change in the moral climate on campus; 
707o of the students felt it had not changed and the balance were 
divided between thinking it had improved or had worsened, with more 
women feeling the climate had deteriorated. 

As a result of the changes instituted last year, the role 
of residence hall counselors and heads of residence changed. Miss 
Boronski, Faculty Senate Committee on Student Affairs and Vice 
President of the Student Senate and a member of the Student Executive 
Council considered this period one of transition and straightening 
out. In general, more responsibility for student behavior was 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

transferred to the student residents and counselors and heads of 
residence became more service oriented and less concerned with ad- 
ministrative and disciplinary matters. Miss Boronski felt, and 
the group in general agreed, that progress is being made. 

Associate Dean of Students, Dr. Noff singer, described a 
new program designed to be helpful to the counselors in assuming 
the new role. He said 12 to 13 weekly training sessions, with a 
qualified instructor, includes discussion on the practical problems 
of administration. 

Participation in self-government in the residence halls, 
as well as in academic, cultural and social events has increased 
with greater advance in participation level in the Orchard Hill 
and Southwest areas than in the traditional living areas, Miss 
Boronski said. She expressed optimism and confidence that im- 
provement would continue in all areas as the period of transition 
progressed. 

Discussion of study conditions revealed a unanimous 
opinion that serious consideration should be given to improvement 
in every area. Study conditions in the living units were 
described as less than ideal. The general view was that responsi- 
bility for enforcement of quiet hours in dormitories or residences 
rested with the students and so far had resulted in a lack of ade- 
quate enforcement. The solution has been study in the library, 
the Student Union, branch library areas. Dean Field pointed out 
that with 10,000 students in dormitories, the library can seat 
only a small amount of this number at one time, hence if the resi- 
dence halls cannot be made places to study, there is no place to 
go. Dr. Noff singer said the student committees must step forward 
and accept responsibility and work for a solution. 

General discussion was held on study habits and needs 
and included consideration of extended hours at the library. It 
was noted, however, that the library is open until midnight and 
the Student Union is available for study until 11:00 p.m. and on 
occasion is available even later. The Provost said that although 
consideration will be given to converting the former Butterfield 
dining hall to a study area, it cannot, due to lack of funds, be 
established as a branch library at the present time. The Provost 
noted that the University of Vermont has one small study room 
which remains open 24 hours a day, in the library, but that ideally 
each residence should have its own library though this is not part 
of current University plan. He stressed that every effort will 
continue to be made to insure improved study facilities and condi- 
tions . 

An extension of the open house privilege, beyond the 
once a month now generally accepted, is considered desirable by 
the students, Miss Needle said. Discussion held on this revealed 
also that students feel some method of controlling uninvited per- 
sons (students) is needed. It was acknowledged the responsibility 



297 r 



2976 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for student behavior now was generally that of the student resi- 
dents, but the natural reluctance to enforce regulation because of 
the unpopular effect made enforcement lax. 

The manner of assessment for damage caused to the Uni- 
versity property by students was thoroughly discussed. The 
principle was endorsed. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:35 a.m. 



P 




Robert 
Secreta 




McCartney 
Board of Trustees 



II 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
October 16, 1967, 9:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Acting Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Emerson, Haigis, 
Lyons, Pumphret, Troy. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, 
Miss Coulter. 



In the absence of the Chairman, Vice Chairman Healey con- 
vened the meeting. 

The meeting proceeded immediately to consideration of 
the listing of Proposed Honorary Degree Candidates, assembled in 
accord with established formula, and supplied to the committee in 
advance of the meeting. 

The President reviewed the procedure, stating that after 
screening of the full list by the Executive Committee, the re- 
sultant recommendations are submitted to the full Board of Trustees 
who consider the nominees and vote at the "next following regular 
meeting of the Board". 

After extensive consideration and discussion, accord was 
reached and motion was made to submit a list of eleven names to 
the Board, with the recommendation that five of these, as indi- 
cated, receive immediate consideration in order to allow early 
contact. 

Motion was thereupon made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees con- 
sideration of the listing of Honorary De- 
gree Candidates (Document T68-019) on file 
in the Secretary's Office; and approval of 
those indicated specifically thereon by 
asterisk, to permit early contact. 

Trustee Pumphret introduced discussion of a letter from 
the Town of Amherst Fire Chief to President Lederle. The Presi- 
dent assured the committee that Treasurer Johnson reports a great 
deal of progress, and this will be delineated in the letter of 
response. One of the basic problems has been ready access to campu 
areas, due to traffic. This has been solved by barring traffic in 
certain streets through installing raised curbings, which allow 
trucks with their high carriages to pass, while normal vehicular 
traffic remains obstructed. The President described other 



297? 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Fire 
Protection 



2978 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



effective measures instituted and future plans. He said the State 
Fire Marshal is preparing a report which is expected soon. In the 
meantime, basically, compared to the rest of the state, the 
University's protection is good, though there doubtless are areas 
in which improvement could be made. 

Trustee Pumphret emphasized that the buildings meet all 
of the standards of the Commonwealth. 

Vice Chairman Healey stated the committee's keen interest 
in the official report of the Commonwealth's Fire Marshal. He said 
that in the event of divergent opinions, the State Agency review 
should clarify matters. >He stressed the Trustees' continuing in- 
terest to insure that everything is being done that should be done 
in the area of providing appropriate fire protection on the campus. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:55 a.m. 



1 





J. McCartney 
ary, Board of 



ustees 



I! 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October 16, 1967, 1:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Maginnis, 
Plimpton, Rowland, Greenblatt. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter, Dean Gagnon, Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting and asked President 
Lederle to describe the proposal for Transcript Seals (Document 
T68-020) . The President said this request for permission to 
supply transcript seals to the Graduate School Office, Stockbridge 
School and the Registrar's Office is to facilitate the normal 
business of these offices in preparing transcripts. Under current 
practice, all offices use the University seal held in the Office 
of the Secretary, which necessitates a great deal of time spent 
and inconvenience transporting the records back and forth to the 
aforementioned offices. This situation has become more acute by 
the move of the central administration to the Whitmore Building. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

approval be granted for an official transcript 
seal . 

Provost Tippo introduced two proposed amendments to the 
Constitution of the Amherst Faculty Senate. The first amendment 
has the effect of including professional librarians among the 
academic group, which most universities do, he said. It will pro- 
vide representation of professional librarians in the Faculty 
Senate. The second amendment is designed to provide temporary 
replacements to committees that must function during the summer. 
(Document T68-021) 



2979 



After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it 



was then 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the two proposed amendments to the Constitu- 
tion of the Faculty Senate as detailed in 
Document T68-021. 

Provost Tippo reviewed the College of Agriculture prograrr 
for the Center for International Agricultural Studies, as 
originally presented at the June meeting of the Trustees, and 
approved in principle by the committee. He suggested that it 
would now be desirable to have formal approval of the Center by 
the Board. The Provost said it is expected that Federal or founda 
tion funds will finance the program and hence the use of State 



Transcript 
Seal 



Amendments 

Amherst 

Faculty 

Senate 

Constitution 



Center for 
International 
Agricultural 
Studies 



2980 



COMMITTEE 



Coordinator 

Foreign 

Program 



Academic 

Organization 

Program 

UM at Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Funds is not contemplated. He further stated only approval of the 
Center is now requested; any academic or other programs will be 
brought to the Trustees for approval subsequently. 



There was discussion. Motion was made, seconded, and it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the establishment of "A Center for Inter- 
national Agricultural Studies" in the College 
of Agriculture as discussed in the proposal 
which was presented to the Trustees on June 30, 
1967. This action does not commit the Trustees 
or the University Administration to provide 
financial support for the operation of the 
Center, nor does it constitute approval of a 
bachelor or graduate degree program in this 
field. 

Anent the foreign programs, President Lederle advised 
that a recently added staff member (Mrs. North Burn) will have the 
primary function of studying the established programs at the Uni- 
versity, with a view to coordinating the foreign programs, and lend- 
ing special consideration to improve conditions for the foreign 
students now on campus. The President said one project planned 
will be to see if there is some better way for the University to 
organize and improve current programs. He briefly sketched Dr. 
Burn's experience and background, which include a doctorate in 
International Studies and work with the Asia Foundation in San 
Francisco. 

Chairman Troy then asked Chancellor Ryan to present the 
Academic Organization Proposal for the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston (Document T68-022) . The Chancellor stated this proposal 
is intended to supply the immediate need for organization, but is 
that it attempts to use two systems: Divisional and Departmental. 
In general, the Chancellor recommended an academic organization 
with the following characteristics: 

1. A Dean of Faculty - reporting to the Chancellor 

2. Four divisions - each headed by a chairman 

3. Fourteen departments - each headed by a chairman 

4. Advisory committees at the divisional and depart- 

mental level 

There was active discussion and recommendation for change 
in the sections as shown on attached document. After further com- 
ment, Chancellor Ryan requested the committee to take a stand, 
with respect to the document, even though it may be resubmitted' 
with recommended changes in a year. 

Chairman Troy expressed the committee's general sense of 
approval of the document with the understanding it will continue to 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be studied. Thereupon motion was made, seconded, and it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the temporary policy on Division Structure 
for the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

On motion made and seconded, it was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the appointment of Department Chairmen as 
listed. 



Humanities 

English 

French 

German 

Philosophy 

Spanish 



A. Fergusion, Acting Chairman of Division 

I. Stock, Acting Chairman 

John MacCombie, Acting Chairman 

Alfred Hoelzel, Acting Chairman 

Bernard Elevitch, Acting Chairman 

James Ryan, Acting Chairman 

programs in Art, Classics, Italian, Music 



29^ 



O I 



(Staffs and 
and Russian to be administered by Division Chairman) 



I 



Natural Sciences 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Physics 



Social Sciences 

Economics 

History 

Politics 

Psychology 

Socio logy- An thr. 

Mathematics 



E. Becker, Chairman of Division 
Nevin Weaver, Chairman 
Joseph Knoll, Acting Chairman 
Donald Lyons, Chairman 

R. Powers, Chairman of Division 
Harold Wolozin, Chairman 
Louis Ruchames, Chairman 
George Goodwin, Chairman 
Bernard Rosenblatt, Chairman 
Richard Robbins, Chairman 

Taffee Tanimoto, Chairman of Division 



] 



The Dean of the Medical School then spoke to the meeting, 
briefly describing the personnel actions to be presented to the 
Board of Trustees at its next meeting. These were: John G. King 
for Hospital Administrator; Dr. James Ashmore for Chairman of De- 
partment and Professor of Biochemistry; Dr. S. L. Clark, Jr., 
Chairman of Department and Professor of Anatomy. Dean Soutter 
described the academic background and experience of these men and 
the contribution they would make to the Medical School. Formal 
action will be proposed at the regular meeting of the Board of 
Trustees . 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




Rohe'ryt "J. McCartne/ 
Secretary (/Board of Trusftee: 




Medical 
School - 
Personnel 






2982 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

November 1, 1967, 10:00 a.m., Conference Room, UM at Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; Trustees 
Brown, Crowley, Emerson, Frechette, Gordon, 
Maginnis; Treasurer Johnson Secretary McCartney 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Soutter, Planning Officer 
Littlefield, Dean Gagnon, UM/B Planning Officer 
O'Brien, Associate Dean Stockwell; Miss Coulter; 
Mr. Torkelsen - Edward Durrell Stone, Inc. 
Mr. Kay Alexander - Sasaki, Dawson & DeMay, Inc. 
Mr. Perry - Sasaki, Dawson & DeMay, Inc. 
Mr. Nelson Aldrich - Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty 
Mr. R. Scott Quinlan - Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty 
Mr. Leslie M. Greig - UMass Medical School 
Mr. Donald Ritchie - Ritchie Associates Archi- 
tects 
Mr. W. J. Mello, Jr. - Ritchie Associates 

Architects 
Mr. Peter Moyes - Ritchie Associates Architects 
Mr. D. H. Ramseth - Ellerbe Associates 
Mr. Robert C. Terhune - Jackson & Moreland 
Mr. Frank D. Gediman - Bureau of Building 

Construction 
Mr. James Hamilton - Consultant to Universty of 

Massachusetts 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting and asked Dean Souttei 
to proceed with the submission of plans for preliminary design for 
the hospital. 

Dean Soutter stated he had asked the architectural firm of 
Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty to present the plans for the entrance to 
the Medical School and Ritchie Associates, architects and engineers, 
for the program, to present the plans for the hospital. He then 
introduced Mr. Nelson W. Aldrich and Mr. Scott Quinlan of Campbell, 
Aldrich & Nulty to the meeting. Using charts and a scale table 
model, Mr. Aldrich described the proposed entrances to the Medical 
School and to the garage. He indicated the various areas throughout 
the building and the propose pattern of entrance and exit. Mr. 
Aldrich expanded on the advantage of the single entrance as shown on 
the plans to serve the public entrance to the hospital, auditorium 
and medical school. He stated it was functional, efficient and 
aesthetically desirable. 

Mr. Quinlan stated that until the operational manner of 
the garage is resolved, any further change in plan may be impractical 
Mr. Aldrich emphasized that the proposed method of parking reduced 
the black top to approximately 3/4 of an acre. Eight hundred cars 
will be accommodated in the first phase. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



2983 



D 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Soutter invited discussion of the proposal, express- 
ing some personal reservations on the practicality of the single 
entrance . 

There was general discussion during the course of which 
Mr. James Hamilton, hospital consultant, endorsed the basic idea of 
the plan proposed, especially the single entrance. He described 
the new approach of bringing technicians to the patients, under 
modern techniques, rather than transporting patients to the various 
technicians. He expressed the view that the main entrance is 
perhaps too close to the hospital, but otherwise the overall plan 
is entirely suitable. 

Chairman Haigis commented that the combination of stu- 
dents, visitors and a potential 600 persons who can be accommodated 
in the auditorium, could overcrowd the lobby area. Mr. Aldrich ex- 
plained that the lobby is in fact twice as large as that in the old 
Metropolitan theatre in Boston. In effect, there are two lobbies. 

Mr. Ritchie and Mr. Ramseth of Ritchie Associates ex- 
pressed reservations about driveway congestion at the point of left 
hand turn immediately in front of the main entrance. Otherwise, 
they liked the single entrance. 

Mr. Gediman of the Bureau of Building Construction ex- 
pressed concern about the single entrance principally as it relates 
to the auditorium. He stated it warrants considerably more study 
than it is now being given. Mr. Aldrich stated that as the users 
of the building become familiar with it, many will enter through to 
the garage and then walk to the complex from the garage, thus 
diluting some of the surface level traffic. 

President Lederle said there is always conflict between 
aesthetics on one hand and cost on another. He asked for a com- 
parison of costs, stressing that it is imperative the very tight 
budget be adhered to. This must be considered in establishing 
final approval of the plan. 

Mr. Aldrich gave assurance that the preliminary costs had 
been accepted, and referred to Mr. Gediman for confirmation. Mr. 
Gediman confirmed that there has been overall approval, but not of 
specific items. He stated his concern that there is a great deal 
of unusable space as far as dollars are concerned in the present 
design. 

Dean Soutter voiced his objection as (1) the problem of 
distance (200 ') before one reaches the entrance to the medical 
school; also (2) tradition, stating he had always been used to two 
entrances . 

Dean Soutter outlined briefly the different types of 
functions expected to be held in the auditorium, as a guide to the 
kind and amount of traffic to be expected. This was in support of 
the proposal that the auditorium should be moved back toward the 
medical school and the corridor shortened. Some of the uses were 
described as: meetings of doctors, medical school functions, social 



2984 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

functions (annual school play for example), meetings of para- 
medical groups, courses in pediatrics, etc. Dean Soutter forecasts 
that use of the auditorium for outside functions may well be greater 
than internal use of the facility. 

Mr. Aldrich stressed the need for unanimity within the 
hospital design. Treasurer Johnson suggested the possibility of 
running a drive through the building and allowing people to dismount 
from vehicles directly outside of the medical science building. Mr. 
Aldrich anticipated that the answers would be available at the next 
session. 

Dean Soutter next presented Mr. John Stockwell, Associate 
Dean of the University Medical School, who described the plans for 
the hospital and its programs. He asked Mr. Ritchie and members of 
his firm to present the formal plans. 

Mr. Stockwell said the purpose of the hospital is to 
support the programs of the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School. He outlined some of the planning principles: 

1. service to the sick and injured. It is expected 
this will be primarily a referral center. 

2. clinical research furnishing patients data processing, 
personnel aids to anyone in the structure. 

3. preventive medicine and public health. 

4. coordinating and improvement of health services 
throughout the Commonwealth. 

5. undergraduate and graduate medical education and 
other scientific medical programs. 

6. allied health sciences programs. 

7. additional programs as they may be phased in. 

8. special functions in the hospital itself. 

Mr. Stockwell said the plan is to develop a complete and 
comprehensive group of services so that the most simple and the 
most complex illness can be treated. The hospital will be a 
referral center, with relationships with the community hospitals. 

The standard of performance should be optimal. It should 
furnish a qualitative example for the students. The plan is for 
100 undergraduate medical students; 400 beds; 100,000 outpatient 
contacts annually. 

Mr. Stockwell said that hospital admissions will be based 
on acuteness of medical need; then the educational requirement of 
the medical school. Massachusetts residents will receive priority. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2985 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Proven systems and equipment will be used at all times. To date, 
40 consultants have been used and have proven most helpful. 

Dean Soutter commented that a maximum degree of 
cooperation has been received from the hospital architects, and 
great effort extended by them to prepare for the meeting, including 
development of the brochure which had been supplied to those pre- 
sent (Document T68-024) . 

Mr. Ritchie said this is the first opportunity to 
present the results of many months of work. He said the architects 
had tried to develop a functional hospital, starting initially 
with a 400-bed unit, basically a tower on a base, for efficiency of 
operation. This will allow opportunity for expansion and flexibili- 
ty. He added that every department has the capacity of being ex- 
panded horizontally. The addition of four floors would bring the 
capacity to 600 beds; a projection in the site plan for a duplicate 
building would provide accommodations for double the current 
hospital size. 

Mr. Ritchie then showed plans of various floors and 
related one to the other and to the other functions provided within 
the building. (See Document T68-024 above) 

The top floor will contain mechanical equipment, 
transformers and air conditioning equipment; the bases will 
accommodate services such as receiving, kitchen, laundry and house- 
keeping. The floors in between are generally reserved for patient 
care as indicated on the document submitted. 

Mr. Ritchie explained in great detail the intended 
operation of the proposed building and the theory of the plan. The 
hospital building has two parts: tower and a base. There are two 
stories underground. The hospital, basically is in the form of a 
modified cross (see diagram, Document T68-024) . Each nersing sta- 
tion is designed to accommodate 28 beds. 

Mr. Ritchie showed slides of the building including 
a "helicopter view" and stressed the efforts toward efficiency of 
handling people. He added that conveyor systems are proposed where 
suitable (and economically feasible) with the goal of automation 
within reasonable bounds of practicality. 

Mr. Hamilton, consultant, commented on the advantages 
of the design, concluding in general that his only criticism is a 
lack of sufficient private rooms due to limited space. Features 
that are important in the design, and make this building different 
from any hospital of this sort are: 

1. separation of visitors lobby from patients entrance 
to increase privacy; also, someone will be there to 
look after the patient immediately upon his arrival. 

2. separate intensive care units on each floor. 

3. emphasis on vertical travel of patients (less 

expensive) 



2986 



COMMITTEE 



Library 

at 

Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hamilton, in response to query, stated that nursing 
stations for 28 beds were established for the purpose of limiting 
the distance from the patient to the service, making it possible for 
a nursing team to work out of one center. He demonstrated on the 
chart the application of this principle. He also explained that 
adding floors, above the four shown, would involve a number of other 
services which would be affected, i.e. delivery of food, supplies, 
etc. and that a better degree of flexibility, at that point, is 
secured by expanding out rather than expanding upward. 

The circulation flow, inside the emergency entrance, was 
discussed. Mr. Hamilton stated there is adequate space even in 
event of disaster; Dean Soutter concurred. 

In response to Treasurer Johnson's expressed concern that 
the route to the elevators appears to be circuitous and public, 
Dean Soutter said consideration had been given to this point, which 
is a valid one. Dean Stockwell stated that this problem has been 
solved. He assured the Treasurer that the patient corridor would be 
completely isolated from the public corridor. 

Treasurer Johnson felt there was not enough space provided 
for the turning of ambulances where they approach the emergency 
entrance. Dean Stockwell concurred. This will be looked into. 
The Treasurer stated it is a handsome building. 

Dean Stockwell said a snack bar will accommodate 50 people 
(1500 square feet) and a gift shop will occupy 600 square feet. 

In response to the Chairman's call for other questions, 
Trustee Maginnis commented that the chief work now needing to be 
done relates to the outside circulation of vehicles. This was 
agreed upon. 



There being no other questions, the architects left the 



meeting. 



Treasurer Johnson announced that a full presentation would 
be made to the Board of Trustees at its meeting on November 17, 1967 
This is to include the charts and other visual aids used at the com 
mittee meeting this day. Thereupon, on motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the preliminary design for hospital plans, 
subject to the check list of exceptions on file 
in the Office of the Treasurer. 

Mr. J. Littlefield, Planning Officer, introduced Mr. 
Torkelsen of the office of Edward Durrell Stone. Mr. Littlefield 
reminded the committee that although plans had been approved for the 
library at Amherst, concern had been expressed whether the building 
should be constructed in brick or limestone. As a result, colored 



COMMITTEE 



I 



298? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

renderings were prepared and these were displayed by Mr. Torkelsen. 
Mr. Littlefield explained that the difference in cost between brick 
and limestone is approximately $800,000 more for the limestone. In 
orden to construct the library of limestone and still come within 
the terms of the funds available for this purpose, it would be 
necessary to reduce the building by two stories. Dean Belluschi and 
Edward Durrell Stone had been asked for professional advice as to 
their aesthetic preference, to insure a decision compatible with 
other buildings on the campus adjacent to the library site. Each 
had replied that either material would harmonize with the existing 
and planned buildings. 

Mr. Torkelsen read to the committee a letter to President 
Lederle from Mr. Stone expressing his opinion on this subject. 

There was discussion, which encompassed the aesthetic 
appeal of the two materials, the relative maintenance cost of each 
and the comparative current market price of limestone and brick. 
Chairman Haigis summarized that since there is acceptance by Messrs 
Stone and Belluschi of either material, the committee should select 
the one which will keep the project within the budget. Trustee 
Crowley emphasized that we need the planned space and should not 
sacrifice space for exterior finish material. 

Trustee Gordon suggested securing samples of brick so that 
the actual color and texture of the material could be inspected. It 
was agreed that Mr. Torkelsen would do so, and also prepare an esti 
mate of cost of maintenance: brick vs. limestone, for the 
November 17 meeting. 

During a recess for luncheon, Treasurer Johnson informally 
discussed the trash disposal problem of the University. He stated 
the Towns of Amherst and Hadley both refuse to permit further dump- 
ing of rubbish. Previously, the Commonwealth's Department of Public 
Health had refused permission to install a trash burner. 

The meeting reconvened at 1:35 p.m Messrs. Alexander and 
Perry of Sasaki, Dawson & DeMay Associates joined the meeting to- 
gether with Mr. Francis O'Brien, Planning Officer at the University 
in Boston. They posted a Site Evaluation Schedule (Document 
T68-025) and an area map (Document T68-026 in possession of the 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees) which designated areas of inter- 
est for the proposed UM at Boston site. 

Mr. O'Brien said this was a "first sorting". The display 
included all past sites considered and evaluation on the basis of 
size, availability and accessibility. In early December, it is 
anticipated that a final listing will show only those sites which 
look promising. At that time, it is hoped to go to the full Board 
of Trustees, the Governor and the legislative leadership for their 
review. 

Mr. Alexander will develop presentation material for 
public release. 



Trash 
Disposal 



UM at 
Boston 



2988 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The time schedule indicated approximately a December 13 
date for a committee decision. 

Mr. Kay Alexander then briefly reviewed the factors 
determining proposed site size as recounted in previous minutes. 
He then asked Mr. Perry to describe the various geographic areas 
highlighted on the Greater Boston area map. Mr. Perry reviewed all 
sites considered in the last two years. He applied the criteria of 
size with respect to the several locations. He stated the ultimate 
plan is to end up with four to eight sites at the end of this period 
Mr. Perry stated that Columbia Point, Governor Shirley site, High- 
land Park area, Copley Square and Wollaston Golf Course had received 
extensive investigation.- The other prospective sites would now be 
brought to that level of investigation so that there would be 
reasonable basis for getting down to the final sites to be recom- 
mended as primary possibilities. 

Mr. Alexander then asked for approval of the direction 
taken and which sites outlined are felt by the Trustees to represent 
superior possibilities. 

Considerable discussion followed. Trustee Gordon stated 
the Board had taken a vote on the philosophy as to the kind of site 
which would be sought, yet it appeared from the minutes of a previou 
meeting (which he did not attend) that the philosophy had changed. 
Chairman Haigis explained that it had been decided to investigate 
additional sites beyond those in the core city. Trustees Crowley 
and Emerson added that the committee had agreed to enlarge its in- 
vestigation to include core city points and also suburban or fringe 
area sites for back up if needed, and to justify better its final 
decision when it is ready to make a firm recommendation. 

Mr. Alexander will endeavor to assemble data on all sites 
now under consideration by November 17, 1967. If limitation of 
time prohibits this, he will make a summary of the nine most 
attractive locations within the group. 

Trustee Gordon expressed concern and disappointment at 
the progress to date of the investigation for a site. He recounted 
the plans over the past year for definitive action and stressed the 
need for additional thrust to pursue the project. He rejected the 
idea of exploring additional suburban locations stating: we are 
delaying the process, diffusing the Board vote. We are not proceed' 
ing in an orderly fashion - tied to a philosophy - as expressed by 
the previous Board vote which called for concentration on core city 
sites . 

Mr. Alexander agreed to supply Trustees Maginnis and 
Gordon in depth investigative material on previously rejected sites 
This data had been supplied to the committee at a prior meeting, 
which the aforementioned Trustees did not attend. 

Treasurer Johnson then asked for approval and acceptance 
of various completed projects. On motion made and seconded, it was 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees acceptance 
of the following completed projects: 

U702 #20 Addition to Sewer, Water & Drainage 
Warner Brothers, Incorporated 
Completed: 10/27/64 

U60-2 #2 Replacement of Main Physical Education Fields 
H. J. Madore, Inc. 
Completed: 10/19/66 

U63-7 #6 Steam & Electric Distribution System 
Daniel O'Connell's Sons, Inc. 
Completed: 9/1/65 

U63-7#6A Addition to Steam & Electric Distribution 
System 
Collins Electric Company (13,800 KW switch- 
gear) 
(purchase order) Completed: 8/31/65 

U63-7#6C Additions to Stean & Electric Distribution 
System 
S. Volpe & Co., Inc. 
Completed: 6/9/66 

U63-7 #7 Sewer, Water & Drainage 
Was Brothers, Inc. 
Completed: 10/28/65 

U63-7 $8 Boiler Plant Improvements (Induced Draft 

Fans) 
Arden Engineering Company 
Completed: 11/23/66 

U63-7#10 Additions to Steam & Electric Distribution 
Systems 
Arden Engineering Co. 
Completed: 6/23/67 

The meeting was then adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 





Roberjc/J . McCartney 
Secretary, (/Board of Trusted 




Completed 
Projects 



2990 



COMMITTEE 



Malawi 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

November 10, 1967, 11:00 a.m., Whitmore Administration Building, 

Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Maginnis; 
Treasurer Johnson. 



Provost Tippo, Dean Hunsberger, Dean 
Moore, Dean Spielman; Mrs. Burn; Messrs. 
Doubleday, DePuy, Hofer, Maki, Quint, 
Ellert, Paulsen; Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. with a 
Review of all Foreign Programs at the University. He asked Dean 
Spielman to describe the program at Malawi. 

Dean Spielman said the program at Malawi has been kept 
small so that it could be staffed by members of the University's 
own faculty. In addition the country of Malawi was selected since 
it had a stable government and presented no language barrier and 
thus seemd the most practical. The program began in 1963 and the 
cost has been $562,466; this is provided by the Federal Government. 
It is scheduled to continue until 1970. Ten members of the Uni- 
versity staff have been sent to Malawi in the course of the program 

Dean Spielman said there are nine, four-year students and 
two graduate students from Malawi presently on campus in Amherst as 
well as two short-term students, government employees, for special 
courses in agricultural education. The Dean circulated pictures of 
the buildings in Malawi related to the project, stating the school 
opened last September with sixty students. The President and Dean 
Spielman have been invited to a dedication on November 26, 1967. 

In response to question, Dean Spielman stated that the 
program will encompass only agricultural subjects as it is sponsored 
by the State Department for that purpose and is wholly funded by the 
Agency for International Development. The program does not entail 
additions to our staff except for low-cost appointees to temporarily 
replace those members on loan to Malawi. 

Dean Spielman said it is difficult to prove or measure, 
but agricultural production is improving rapidly, according to 
observation. He advised that the policy which has been established 
of replacing foreign personnel with trained native staff is develop- 
ing satisfactorily. 

Dean Spielman briefly outlined the program on campus for 
training of foreign extension workers and educators. He said in 

1964 there were eight groups, from eight different countries; in 

1965 there were twelve groups from thirteen different countries and 
in 1966 there were thirteen groups from twelve different countries. 



a 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2991 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

This year there are fourteen representing ten to twelve countries; 
these for a varying length of time, but the minimum is two weeks 
and usually four to six months for specialized training in agri- 
culture and extension methods. 

Mr. Doubleday, coordinator for the program, then describee 
the Tororo Girls School in Uganda, East Africa. He said the progran 
begain in 1960, in response to a proposal asking for help in erect 
ing and operating a girls' school. The school is open to all tribes 
and all religions and offers programs suitable for the developing 
needs of the area. Mr. Doubleday said there were only three high 
schools for girls in the entire country at the time. Education for 
men was somewhat better, but the need was great for educated women 
to play their full role in a developing nation. Education of girls, 
it was felt, would raise home standards and improve health and 
nutrition, as well as aid in solving the critical personnel shortage 
in many areas, releasing men in certain positions for other types oi 
work. 

Mr. Doubleday said, in response to a request for a 
feasibility study, the University in 1961 sent a team to survey the 
need; the result was a report which recommended construction of 
buildings, proposed curriculum, staff, and so forth to the United 
States Agency for International Development. A year later, Dean of 
the School of Education Purvis made a follow-up survey, including a 
visit to Uganda. As a result a contract was negotiated between the 
University of Massachusetts in cooperation with the United States 
Agency for International Development and Uganda in August, 1963. 
(Document T68-029) 

The progress to date, as reported by Mr. Doubleday, in- 
cluded sending the first technician to Uganda in 1963 to coordinate 
the activities of the project, including work with the architect, 
and serving as liaison between the University of Massachusetts, 
United States Agency for International Development, the Ministry of 
Education and the Ministry of Works. The School opened in January, 
1965. At present there are 13 staff teachers and another is planned 
to be added in January. Although these teachers are considered to 
be representing the University of Massachusetts, none is from our 
faculty, all were recruited by the School of Education. The first 
class of girls entered in February, 1965, a second class in January, 
1966 and a third class in January, 1967. It is expected by February 
1968 there will be an enrollment of 500 girls, with a complete pro- 
gram comprised of Grades 9 - 14. The curriculum includes two years 
of broad general education, the last two years will prepare some of 
the girls for direct employment at the end of four years of training 

Three Ugandan girls are presently at the University of 
Massachusetts and one at the University of Kansas; they will return 
as teachers at the completion of their studies in the United States 
An increase in participant training is anticipated. 

Mr. Doubleday said the program is funded through 1970. 

The school is gaining in national recognition and is the largest 
girls' school in the country at the present time. Constant effort 
is made to develop programs geared to the needs of the regional 
economy. Mr. Doubleday circulated pictures showing the dedication, 
buildings, personnel, local color and vegetation. 



Uganda 
Program 



2 



Oxford 
Program 



COMMITTEE 



Bologna 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Hofer then described to the committee the 
summer program at Oxford University (England) . He said this progran 
has been established for two years. There were 100 students last 
summer, 50 graduate students and 50 undergraduate students. 

Professor Hofer stated that Oxford Dons teach the courses 
It is a six-week program, duplicating the six-week program on 
campus. The student cost is $750 and includes six weeks' stay at 
St. Hilda's College; also, the transportation over and return, room 
and board while there and some extracurricula, such as four theatre 
visits, and travel to see the sights of London. Professor Hofer 
said the entire sports facilities of the college were made available 
for the modest sum of $55. He was most enthusiastic about the pro- 
gram and said it had been entirely successful and well received, as 
indicated by the fact that Trinity College had offered their 
facilities for future consideration. He said it was really, in 
fact, a Five Colleges, Inc. program, in the light of the experience 
that there were nine Smith girls, 50 University of Massachusetts 
students, three Mount Holyoke girls and one Amherst student in- 
cluded in the group. The students indicated to Professor Hofer that 
the association with other colleges added dimension to the program. 
Photographs of the accommodations and surroundings and participants 
were circulated. 

In response to Trustee Maginnis ' query, Professor Hofer 
stated a B average is required before a student is accepted as part 
of the group. To date no students have failed to pass the course. 
It is planned to conduct the same type of program for the summer of 
1968, from June 24 through August 13. 

Professor Quint then described the program at Bologna, 
Italy, which is entering its third year. He said it is essentially 
a broad Humanities program; effort is made to make the programs 
constant with the environment. He stated the courses for next year 
will include Renaissance Art; Renaissance History; Italian litera- 
ture in translation. Since the students are not proficient in the 
Italian language, one of the great values of the program is the 
adjustment the student must make when traveling through the country, 
and thus making his own way. The group included both men and women 
students, one or two of whom were graduate students. The four-day 
teaching week established permitted time for travel, including 
field trips which are a central part of the program. The field 
trips vary in length and duration. Professor Quint said what the 
students see is planned to have some relation to their course of 
study. 

The faculty is recruited entirely from the United States, 
Professor Quint said, and almost entirely from the University of 
Massachusetts. Efforts have been made, at the suggestion of Chair- 
man Troy, in the past, to secure native Italian professors, but 
obstacles such as (1) Language - requirement that they speak 
English (2) Summer schedules - which do not lend themselves to 
teaching in the summer (3) Manner of teaching American students - 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Continental regime is entirely different, have made it impossible. 
Professor Quint will, however, continue his efforts to recruit 
Italian faculty for this program. 

Professor Quint stated that on all field trips, students 
are encouraged to develop a sense of discovery by independently 
planning, rather than joining groups. The students are taken to 
the opera and encouraged to take advantage of all area facilities. 

The Bologna program is not operated on a Five College 
basis. Professor Quint stated while there have been students from 
Mount Holyoke, as well as from the University, there has been none 
from Smith or Amherst, adding that Smith has a program in Italy 
and hence no need to join. 

The Bologna program is conducted in a very handsome, ar- 
conditioned building (the John Hopkins Building) . The cost of the 
program from June 20 - August 11 is $850. It would be possible to 
reduce the cost slightly, but in doing so it would reduce certain 
amenities Professor Quint felt the students should have. 

At the end of the Bologna program, there is a three-week 
period of free time for the students, but all return together 
August 29. Professor Q U i n t circulated a copy of the budget, indi- 
cating it was about the same each year. 

In summary, Professor Quint said until recently the group 
has not included Italian majors as such, but there are now some 
students in this category. 

The possibility was explored of all these program becom- 
ing Five College programs. The benefits and disadvantages were 
discussed. President Lederle suggested further examination and 
consideration. 

Chairman Troy introduced Professor DePuy, who presented 
the report on the Madrid Graduate Summer Seminar. 

Professor DePuy described the program offered in Madrid 
during the summer of 1967, the first year of the program. She 
stated that collaboration which had been established with the Bryn 
Mawr program had been extremely helpful, for this was a much older 
program. 

Professor DePuy said the emphasis was on graduate students 
These students had an opportunity to meet outstanding teachers and 
scholars and deal on a day-to-day basis with people of exceptional 
calibre in their native country. The students were housed in 
pensions and with Spanish families. The faculty was recruited from 
the University of Madrid and were men who had been exposed to the 
United States methodology. The course were taugh in Spanish; only 
students fluent in Spanish were accepted for the program. The pro- 
gram, with its broad exposure, quickened the gaining of expertise in 



3 



Madrid 
Program 



2994 



COMMITTEE 



Freiburg 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the language so that, Professor DePuy said, it became the equivalert 
of a year's study of the language. 

The total cost of the program in Madrid, to the student, 
was $875, and included all but optional travel at the end. She 
said an undergraduate course in art, offered at the Del Prado 
Museum, was thoroughly enjoyed by both students and professors. 
There were thirteen students in the 1967 program. 

Professor DePuy is currently actively recruiting for 
next year's program and is hopeful it will result in securing 45 
students. She described the avenues she is pursuing in an effort 
to stimulate wide interest in the program, including responses from 
other colleges in the valley. 

Professor Ellert next presented a summary of the Atlantic 
Studies program at the University of Freiburg, Germany. He prefaced 

his discussion by a description of the mechanism employed to 
establish the program and the difficult and great amount of work 
entailed in preparation covering a period of about three and one- 
half years. 

Professor Ellert said in 1966-67, the first year of 
operation, there were 35 students (13 undergraduates, 22 graduates) 
Eleven of the undergraduates were German majors, fourteen of the 
graduates were German majors. In the current year there are 29 
students (7 undergraduates; 22 graduates). Four undergraduates and 
seventeen graduates are German majors. 

It is anticipated there will be an enrollment of approxi- 
mately thirty students for 1968-69. The cost to the student is 
$1800-$2000. The students live in private houses and thus become 
completely immersed in the whole culture of their environment. The 
students are required to know German language thoroughly. Professor 
Ellert circulated descriptive postcards of the area. 

The students are required to take an eleven-month course; 
it is a program difficult to define, said Professor Ellert. The 
students are taught by our own staff and by the University of 
Freiburg staff. The teaching moves from German to English and back 
again. The students also take courses of the University of Freiburg 
professors which gives them an opportunity to mingle. The courses 
taught are for the most part inter-disciplinary, international 
areas, concerned with: ART, HISTORY, ECONOMY, PHILOSOPHY, 
SOCIOLOGY, LITERATURE, GERMAN, ENGLISH. One of the important things 
a student gets out of such a program is thorough immersion in a 
culture, said Professor Ellert. 

Professor Ellert stated that Freiburg is one of the most 
beautiful cities in Germany, as well as being geographically well 
located so that the scholars may easily visit France, Switzerland, 
Austrai, Italy and great centers of Germany, such as Munich. He 
said most of the students take advantage of this proximity. 



COMMITTEE 



o 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In response to discussion, Professor Ellert stated it is 
most important to screen students who go into programs in foreign 
countries to be sure they are adaptable. Professor Paulsen 
affirmed that the group has been screened for the impending year anc 
he is confident they will be suitable and will reflect credit on 
the University. 

Dean Hunsberger stated Vice-Dean Maki has been asked to 
be Chairman of a reconstituted Atlantic Studies Center Committee, 
which will serve as a planning committee during the remainder of 
the academic year. Eight departments will be represented. The 
purpose of the committee is to review the operation to date; 
examine the possibility of an Atlantic Studies Program on the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts campus and recommend a plan for develop- 
ment. 

Professor Paulsen has been exploring the possibility of 
developing institutional tieswith other universities who have indi- 
cated interest in this program - an additional reason to establish 
further foundation here. 

Dean Hunsberger presented a request for a year's extension 
of the program (Document T68-030) with the same budget as the pre- 
vious year. 

Chairman Troy thanked them for their presentation and 
they left the meeting. The meeting then continued during luncheon 
at the Southwest Dining Commons #7. 

There was discussion of the Student Handbook for 1967-68 
(Document T68-013) which had previously been discussed at the 
October 9, 1967 meeting of the Student Activities Committee with 
the student representatives and members of the faculty. It was 
noted that this is not the permanent or final listing of the rules 
and regulations; there will be a final, thorough review, by next 
spring, at which time any changes will be incorporated. 

Trustee Maginnis drew attention to the fact that in the 
description of Memorial Hall it should also include the dedication 
in honor of World War II veterans. The President said considera- 
tion should also be given to the section relating to student safety 
and environmental health, adding a statement clarifying that the 
academic community is one in which we carry on debate and offer 
opportunity for all points of view to be expressed and heard with- 
out interference. After further discussion, Provost Tippo asked 
that this document be read with care and that suggestions and 
recommendations be submitted at the time of final review. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
rules and regulations contained in Document 
T68-013 presented to this meeting be and hereby 
are adopted as rules and regulations for the 



Atlantic 

Studies 

Center 



D 



COMMITTEE 



Faculty 
Senate 

Constitution 
Amendment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



management and control of the affairs of the 
University and for its faculty, students and 
employees; that the enforcement procedures 
and penalties set forth therein be and hereby 
are adopted and imposed for violation thereof; 
that the president of the University be and he 
hereby is authorized and directed to conduct 
continuing studies of the subject matter of 
such rules and regulations and to present 
recommendations to the Trustees for amendment 
thereof and that the action hereby taken shall 
not constitute an amendment or repeal of any 
policy, rule or regulation heretofore adopted 
by the Trustees after the enactment of 
Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 but shall 
constitute an amendment of any rule or 
regulation theretofore adopted to the extent 
necessary to conform such earlier rules and 
regulations to those adopted hereby. 

Provost Tippo next introduced a proposed amendment to the 
Constitution of the Faculty Senate of the University at Amherst, as 
related to the Secretary of the Senate. After discussion, motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Faculty Senate Constitution be amended as follows: 

1. Add 4 (b) : "4(b). The Secretary of the Senate 
shall be an ex officio member of the Senate 
with the power to vote." 

2. Renumber 4(b) thru 4(g) as 4(c) thru 4(h). 

3. Amend 6(c) so that it shall read : "6(c). The 
President of the University shall be the Presi- 
ckit of the Senate and shall normally preside at 
its meetings; in the absence of the President, or 
if the President so desires, the Provost shall 
preside; in the absence of both the President and 
the Provost, or if each or both so desire, the 
Secretary of the Senate shall preside; in the 
absence of all three officials, the Senate shall 
elect a temporary presiding officer." 

4. Delete all of 6(e) and substitute the following; : 



"6(e). The Senate shall 
among the members of the 
shall be the administrat 
and consequently it shal 
the activities of the Se 
oversee the implementati 
and to serve as official 
The Secretary shall also 
Faculty". 



choose a Secretary from 

Faculty. The Secretary 
ive officer of the Senate, 
1 be his duty to coordinate 
nate and its committees, to 
on of Senate enactments, 

spokesman of the Senate. 

serve as Secretary of the 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



5. Add 8(d) : "8(d). The Secretary of the Senate 
shall be an ex officio non-voting member of all 
standing and ad hoc committees of the Senate, 
except the Nominating Committee, and except 
those committee of which he is (by Constitutional 
or By-Law provision) an ex officio voting member." 

6. Amend the first sentence of 8(g) . ( the Committee 
on Committees provision) so that it shall read : 
"8(g) (2). Its membership shall be one elected 
senator representing each of the Schools and 
Colleges of the University (except the College 

of Arts and Sciences which shall have one repre- 
sentative from each of the three Divisions), the 
Secretary of the Senate ex officio , and one member 
of the Administration, the latter to be appointed 
by the President." 

7. Renumber 8(d) thru 8(1) as 8(e) thru 8(m). 

The Provost then described a second proposed amendment to 
the Constitution of the Faculty Senate for the University at Amherst 
as related to membership, to include title of Director of University 
Libraries, and motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that para- 
graph 4(a) of the Constitution of the University 
of Massachusetts Faculty Senate be amended to read 
as follows: 

4. Membership . (a) The following officials of 
the University shall be ex officio members 
of the Senate with the power to vote: Presi- 
dent, Provost, Treasurer...., and Director 
of University Libraries . 

Chairman Troy said the Trustees had voted permission for 
regional exchange students who wished to enter as freshmen to pay 
in-state tuition rates - thus hoping to add impetus to the exchange 
program enrollment. However in 1966 there were 13 who were in 
various programs; since the extended program there are only 7. 

The President said the New England States are not being 
used very widely; the faculty exchange is working better. We export 
many more scholars than we import, the program really doesn't cost 
the Commonwealth anything. 

Chairman Troy expressed his continuing interest in the 
effort to expand the horizons of the University students, through 
contact with (other students) areas of the country. He said he 
would like to see a series of agreements with comparable universities 
throughout the nation so that any student at the University of Massa 

chusetts could have an opportunity to select where he would like to 
go- 



299? 



2998 



COMMITTEE 



Marine 

Sciences 

Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chairman said it would be a great advance to secure 
better group distribution of students and thus help to dispel 
evident over-provincialism. 

The President said this is a philosophy he has often 
expounded, stating Massachusetts exports 5800 students and accepted 
only 700. 

The meeting reconvened at 2:00 p.m. in Whitmore Admini- 
stration Building. 

Chairman Troy invited the Dean of the Graduate School to 
describe the University's Marine Sciences program to the committee. 

Dean Moore said the area of Marine Sciences is a large 
and ambitious program and he then outlined and defined the scope 
within the framework of 

(1) what has been done 

(2) what could be done 

(3) the ultimate, as related to the University 

The Dean reviewed a document supplied to the President a 
year ago (November 5, 1966) which outlined the possibilities in the 
program, and indicated a number of things that since then have been 
done. 

Dean Moore explored in considerable detail the background 
and history of the program at the University. He described the 
Master's program now offered in this field as well as the involve- 
ment of the School of Agriculture and its program in the food 
sciences in the area of fisheries food microbiology problems and 
the study of fish landings. The Dean briefly described the extent 
of the Themis program on campus, supported by the Department of 
Defense and concerned with deep sea submersibles, which is under 
the direction of Dean Picha of the School of Engineering. This 
program received an award of $200,000 from the Federal Government. 

The Dean advised that Chancellor Millard (State Board of 
Higher Education) had appointed a committee, of which Dean Moore 
is a member, to survey the needs for the state as a whole on marine 
science, both public and private, on the theory that programs 
should dovetail. The Dean said this promises to be a most 
effective committee. 

Dean Moore said the faculty at the University includes 
many qualified men, specialists in the areas of marine sciences 
and listed and described their backgrounds. These included 
oceanographers in the Department of Geology, Commonwealth Professor 
trained in marine microbiology, and others. 

The Dean stated some research is being carried on 
compatible with the limited funds allotted for this purpose. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was general discussion. The President commented 
that lack of funds tempered additional progress. The expanding 
needs of a further developed program were explored, encompassing 
equipment, personnel and working sites. The Dean stated the cost 
to move ahead into a front range position would be $1/4 million a 
year for 4 or 5 years . 

Dean Moore summarized by stating - there are two choices: 

(1) continue on a low key effort - this is what we can 

afford. 

(2) advance - at a cost of $1/4 million a year. 

Chairman Troy said the matter must be evaluated in the 
light of other priorities, other programs, such as Continuing Edu- 
cation, Educational Television, Law School, etc. After discussion, 
he said we should continue with the program we have, moving rather 
modestly and wait upon the recommendations of Chancellor Millard's 
committee. 

The President then reverted to a discussion of the 
Freiburg program. He stated his reservations at the amount of 
money expended in this program and questioned whether in fact it 
should not go to some other area of need, such as dormitory enrich- 
ment. He stressed the need to think in terms of the total Uni- 
versity. 

Provost Tippo urged a two or three year period for con- 
sideration and the Chairman expressed his confidence that the pro- 
gram would prove itself within this time. 

President Lederle said, in his capacity as President he 
felt a duty to draw these reservations to the attention of the com- 
mittee; although the program should have a three year trial, it 
is advisable to look at it again in its second year and question 
its overall benefit. The President also reminded the committee that 
such programs as Continuing Education, Educational Television and 
the Law School are pending and that considerable preparation and 
planning has gone into these and consideration should be given to 
moving forward. These programs must be presented formally to the 
Board of Trustees and then to the Board of Higher Education. 

The meeting was then adjourned at 2:50 p.m. 



2999 




sert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of//rustees 




3000 



COMMITTEE 



Site 

Selection 
UM at Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

November 20, 1967, 10:00 a.m., Office of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, Watertown, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Gordon, Maginnis; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Gagnon; Planning Officers Littlefield 
and O'Brien; Messrs. Sasaki, Alexander, 
Chapman and Galehouse of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates. 



Chairman Haigis invited Mr. Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates to present a progress report on the site availabili 
ty study for a permanent UM at Boston campus. He explained that the 
sites considered had been organized into the following categories 



CORE AREA 



CORE FRINGE 



INTERMEDIATE ZONE 



ROUTE 128 



The sites range from Woburn on the north to Braintree on 
the south. All are being considered in relation to the previously 
established site criteria. Mr. Alexander called attention to one 
generalization: the density of the proposed campus would decrease 
as one moves out to fringe areas. Core area sites would range from 
30 to 60 - 70 acres minimum; intermediate zone sites from 70 to 100 
acres minimum; Route 128 corridor sites from 100 to 150 acres 
minimum. 

Mr. Chapman of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates was in- 
vited to present highlights of the site survey report. The follow- 
ing categories and locations were reviewed: 

CORE AREA 

Copley Square-Park Square area 
North Station 

CORE FRINGE AREA 

Highland Park 



INTERMEDIATE ZONE 



Columbia Point 
Governor Shirley 
Wollaston 
Allston 

ROUTE 128 - CORRIDOR SITES 



Watertown 
Murphy Hospital 
Wellington Circle 
Fresh Pond 



West Roxbury Route 93, Woburn 
Woodland Country Club 
Norwood Airport 
Braintree 



r 



[i 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Detailed comment on these sites is contained in Document 
T68-035, " Memorandum on Possible Sites for University of Massachu - 
setts/Boston , " dated November 20, 1967 and issued to the members of 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds by Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates. Representative comment on some of these sites by Mr. 
Chapman follows: 

CORE CITY 

Copley Square-Park Square 

This is a "hard area." Only one or two locations 
would be available: air rights at the interchange plus a few "soft' 
blocks adjacent and nearby. 

North Station 

This is a new possibility. Considerable space is 
available in the railroad yard and at the North Station itself. The 
site offers the largest available block of open land (75 acres), 
closest to downtown Boston. Sixty acres are available in Boston and 
fifteen in Cambridge. A strong asset is the site's proximity to 
public transportation, access to the inner belt and Storrow and 
Memorial Drive. Footings may be soggy. 

CORE FRINGE 

Highland Park 

The Sasaki people are now looking at 30 acres in the 
Highland Park area. This would still displace approximately 12 to 
15 hundred persons. Under investigation also is an air rights 
prospect over the Southwest Corridor. The latter possibility might 
reach 50 acres and involve the displacement of 1500 persons. Con- 
struction costs would be at a premium figure. The site would ex- 
tend over into the Parker Hill area. It would be necessary in the 
preliminary states to work with community groups, rapid transit 
authorities, DPW and the southwest expressway people. 

INTERMEDIATE ZONE 

Columbia Point 

Mr. Chapman stated that this location has "more 
plusses" than some other sites. The land is available. It could 
be expanded by a systematic fill program. Certain questions relat- 
ing to the possibility of a World's Fair being held there in 1975 
should be studied closely. Liabilities include the detachment of 
Columbia Point from the inland area and congestion of traffic at 
"feed in" interchanges. Also mentioned was the proximity to Logan 
International Airport which would provide a considerable noise and 
nuisance and limit the height of buildings. Also, the soil is dump 
land and improvement would come at high cost. There was brief dis- 
cussion on the possibility of adding additional fill to the Columbia 
Point land, even to the extent of including Thompson's Island. 
Chancellor Ryan observed that if the University became seriously 
interested in this site, it should have something to say about use 
of surrounding filled land. Trustee Gordon suggested that any 
further exploration of this site begin with a meeting with the com- 
mittee set up to negotiate for a World's Fair. 



300 



3002 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Governor Shirley Site 

This area is intensively used. Location of the Uni- 
versity here would involve the displacement of some 2,000 jobs, and 
400 homes would need to be preempted. The area is devoted mainly 
to a combination of light industry and residences. Another draw- 
back is that the Everett-Forest Hills rapid transit line will be 
moved further away in the near future, thus depreciating accessibili 
ty. It was also noted that the area is likely to remain landlocked 
for all time in terms of horizontal expansion; also that it is a 
model city's area which would slow up development. 

Allston 

This is a "tight site," in very active industrial use 
with numerous transport and trucking terminals. Air rights could 
be considered to preserve these terminals; however, placement of the 
University here would add congestion to Harvard Square and Central 
Square in Cambridge. On the other hand, the location has good 
access to the Massachusetts Turnpike. 

Wellington Circle 

This is a 40 acre site having relation to the inter' 
state highway. It straddles two major transport arteries. The area 
is under intensive, mixed commercial use. 

Fresh Pond 

A 40 acre site with a potential of an additional 35 
acres. Its principal plus factor is the proximity to rapid trans- 
port. It is in an area of high intensity use, consists of a clay 
pit, and was formerly a dump for the City of Cambridge. 

Wollaston Country Club 

This is a 75 acre site with a potential of an 
additional 100 acres. The location is somewhat comparable to 
Columbia Point. It is about three-quarters of a mile to the nearest 
rapid transit station. There would be community resistance if the 
University attempts to acquire it. However, the Wollaston Country 
Club apparently is prepared to sell. 

Watertown 

This site was placed at the bottom of the list in 
terms of poor access to highways and rapid transit. It consists of 
approximately 60 acres, and there is some possibility of acquiring 
it. 

ROUTE 128 CORRIDOR SITES 

West Roxbury 

This site is bounded in by a cemetery, a dump and 
marshland. However, it may eventually straddle a rapid transit line 
which would actually be an extension of the existing MTA Forest 
Hills-Everett line, utilizing existing New Haven railroad right-of- 
way. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Woodland Country Club 

This site consists of 75 acres of open land, with a 
possibility of acquiring an additional 75 acres. It is located 
near the Massachusetts Turnpike and is approximately 15 to 20 
minutes away from downtown Boston. It is on the Riverside line. 
There is a liability in the capacity to develop and use the surround 
ing land. However, Mr. Chapman felt that both the West Roxbury and 
Woodland sites should be "kept up front" in considering any locatior 
on the Route 128 corridor. 

Woburn 

This site relates to Route 128 and to interstate 
Route 193. It is approximately 30 minutes from downtown Boston and 
consists of a considerable stretch of open land. Transportation 
possibilities include a long-range establishment of rapid transit, 
or utilizing the existing Boston and Maine railroad tracks. 

Murphy General Hospital 

The largest contiguous area consists of 120 acres 
south of the state hospital. The site would require an extension 
of the Harvard-Ashmont line or some other rapid transit connection. 
It is close to Route 2. Nearly all of the land is publicly owned 
(2-3 hundred acres) . 

Norwood Airport 

This site is approximately 30-40 minutes from down- 
town Boston. It lies close to Route 95. 

Braintree 

The site is at the end of what may be called the Old 

Colony Rapid transit line. It may consist of 800 acres, and lies 

close to Route 3. There is a considerable amount of open land. 

Next, Mr. Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
presented and explained two charts showing transit and accessibility 
for a selected group of sites. This material was based on data 
used by the Department of Public Works and is a computerized pro- 
jection. The study "loads" highway and other transit nets with 
1963 data and then with 1975 data. The charts follow: 

Average Travel Times (Minutes) 

To 22 lowest income areas 



From : 

Copley 

Columbia Point 

Wollaston 

Allston 

West Roxbury 

Watertown 

Woodland 



Transit 


Auto 


26 


22 


28* 


24 


35* 


30 


40** 


23 


42* 


33 


47** 


26 


50 


30 



3003 



Diff. Hi-lo 



24 - 11 



3004 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To Metro area (Minutes) 

From : 

Copley 

Columbia Point 

Wollaston 

Allston 

West Roxbury 

Woodland 

Watertown 



Diff. Hi-lo 23-4 

'''assumes improved transit link 
'"""assumes increased capacity feeders 

Requested for recommendations as to the best locations of 
all those considered, the representatives of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates offered the following list of priorities: 



Transit 


Auto 


52 


33 


56* 


34 


60* 


36 


66** 


34 


67* 


37 


75 


32 


75** 


34 



CORE AREA 



Copley-Park Square 
North Station 



CORE AREA FRINGE Highland Park 

INTERMEDIATE ZONE Columbia Point 

ROUTE 128 CORRIDOR West Roxbury 

Woodland Country Club 

The attention of the Trustees was next directed to a flow 
chart indicating the sequence of steps and decisions which needed to 
be taken by the University Trustees and administration as well as by 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates leading to a final determination of 
site for the UM at Boston permanent campus. 



There was extensive discussion. The following key points 



were made : 



* The philosophy of the committee has not changed. 
Prime interest still focuses on a core city site. 

* A possible, ultimate enrollment of 50,000 or 
higher on multiple campus locations should be 
considered as a factor in the site determination. 

* A further, in-depth study of all prime, core 
city sites should be undertaken. Park Square 
should be included. 

* Park Square may well become the nucleus of a 
UM at Boston campus of some sort, regarless 
of whether we go elsewhere later on. Private 
discussion should be undertaken at once with 
several groups and individuals. These in- 
clude: the mayor and his advisers; the Worlds 
Fair Committee; railroad officials and repre- 
sentatives of MBTA. A small committee should 
be appointed for this purpose. 



I 



P 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

* In reality, two long-range plans are required: the 
first, to plan and develop facilities where we are 
presently located in Park Square; the second, to 
plan developments for the new and permanent site. 
In this regard, a firm and clear timetable needs to 
be established at once for the implementation of 
both plans . 

* The prospect of getting additional lease money 
from the Legislature in the absence of having a 
permanent site selected do not appear favorable. 

A sub-committee consisting of Trustees Gordon and 
Maginnis and Chancellor Ryan was appointed by Chairman Haigis to 
make contact as soon as possible with Mayor-Elect White and repre- 
sentatives of other groups outlined above for the purpose of clear- 
ing the path toward immediate progress on a selection of site. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that the Five-Year Capital Outlay 
Program must be presented soon to the Bureau of Building Construc- 
tion and to the Board of Higher Education. Last year, this item 
needed very little updating. Now, however, we must look further 
ahead. Mainly, the projections will concern the Amherst campus. 
The Medical School has its initial appropriation. In the absence 
of a permanent site selection, it is too early to focus in detail 
on the University of Massachusetts at Boston. The Treasurer ob- 
served that we must think of all dollar amounts as approximate due 
to contininuing escalation of construction costs. Further, at the 
request of the BBC, it is essential to put the highest dollar 
figure on all estimates from now on. Planning Officer Littlefield 
was requested to bring out the high points of Document T68-034 con- 
sisting of four parts (A,B,C,D) as follows: 

Five-Year Planning Procedures (Document T68-034 A ) . This 
document contained actual and planned enrollment projections from 
1966 through 1971. It assumes that 200 gross square feet of 
academic and support space (excluding dormitories, commons, etc.) 
will be required per student. Each 1500 student increase requires 
300,000 gross square feet of buildings to be completed each year. 

Mean Assignable Area per Student (Document T68-034 B ) . 
This sheet sets forth statistics of assigned square footage for 
various categories of institutions, including residential space, 
unions and food service and a tabular total of gross square footage 
assignable rated at 70 percent. The statistics were based on a HEW 
College and Universities Facilities Survey. 

Gross Square Feet of Buildings Whose Construction is 
Already Funded (Document T68-034 C ) . This document reflected 
accumulative gross square footage deficit of 139,000 square feet 
(or a student capacity deficit of 695) in the year 1967. The chart 
showed that the University would almost "catch up" in 1970 but that 
the accumulative gross square footage deficit could rise as high as 

530,000 square feet in 1974 (student capacity deficit of 2,650). 



3005 



Five-Year 
Capital 
Outlay 
Program 



3006 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University of Massachusetts Fiscal 1969 Capital Outlay- 
Request (Document T68-034 D) . This chart showed that $300,000 in 
planning funds for the Classroom-Laboratory-Auditorium Building for 
the College of Arts and Sciences will be required in fiscal 1969 as 
the top priority item. Total planning funds, including sums for the 
infirmary addition, life science and classroom and office building, 
and general planning funds amounted to $1,400,000. 

Land acquisition funds total $100,000. 

Construction funds requested for Bartlett West (including 
replacement of the tennis courts) ; the Power Plant addition and re- 
location of farm buildings totaled $11,200,000. 

Discussion followed on the latter item, and it was agreed 
to confer with the College of Agriculture leadership to establish 
the farm relocation figure of $2,800,000 closer to the original 1.5 
million dollars agreed upon. 

Sums requested in the Support item, totaled $6,670,000. 
Included were amounts for utilities, renovation of Flint Laboratory: 
roads, walks, parking facilities and lighting; also, equipment. 

It was reported that there is currently unexpended in 
utilities design the sum of 2.8 million dollars. However, all of 
this money is programmed. An additional $800,000 will, therefore, 
be required for 1969. This sum would be utilized as follows: 

a. connecting utilities to the site for Uni- 
versity College 

b. Incinerator Treatment Plant 

c. wiring to connect monitoring system to 
new and old buildings 

The sum requested under Renovations, in addition to work 

at Flint Laboratory, would include projects at Hasbrouek, Food 

Technology, Fernald Hall and Stockbridge Hall. The sum of $250,000 
is provided for "In House" projects. 

The Equipment item includes funds for the Research Center 
so that Federal matching funds may become available. The Treasurer 
noted that this facility will go out to bid on December 29, 1967. 
An item of $1,250,000 was included for equipment at UM at Boston. 

After brief discussion, it was agreed that library items 
for Boston and Amherst budgeted in the 1969 operating budget re- 
quest should be picked up and added in. 

Mr. Littlefield observed that a sizeable appropriation of 
planning money is needed at this time, or the University will find 
itself in a major construction slowdown approximately five years 
hence. Specifically, if planning funds are not made available for 



I 



I 1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Classroom- Laboratory-Auditorium Building for the College of 
Arts and Sciences, there will be no major capital project for 1970, 

The linear priority was established as follows: 

1. Classroom-Laboratory-Auditorium Build- 
ing/College of Arts & Sciences 

2. Infirmary 

3. General Construction 

4. Power Plant Addition 

Chancellor Ryan assured the committee that the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston will provide its capital and equipment 
priorities to the Planning Officer in time for another meeting of 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee prior to December 18, 1967. 

It was stressed that the Capital Outlay Request for 1969 
must be submitted to the Executive Department prior to Christmas. 

After further brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst capital out- 
lay request for fiscal 1969 in the 
amount of $19,320,000, subject to a 
review of Flint Laboratory renovations 
and including the addition of Library 
request funds. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that our renovations work 
accomplished by the firm of Drummey, Rosane & Anderson at UM/Boston 
was satisfactory to date. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer extend the present contract 
with Drummey, Rosane & Anderson, Inc. for 
designer services to cover Massachusetts 
State Project U68-1-Item 8068-28 for cer- 
tain renovations and improvements to pro- 
vide additional teaching and laboratory 
facilities at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Boston. 

The Treasurer distributed to the committee a sheet list- 
ing fourteen applications for the architectural contract for the 
Life Sciences Building, as submitted to the Designer Selection 
Board. Additional applications will be coming in. Trustee Gordon 
noted that there appeared to be a mix up on the list between appli- 
cations for the Life Sciences list and the Infirmary list. The 



300? 



Architects 
for UM/Boston 
Renovations : 
Life Science 
Building; 
Addition to 
Infirmary 



3008 



COMMITTEE 



Fraternity- 
Sorority 
Park Develop- 
ments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer advised deferring a vote until the next meeting of the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee. In the meantime, the Trustees 
will have an opportunity to study the lists and receive notice of 
additional names of applicants. These named will be provided to 
the members of the committee by the Treasurer. 

The Treasurer reminded the committee that the proposed 
Fraternity-Sorority Park is a corporation which obtained land off 
East Pleasant Street in Amherst with the hope of developing a total 
complex of 24 houses. At present, six or eight prospective members 
have "signed up. 

It is desirable from the University point of view, as well 
as that of the fraternities and sororities to remove the existing 
Greek houses from the North Pleasant Street-Fearing Street-Phillips 
Streets area. There is widespread concern about the possibility of 
a slum deterioration in that vicinity. 

To date, the Fraternity-Sorority Park Corporation has had 
financing difficulties in endeavoring to handle the project as a 
package. Prospective investors request the University to guarantee 
the project so that mortgages may be backed. The State Street Bank 
and Trust as well as the Connecticut General were asked whether they 
would accept the same type of guarantee that we extend to the Uni- 
versity Building Authority: namely, that the University would 
assign students to fill a house in the event that it got into diffi- 
culties. The answer was that stronger guarantees would be required. 

Obviously, it would be to the advantage of the University 
as well as the town of Amherst if the aforementioned North Pleasant 
Street-Fearing Street area could be cleared so that private de- 
velopers could be brought in to build high-rise apartments for 
faculty or married students. 

The Treasurer reported that further developments have 
stymied at this point, and the Fraternity-Sorority Park Corporation 
now appears to be discouraged. 

Trustee Gordon suggested that the University and the 
Fraternity-Sorority Park Corporation might consult with certain 
private developers to determine whether they would be interested in 
handling the project. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:12 p.m. 




Robe 
Secretary, 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

December 8, 1967, 11:00 a.m., University of Massachusetts, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 
Haigis, Kiernan, Lambson, Lyons, Maginnis, 
Rowland; Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Hunsberger, Dean Moore, Dr. Havard, Mr, 
Miss Coulter. 



Suid, 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. He in- 
vited Dr. Havard to address the meeting, submitting the report of 
the Ad Hoc Law School Committee of which Dr. Havard is Chairman. 

Dr. Havard referred to Document 66-086 titled: 
FEASIBILITY STUDY: THE NEED FOR A UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LAW 
SCHOOL, previously supplied (1966) and stated that since that time 
additional information has been compiled, substantially confirming 
the original projections. Dr. Havard said current figures of the 
American Bar Association, the Association of American Law Schools 
and the Educational Testing Service indicate that in fact earlier 
estimates of demands for legal education were overly conservative. 
The number of applications to law school increased by 327o over the 
previous year, during the academic year 1966-67; while the total ex 
pansion of spaces open increased only 6.27<, in the member institutiirs 

Dr. Havard noted that the number of students indicating 
interest in attending law school at the University of Massachusetts 
increased from 102 (at the time the Feasibility Study was released) 
in 1966, to 212 in the fall of 1967. From the class of 1969, 225 
students have stated their interest in law school. 

Recently the Ad Hoc Committee communicated with every 
accredited law school in Massachusetts, supplying them with copies 
of the report and inviting responses. The reaction has been posi- 
tive to date from Boston College, Boston University and Harvard Law 
School; Dean Drinan of Boston College Law School has offered to 
compile a joint statement of support from these institutions which 
will be forthcoming soon. 

Professor Havard distributed copies of a current report 
of his committee, which included an exposition of the demand for a 
legal education, a suggested planning budget encompassing the first 
and second planning years. 

The budget indicated basic salaries which included, the 
first year, a Dean, a Librarian, and secretarial help, totalling 
$45,500. A library of 8,000 volumes was estimated to cost $80,000. 
Supporting services were estimated at $14,200 and would include 
budgets for travel, advertising and printing, equipment and other 



3009 



Law School 



3010 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

office and administrative expenses (see attached), a total of 
$139,700. The second year budget forecase showed the same cate- 
gories, with normal escalation to provide for increased activity 
(also attached), the net budget request totaling $159,500. 

Chairman Troy commended the committee for the quality and 
thoroughness of the report and called for questions and discussion. 

Trustee Maginnis raised the question of whether in fact 
only 40 or 50 out of 100 graduates actually practiced law. Dr. 
Havard affirmed this possibility, noting that the basic legal edu- 
cation prepared students for employment opportunities in business, 
public service, welfare, conservation, labor movement, various 
government capacities and a wide range of other fields. It was 
pointed out that (for example) our own University President Lederle 
has, among other degrees, a law degree. 

President Lederle said good lawyers are in short supply 
and there is a real need for the legally educated. He noted, how- 
ever, that in a majority of cases, including his own, students do 
practice law when first graduated and may then later divert to 
other fields of employment. 

Chairman Troy noted that as society becomes more affluent 
the need for the legally trained is accented. Trustee Lambson 
pointed out that in our burgeoning society, the expanded need for 
legal services is evidenced by the normally increased mundane 
businesses of suburbia: property transfers, housing transactions, 
marriage and divorce matters, growing accident and injury cases, 
etc. He drew attention in the report to the fact that Massachusetts 
is one of the few states in the country which does not have its own 
public law school, and expressed enthusiasm for the proposal in 
view of the need. 

Trustee Kiernan questioned whether the University has been 
in close enough touch with local counterparts. Dr. Havard assured 
that the Deans of the various schools had been in communication with 
the Ad Hoc Committee and a circular letter, incorporating their 
views was prepared and would be supplied to the Trustees shortly. 
He said the overall view indicated the area law schools are very 
much impressed with what the University has done so far and they 
would be in favor of the establishment of the law school in the 
western part of the state. 

Trustee Kiernan stressed the importance and advantages of 
full communication with other law schools at this time. 

Mr. Suid, pre-law advisor, said that all of the Boston 
law schools have high tuition rates, in fact the highest in the 
country, so that the average student could not undertake such a 
financial situation. He said tuition is in the area of $1,600, 
plus room and board; this emphasizes the need for a law school with 
reasonable tuition, to bring a legal education within the reach of 
our students. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Troy questioned whether there would be a possibility 
of commuting students and was advised there is great potential for 
this in the Amherst area and thus the University would be providing 
an important additional service. 

President Lederle commented that the University began as 
an agricultural college and over the years has added the college of 
arts and sciences, the engineering school, medical school, etc. and 
to be well rounded, with a broader pattern, there is a need now to 
add a law school. 

Chairman Troy then called for comments and questions on 
the budget as proposed. 

Professor Havard said the figures on the budget were com- 
bined after conference with the deans of the law schools. 

The space needs of the proposed school were discussed. 
Dr. Havard said there must be space assigned specifically in order 
to have the school accredited, but there is no necessity for a law 
school building at the beginning of the program. A separate build- 
ing would be highly desirable to have as soon as possible, he said, 
but space can be carved out of an existing building in the meantime. 
He estimated that it would be five years before a separate building 
would be required. 

With reference to the library, 8,000 volumes are required 
to insure accreditation; it is hoped to move within the five-year 
period, to a possible 50,000 or 60,000 volume library, to accommo- 
date increased enrollment and need. 

The President advised that a law school is a very 
economical school. Average cost per studnt is more nearly $1,500 
as compared to almost $7,000 in a medical school. He said the law 
school could be absorbed in the normal planned growth of the Uni- 
versity. 

Trustee Lyons noted that it is possible to have large 
classes in a law school as compared to small classes in a medical 
school. 

In response to Trustee Rowland's question as to the type 
of building to be considered for the law school, President Lederle 
replied it would not be an elaborate one. He concurred with Pro- 
fessor Havard that the nature and needs of the school are such that 
the library is the important area. In addition there would be need 
for a large classroom for each of three classes in a school of four 
to five hundred students. Space must also be provided for a 
Practice Court, plus two or three small seminar rooms. The cost of 
such a building would be approximately two to three million dollars. 
Provost Tippo pointed out that the cost for the building for the 
law school in Colorado was approximately $1,000,000. It was noted 
that the overall cost is kept low due to the type of building which 
need not include the specialized equipment and facilities, such as 
laboratories, which increase the cost of other academic structures. 



301 



3012 



COMMITTEE 



Professor, 
Department of 
Economics 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Kiernan questioned whether, on the fiscal pro- 
jections, the experience of other colleges had been explored in 
order to establish a leveling-ff figure. Mr. Suid affirmed this 
had been done and a 47o figure resulted. There was discussion which 
brought out that generally the ratio of professors to secretarial 
help is higher in a law school and the cost in this area is 
correspondingly higher. 

Chairman Troy thanked Messrs. Havard and Suid for their 
presentation, and they left the meeting. 

There was discussion. The President noted that this pro- 
posal was not included in the budget, due to the fact such high 
priority items as UM/Boston site and the Medical School were. How- 
ever, the need, as here substantiated, would appear to dictate the 
necessity of communicating with the Board of Higher Education and 
it is hoped the Legislature would then lend support. The President 
commented that the McGuane Bill and others legislatively initiated 
call upon the University to establish a law school. He felt that 
the University should proceed affirmatively. He assured Chairman 
Troy that the report as presently prepared would be updated without 
delay. 

Trustee Lambson expressed enthusiasm for the proposal, 
endorsing its directness and simplicity, free from complicating 
embellishments . 

After general discussion, it was the sense of the meeting 
to recommend to the Board of Trustees that they support establish- 
ment of a law school at the University at the earliest possible 
date; to be established at the University campus in Amherst and that 
the administration be encouraged to support bills that have been 
introduced to that end. 

In the event the Board of Trustees approves the study as 
presented, copies are to be supplied to the Board of Higher Educa- 
tion for their information and review. 

On motion thereupon made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
actively support establishment of a law school 
at the University in Amherst and instruct the 
administration to proceed with the Board of 
Higher Education and legislative leaders as may 
be indicated. 

Chairman Troy then introduced Dean Hunsberger to the meet- 
ing. The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences distributed to 
the committee copies of a memorandum which outlined the efforts of 
the Economics Department over the past four years to improve and 
develop the calibre of the department. The Dean emphasized the 
continuing effort to secure a head for this department and submitted 
a proposal for appointment of a very exceptional, well-qualified 
and highly regarded candidate. 



COMMITTEE 



3013 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The addition of this man to the faculty would assure un- 
questioned major advance in the department, as well as improve the 
general stature of the University, he said. The Dean recommended 
that this candidate be offered a "University Professorship" in the 
sense that he would not be limited to any department, school or 
college, so that his diversified abilities and interests could be 
utilized in areas of most value to the University. The Dean 
emphasized, for example, that the candidate has keen interest in 
the School of Business as well as the College of Arts and Sciences 
and such an arrangement would permit maximum use of this outstand- 
ing man. 

The Dean described at length the exceptional qualifica- 
tions of the candidate and enthusiastically endorsed the recommen- 
dations of the faculty screening committee and the consultants who 
had been retained to aid in the development of the department 
(Messrs. Solow of MIT, Borts of Brown and Klein of Pennsylvania). 
Dean Hunsberger then read excerpts of a series of letters received 
in response to our inquiry, all indicating the outstanding ability 
of the candidate. The Dean also made available reprints of articles 
and several books authored by the candidate. 

There was discussion encompassing salaries, with exten- 
sive consideration of fringe benefits available at private insti- 
tutions as compared to state universities. There was general 
agreement that these benefits, which include free tuition at any 
university or college, for eligible offspring, retirement plans, 
etc. combined to substantial proportions and must be considered in 
making an offer. It was on this basis that Dean Hunsberger urged 
prompt action and the necessity for an over-the-scale appointment. 

The Dean added that the recruitment problem would be all 
but solved, with the addition of this candidate to the staff, for nc 
only would the quality of the candidate attract others, but he has 
indicated he would be able to bring four additional staff members, 
for vacancies in the department which have up to now been difficult 
to find. 

Chairman Troy expressed pleasure that the report indi- 
cated the Economics Department has come out of the doldrums. Trustee 
Lyons suggested that the department, in addition to the document 
supplied, submit to the Board of Trustees any studies on the 
problems of the state which would prove interesting and useful. 
Provost Tippo said Dr. Seligman (the Director of the Labor Relations 
and Research Center) as well as others have done some studies on 
such problems and these could be made available. 

Provost Tippo said he had met the candidate and he was un- 
questionably an outstanding man. The Provost advised he had also 
consulted around the country and found the candidate is hailed as 
one of the best. 

Following Trustee Maginnis ' comment that the only remain- 
ing problem then was the question of salaries, Trustee Lyons asked 
for the administration's comments. 



3014 



COMMITTEE 



University 

Marine 

Laboratory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle expressed concern at high salary re- 
quirements noting that the University has been most prudent in use 
of the "over-scale" provision. He queried the possibility of other 
ways to solve the dollar problem. 

In response to Trustee Rowland's inquiry as to how long 
this candidate could be expected to stay, Dean Hunsberger was 
unable to predict, describing personal factors which influence the 
candidate's location. 

Provost Tippo said there is a lack at the top of senior 
or outstanding professors. He said the accreditation report 
pointed this out. The Provost said until the distinguished Pro- 
fessor Stone joins our faculty, there is no one who has been 
elected to the National Academy of Science, for example. 

Trustee Lambson said this is basic economy. In order to— 
build excellence, it is necessary to have the best. He encouraged 
consideration of this candidate and the extension of a salary offer 
commensurate with the need. The Trustee said this man appears to 
be well-rounded and has what it takes to build the department. 

On motion of Trustee Lambson and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

every' effort be exerted to obtain the candidate. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:50 and reconvened at the 
Statler Hilton Hotel, at luncheon, at 1:00 p.m., Trustees Rowland 
and Kiernan having left the meeting. 

The Dean of the Graduate School, Dr. Edward C. Moore, 
described and presented supporting memorandum (Document T68-038) of 
a site visit on November 22, 1967 at Gloucester, Massachusetts by 
the University Committee on Marine Science. The Dean advised that 
the Town Council of Gloucester and State Senator Saltonstall indi- 
cated that a suitable site for development as a marine station 
could be had and the site visit followed. 

Dean Moore, illustrating on an area map, described the 
location and outlined the facilities which would be available. 
Briefly, he said, this primary site, the one with greatest potential 
for development as a marine laboratory station, is presently owned 
and operated by the United States Coast Guard on Dolliver Neck 
(southwest of the harbor) . The site was described as ten minutes 
from the center of Gloucester; one-quarter of a mile long; 
peninsula separated from the mainland by a salt marsh and tidal 
stream. Access from a city street is through a single dirt road 
which runs the length of the peninsula. The Dolliver Neck site is 
approximately 2% hours from the Amherst campus of the University. 
The Dean pointed out that this would permit field trips from the 
campus within the span of one day. 



COMMITTEE 



301 5 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Dean said the coastal and terrestrial features of 
this site are diverse and well suited for development of a marine 
laboratory and would permit a multidisciplinary approach. 

Dean Moore, indicating on the survey map, described two 
small parcels of land (less than 2 acres) owned by the U. S. 
Government. Three buildings (dwelling or headquarters building, 
garage and boathouse) are in excellent repair; each has electrical 
facilities and a separate heating unit. The complement of 25 Coast 
Guard personnel are adequately housed in the dwelling. The kitchen 
and mess facilities are in process of being renovated, and it would 
seem this building could easily be converted into the central build- 
ing for housing, messing and recreation area for the marine labora- 
tory. 

The boathouse, Dean Moore said, is a two-story frame 
building. Both the top and bottom floors are spacious and present 
potential for development into the primary laboratory facility of 
the marine station. Without adding to the existing building size, 
a university marine laboratory could easily be constructed. The 
proximity of the laboratory to the water and docking facilities 
would expedite the handling of research material and reduce the 
distance of piping sea water for laboratory use. 

The third building, a garage, is a two-story frame build- 
ing, and with minor modifications could serve as a lecture-labora- 
tory facility or the garage-storage-workshop areas such as its 
current use. 

In summary, Dean Moore said, the Coast Guard Station at 
Gloucester is considered highly desirable as a site for the develop- 
ment of the university-operated marine station. As it now exists, 
it could be used at once by research teams of students and staff 
interested in marine-oriented investigations. With subsequent 
development, including the purchase of some of the private land 
adjoining, this site could easily become one of the finest uni- 
versity operated marine stations on the east coast. The Dean 
quoted the nine points in favor of immediate action by the Uni- 
versity Trustees to acquire this property, as set forth in the 
Wilce - Gentile report: 

1. The proximity of the site to the University of 
Massachusetts and its location of the north shore 
of the state. 

2. The excellence of the site with respect to diversity 
of available ecological habitats and abundance of 
marine biota. 

3. The fact that the property will in all probability 

be an outright gift to the University of Massachusetts. 

4. The fact that the three existing buildings could be 
used almost immediately as a marine facility for 
research students and staff. 



3016 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

5. The relative isolation of Dolliver Neck from the town 
of Gloucester and a common city thoroughfare. 

6. The fact that the town of Gloucester is willing to 
defray some of the initial cost of developing the 
marine laboratory. 

7. Gloucester is the site of the regional laboratories 
of the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries and the director of 
these laboratories would welcome a university-operated 
marine facility at Gloucester. The University would 
benefit through mutual cooperation with this govern- 
ment laboratory. Some of our staff and students are 
even now working on various research programs at this 
laboratory. 

8. Gloucester represents an immediate source of marine 
craftsmen, supplies and docking facilities; the town's 
inner harbor is less than one mile from the boathouse, 
easy reach in time of storm or repair of one or 
another type. 

9. The Dolliver Neck site is also attractive in view of 
the adjacent private land which is reported to be for 
sale. To be a workable station, the coast guard 
property must be enlarged through purchase of private 
land; the Dolliver Neck peninsula may well have this 
land available. 

Dean Moore explained that the Coast Guard is abandoning 
many of its boat stations in favor of heliports and the Dolliver 
Neck station is one which they would like to phase out. The phas- 
ing out can be completed much more quickly if the University ex- 
presses an interest in acquiring the site. The combined efforts 
of the local newspapers and State Senator William Saltonstall 
resulted in bringing about the site visit by Messrs. Gentile and 
Wilce and the aforementioned report. The local newspaper has indi- 
cated it would try to raise $25,000 to aid in this transfer if the 
University is interested. 

The Dean stated this is an ideal site from the scientific 
point of view. The proposed agreement is that the Coast Guard 
would phase out during the next five years and the University would 
phase in, at no cost to the University. The great advantage to 
this arrangement, he said, is that as the Coast Guard goes out, it 
is in excellent condition and we can acquire some miscellaneous 
pieces of equipment. In addition, a good marine science library is 
available to us through the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. 

Dean Moore said there were more than 25 field trips last 
year without benefit of a base. With this as a base, 25-30 people 
in residence could be served and it is possible that a director 
could reside on the station. 



COMMITTEE 



301? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to a question, Dean Moore stated the Graduate 
School has been looking at sites for over 3 year so the Coast Guard 
were familiar with the University's interest and thus presented the 
opportunity when the site became available. 

The Dean advised that a meeting is scheduled December 12 
of the Board of Higher Education Committee on Oceanography, at 
which time he would hope to be able to inform them of our interest 
and gain the support also of the Chancellor. 

In response to a question, Dean Moore stated no out-of- 
pocket expense is anticipated other than that of the new position 
of full-time director ($20,000 area) and secretarial assistance 
($5,000). He added that there is a considerable amount of federal 
money in this now and there is great possibility of securing 
additional. The facility would be made available to state colleges 
and community colleges by the University. 

It was the sense of the meeting to approve in principle 
the further exploration of the Gloucester area as a site for a 
marine science station; the Board to appropriately authorize the 
Treasurer to draw up an agreement. 

Provost Tippo submitted to the committee a listing of 
SABBATICAL LEAVE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 1968-69 (Document T68-039) . 
He stated the seventh year is the sabbatical year - following six 
working years. Chairman Troy urged that eligible faculty members 
spend this time away from the campus . The list is of normal size 
and contains eight more names than the previous year. 

Motion was thereupon made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the list of faculty members 
recommended for sabbatical leaves for 
1968-69 as amended and attached herewith 
(Document T68-039) . 

The Provost then circulated and read aloud Senate 
Document 68-007, a Faculty Senate Ad Hoc Committee report on 
Picketing and the proposed policies dealing with picketing and 
other forms of demonstration on the University campus. 

The Provost reviewed the history of this matter, stating 
the Faculty Senate appointed an Ad Hoc Committee to discuss and 
propose policy. 

The Provost stated, faculty meetings have been held on 
this subject and procedures to be followed developed. The Senate 
felt it most important that the President be the person charged with 
the responsibility for taking action. In view of the wide 
discussion with both faculty and student bodies, publishing in the 
Daily Collegian and subject of debates on campus, no one can be 
unaware of the proposed policy. Trustee Maginnis emphasized the 
responsibility to protect state property from damage or misuse. 



Sabbatical 

Leaves 

1968-69 



Picketing 



3018 



COMMITTEE 



Japanese 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval in principle of the polices set out 
in Senate Document 68-007, with reference 
to picketing and other forms of demonstration 
on campus . 

The Provost submitted a communication from Dr. Varley, 
Master of the Orchard Hill Residential College with reference to a 
proposed summer Japanese program at Sophia University for 25 stu- 
dents. The program would be completely financed by the students; 
the cost to each student would be $1,300. Dr. Varley asked that 
the University sanction the endeavor and lend its name. The pro- 
gram is designed to give the participants an opportunity to expand 
to another culture; a minimum of 21 students will be required. 
Academic credit will be earned. In view of the fact that this 
program had not been processed through the usual academic channels, 
it was the sense of the meeting that a more formal presentation 
should be made and resubmitted to the Board, through the appropriate 
academic departments . 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:18 p.m. 





Secretary^ Board of Tr 




I 







H 

iter 
■ 

Bis 

m m 



c»« 







mm 



^ : 



v fe^^ 















*aalr%^?> 



NtvHn 

(I 








■ 



Si